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(Barstool Sports)   Scientists who have never watched the first 10 minutes of any horror movie decide to bring back the extinct Tasmanian Tiger   (barstoolsports.com) divider line
    More: Strange, Thylacine, Tasmania, Apex predator, Food chain, Ecology, main cause of the thylacine, Trophic level, only member of the family Thylacinidae  
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380 clicks; posted to STEM » on 18 Aug 2022 at 9:46 PM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



12 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-08-18 6:53:33 PM  
It's worth the risk, I remember seeing a picture in my HS biology text back in 1980, and thinking how cool it would be if we could bring it back in a lab some day. It is a cool time to be alive from a science stand point. Don't get me wrong I would never get anywhere close to that thing uncaged, it looks like the grim reaper with fur.
 
2022-08-18 7:17:12 PM  
A few minor problems:

1. No closely related animals to birth and raise the Thylacine.

2. Even if successfully cloned enough times to create a population, the lack of genetic diversity could be an enormous problem. I think it is unlikely that there is a lot of Thylacine DNA from different animals just hanging around.

3. With the trophic changes to habitat, there may not be enough good habitat for the species.

4. People. "Hold my beer Bruce.  Nobody's shot one of these things in a hundred years!"

I wish them luck. I think the chances are better of finding a surviving relic population than establishing a new Thylacine population, but I hope I am wrong.
 
2022-08-18 7:36:23 PM  
It's not a bad idea. They're toting it as a way to rebalance an ecosystem by reintroducing an extinct species, so I guess it's a kind of feasibility study of using DNA storage bank as a sort of "backup" of a species. There's already a number of repositories of biological and genetic material (the Svalbard seed bank, a number of gene/DNA banks for endangered species, etc) who would be greatly interested in having this be a reality
 
2022-08-18 9:16:31 PM  
If it turned out that they preferentially liked to prey and feed on feral house cats, this would be a great thing.
 
2022-08-18 10:44:04 PM  
 
2022-08-18 10:49:42 PM  

BigMax: A few minor problems:

1. No closely related animals to birth and raise the Thylacine.

2. Even if successfully cloned enough times to create a population, the lack of genetic diversity could be an enormous problem. I think it is unlikely that there is a lot of Thylacine DNA from different animals just hanging around.

3. With the trophic changes to habitat, there may not be enough good habitat for the species.

4. People. "Hold my beer Bruce.  Nobody's shot one of these things in a hundred years!"

I wish them luck. I think the chances are better of finding a surviving relic population than establishing a new Thylacine population, but I hope I am wrong.


1. Yes, there are closely related animals to birth them. Ok, raising is another matter. For that they're talking artificial pouches (they're marsupials).

2. They went extinct about a century ago, and the last known survivors were in zoos. There are plenty of samples in museums. Of course not all of those samples have viable DNA, but it's not like all this is riding in cloning a population from a single sample.

3. No expert, but think they're focused on this species not only because of the availability of samples (going back to 2) and close relatives to provide wombs (1) but a habitat that is not only is good, but is lacking native predators. (Because this was a main predator in the habitat until, you know, we extincted it.)

4. Yeah, well, got no answer for that one. History does have a way of repeating.
 
2022-08-18 10:51:04 PM  
Why for they put them in the cold cold ground?
 
2022-08-18 10:59:04 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-08-18 11:56:48 PM  

BigMax: I wish them luck. I think the chances are better of finding a surviving relic population than establishing a new Thylacine population, but I hope I am wrong.


Or find a surviving population and then fundraise millions of dollars to "clone" one and it is easy money with no expensive science.
 
2022-08-19 12:51:35 AM  
William Gibson says what?
 
2022-08-19 1:00:05 AM  

BretMavrik: [Fark user image image 400x400]


That's Dave Mathews not Tasmanian tigers you gotta watch out for.
 
2022-08-19 3:36:53 AM  
Picture this, but meaner:
upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size
 
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