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(Deslidefied)   You will only hear these ten old-fashioned food terms in New England. Yes, there is more than chowdah and lobstah among this reason   (deslide.clusterfake.net) divider line
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768 clicks; posted to Food » on 18 Aug 2022 at 7:50 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-08-18 7:46:46 AM  
Grinder? Yeah they don't use that term in my neck of the woods.
 
2022-08-18 7:59:28 AM  
List fails without tonic.  Or more specifically, TAWNIC.

Also, it should be noted that in certain parts of New England, I'm looking at you Rhode Island, the actual old-school racist term is Guinea Grinder.
 
2022-08-18 8:00:30 AM  
well that made me chuckle.  As a born and bred New Englander, I've heard all but one of those (WTF is a "Spuckie"??).  And of the 9 that I've heard, I'd say that "grinder" is *not* a New England term.  We call them "subs".
"Creeme" is not one I use.

The remaining 7?  Yep, have used them and still use them.

They forgot "cabinet" - another term for frappe
and "tonic" - the generic term for any soda (though this one has gone out of use)
and "rotary" - a roundabout on a road

and I'm sure there's more.  Isn't is amazing that local areas have their own dialect!  Stunning news development.
 
2022-08-18 8:10:36 AM  
Want to start trouble at a New England ice cream stand? Ask for your cone topped with sprinkles! In much of New England, the colorful candies sprinkled on top of ice cream are referred to as "jimmies." Ask for rainbow jimmies or chocolate jimmies and you won't have any trouble.

And if you want the colors mixed up well, ask the clerk to rustle them.
 
2022-08-18 8:20:20 AM  
Creemee, Soupy, Spuckie... all super specific to like single towns.  Some are a bit dated as well.  Haven't heard the term grinder this century, Most of us know Scrod is something to avoid, as the restaurant/market is intentionally leaving the species of fish vague.  Hell, at my local convenience store I can order a "three and three" and get three tenders and three potato wedges.  Doesn't mean it's a regional New England thing.

May as well have included cabinet, for that one Rhode Island area that calls chocolate shakes, chocolate cabinets, and sells coffee milks as well.
 
2022-08-18 8:21:10 AM  
Go to the grinder shop to get a 9" and meatballs
 
2022-08-18 8:27:03 AM  
A local baker here in New Hampshire sells "Grinder Rolls" at the grocery store.  Printed right on the label.  "Subs" became more popular when Subway invaded.

A frappe (milkshake with ice cream) is or was called a "cabinet" in Rhode Island.

"Spuckie" must be limited to four blocks in Boston.  I've never heard it anywhere in New England.

And be sure to miss...

The Devil Came Up To Boston (Video) Adam Ezra Group
Youtube zWVcIn7Q4Cc
 
2022-08-18 8:31:14 AM  

claytonemery: A local baker here in New Hampshire sells "Grinder Rolls" at the grocery store.  Printed right on the label.  "Subs" became more popular when Subway invaded.

A frappe (milkshake with ice cream) is or was called a "cabinet" in Rhode Island.

"Spuckie" must be limited to four blocks in Boston.  I've never heard it anywhere in New England.

And be sure to miss...

[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/zWVcIn7Q4Cc]


I grew up saying "sub" in the Boston suburbs.  And I'm old, so it was long before Subway came into play.
My NJ college roommate thought "sub" was hysterical and that "hoagie" was totally normal.
 
2022-08-18 8:37:21 AM  
ProcrastinationStation:

They forgot "cabinet" - another term for frappe


They actually mentioned that. It was part of the frappe entry.
 
2022-08-18 8:38:04 AM  
Scrod.

Reminds me of a joke from Playboy many years ago: (short version)

Guy gets into a cab in Boston and talks to the cabbie about food,

The guy says, "Where can I get scrod around here?"

Cabbie says, "I've heard it called a lot of things, but never in the plu-perfect subjunctive."

(I have no idea what plu-perfect subjunctive means)
 
2022-08-18 8:39:56 AM  

Rene ala Carte: Scrod.

Reminds me of a joke from Playboy many years ago: (short version)

Guy gets into a cab in Boston and talks to the cabbie about food,

The guy says, "Where can I get scrod around here?"

Cabbie says, "I've heard it called a lot of things, but never in the plu-perfect subjunctive."

(I have no idea what plu-perfect subjunctive means)


I'm pretty sure you can get scrod on grindr.
 
2022-08-18 8:41:01 AM  

kdawg7736: Grinder? Yeah they don't use that term in my neck of the woods.


In my MA town we sure did.
 
2022-08-18 8:43:51 AM  
Ten terms you'll only hear in New England!

First item:  Oh, yeah, they use this in Wisconsin also. (actually only in certain parts of Wisconsin)
 
2022-08-18 8:44:04 AM  
Package stores were called such because Liquor Stores (called such right out in the open like that) were once illegal in MA. Plus, going on a Packy run just sounds right.
 
2022-08-18 8:44:09 AM  
After years in Maine, it's always going to be a grinder.

Scrod is more than just 'catch of the day' it's young cod. Li'l ones. Often used as a placeholder for white fish, but it does refer to a specific product.

In our neck of the woods, it was going down to the Dairy Stand or Creamery instead of the ice cream shack.

Hoodsie cups are a specific brand. Hood milk is fairly popular in Maine. Hoodsie cups are their tiny ice cream packs. It's not a generic term, but a specific product. The Harbor Bar is similar: a very specific product brand.

Going to the Packie is a thing.

Bubbler is still a thing Down East.

There IS a difference between Boston Baked Beans and a Bean Supper. A Bean Supper or Dinner is down at the VFW Hall and shared amongst your friends, relations, and neighbors. Boston Baked Beans is something that you see in a copy of Down East for the tourists. Boston Baked Beans is for people from Away.

Frappe is more than a New England thing. I spent a lot of years in the South growing up, and a Frappe is a whole thing all over, especially if your drug store had a soda fountain.

Soupy and Spuckie are super specific regional terms. Not really 'New England' but neighborhood thing.
 
2022-08-18 8:46:52 AM  
List fails without scobbledygook.

Or maybe it doesn't. It was a thing where I grew up but maybe not too far from there.

Scobbledygook = a big pile of scrambled eggs with whatever in the fridge wants using up in it. It's almost always wicked tasty.
 
2022-08-18 8:47:48 AM  

UberDave: Want to start trouble at a New England ice cream stand? Ask for your cone topped with sprinkles! In much of New England, the colorful candies sprinkled on top of ice cream are referred to as "jimmies." Ask for rainbow jimmies or chocolate jimmies and you won't have any trouble.

And if you want the colors mixed up well, ask the clerk to rustle them.


New Englander here. Several days ago I went to the ice cream shop next door and asked for colored sprinkles. Walked out of there with festive-looking ice cream and all my bones intact. Maybe the cheerful young man behind the counter thought it was wrong to beat up an old lady, I don't know.
 
2022-08-18 8:52:39 AM  

Monster Island: ProcrastinationStation:

They forgot "cabinet" - another term for frappe


They actually mentioned that. It was part of the frappe entry.


well that's what I get for just skimming the entries!  :)
 
2022-08-18 8:57:20 AM  

kdawg7736: Grinder? Yeah they don't use that term in my neck of the woods.


I'm sure you can find them on a menu at an Italian place not too far from you.
 
2022-08-18 10:01:57 AM  

hubiestubert: After years in Maine, it's always going to be a grinder.

Scrod is more than just 'catch of the day' it's young cod. Li'l ones. Often used as a placeholder for white fish, but it does refer to a specific product.

In our neck of the woods, it was going down to the Dairy Stand or Creamery instead of the ice cream shack.

Hoodsie cups are a specific brand. Hood milk is fairly popular in Maine. Hoodsie cups are their tiny ice cream packs. It's not a generic term, but a specific product. The Harbor Bar is similar: a very specific product brand.

Going to the Packie is a thing.

Bubbler is still a thing Down East.

There IS a difference between Boston Baked Beans and a Bean Supper. A Bean Supper or Dinner is down at the VFW Hall and shared amongst your friends, relations, and neighbors. Boston Baked Beans is something that you see in a copy of Down East for the tourists. Boston Baked Beans is for people from Away.

Frappe is more than a New England thing. I spent a lot of years in the South growing up, and a Frappe is a whole thing all over, especially if your drug store had a soda fountain.

Soupy and Spuckie are super specific regional terms. Not really 'New England' but neighborhood thing.


Came here for all of this, and to reminisce.
 
2022-08-18 10:14:49 AM  

hubiestubert: Scrod is more than just 'catch of the day' it's young cod. Li'l ones. Often used as a placeholder for white fish, but it does refer to a specific product.


Having worked in a New England deli, it had nothing to do with little ones.  It was a more generic white fish, that couldn't sell legally as haddock or cod.  It was for suckers.
 
2022-08-18 10:32:29 AM  

kdawg7736: Grinder? Yeah they don't use that term in my neck of the woods.


In Lsmoille county, Vermont, I made a million.

... Grinders.

And they beat the snot out of hoagies.


Don't get me started on "ox roast"
 
2022-08-18 12:30:45 PM  
I went to small hippy-dippy college in the Pacific Northwest. I had never really spent time outside of New England before college. Sure, we had the occasional family vacation, but I wasn't really interacting with people my own age.

I'm hanging out with my new roommates during orientation. One of them, Wendall, is 21 and I ask him if he'd be willing to run a packie for us.

It took about half an hour to convince my roommates that what I really wanted beer and I wasn't trying to pay Wendall to beat up some Pakistanis.
 
2022-08-18 12:51:31 PM  
My last year in high school I worked in a pseudo-1950s diner right off the 95 in New Hampshire. I've made my fair share of frappes.
 
2022-08-18 1:14:45 PM  
If you want to get scrod get on grinder?
 
2022-08-18 2:00:35 PM  
They seem to think that "bubbler" is a New England thing that somehow ended up in Wisconsin. Just the opposite. When the Kohler Company was starting out, they invented the "Kohler sanitary bubbling drinking fountain" and sold it all over their home state of Wisconsin. They had one salesman who moved out East to try to challenge the monopoly the Crane company had. He did a good job selling the fountains and, long after bubbler became standard in Wisconsin, it entered the New England lexicon.

Also, we called sprinkles "jimmies" for decades here in the Great Lakes region. They became sprinkles sometime in the 90's and jimmies kind of died out except for us old farts.
 
2022-08-18 2:27:48 PM  
catmandu:
Also, we called sprinkles "jimmies" for decades here in the Great Lakes region. They became sprinkles sometime in the 90's and jimmies kind of died out except for us old farts.

There's a story going around the interwebs that the term "jimmies" has a racist past, because at least in New England, the jimmies were the chocolate ones, not the rainbow ones.

I have no idea if there's truth to that story, because I've read articles saying "yes so racist!" and ones saying "no way, that's made up".

I will say, that growing up in the 80s, the ONLY CHOICE for jimmies was the chocolate ones.  It was a rare thing to see the rainbow ones, and even then we still called them jimmies, just rainbow ones.
 
2022-08-18 2:43:40 PM  
Missing is the Chinese restaurant appetizer "Chicken Fingers".  Apparently pretty focused eastern MA, but out here in ROC asking about that got me dirty looks, for sure.

Chicken fingers are pretty much just sweet & sour chicken, but as a standalone appetizer.  Though I've seen recipes that mention that the secret ingredient is Bisquik.

/chipped my tooth on a bubblah in 5th grade
 
2022-08-18 2:45:08 PM  
One thing that disappeared in New England were Clam Fritters.  Chopped clams mixed with yellow corn meal and spices, deep fried, round like a donut hole.  Delicious.  But they're gone.  Some places offer "clam cakes", not the same.

Stuffed quahogs are neat.  Open a quahog, clean the shell.  Grind the quahog with something and spices, then smear the paste back into the shell and bake.  Eat with a spoon.  Ambrosia.  (A "co-hog" is a big clam, and the town where Family Guy lives.)
 
2022-08-18 3:21:05 PM  

Fellini8.5: Missing is the Chinese restaurant appetizer "Chicken Fingers".  Apparently pretty focused eastern MA, but out here in ROC asking about that got me dirty looks, for sure.

Chicken fingers are pretty much just sweet & sour chicken, but as a standalone appetizer.  Though I've seen recipes that mention that the secret ingredient is Bisquik.

/chipped my tooth on a bubblah in 5th grade


Yep. I still can't get proper chicken fingers or egg rolls out here - Wind Tiki in Webster, MA used to make the best eggrolls that, even now, I've ever eaten, and I remember chicken fingers with that lovely Day-Glo red "sweet and sour sauce" from that place, so many years ago.
 
2022-08-18 3:23:15 PM  

claytonemery: One thing that disappeared in New England were Clam Fritters.  Chopped clams mixed with yellow corn meal and spices, deep fried, round like a donut hole.  Delicious.  But they're gone.  Some places offer "clam cakes", not the same.

Stuffed quahogs are neat.  Open a quahog, clean the shell.  Grind the quahog with something and spices, then smear the paste back into the shell and bake.  Eat with a spoon.  Ambrosia.  (A "co-hog" is a big clam, and the town where Family Guy lives.)


No more Rocky Point shore dinners. No more giant clambakes.
 
2022-08-18 3:43:37 PM  

ProcrastinationStation: There's a story going around the interwebs that the term "jimmies" has a racist past, because at least in New England, the jimmies were the chocolate ones, not the rainbow ones.


I've heard that too but I'm a little skeptical. I don't know about everyone else in New England but where I grew up you had to specify whether you wanted chocolate jimmies or rainbow jimmies.
 
2022-08-18 4:10:16 PM  

krebshack: ProcrastinationStation: There's a story going around the interwebs that the term "jimmies" has a racist past, because at least in New England, the jimmies were the chocolate ones, not the rainbow ones.

I've heard that too but I'm a little skeptical. I don't know about everyone else in New England but where I grew up you had to specify whether you wanted chocolate jimmies or rainbow jimmies.


Yeah, that's pretty much shash. Seriously, I never heard of a racial connotation, and they were always "jimmies" regardless of color or flavor when I was a kid. Problem is that no one's nailed the origin, so there are a lot of theories floating around and that's one of them. As the article indicates, it's hard to prove a negative.
 
2022-08-18 4:15:07 PM  
Grew up in NYS (NE-adjacent), and have lived in CT for 25 years now:

1. Have only heard "bubbler" in the context of, "Some people call these 'bubblers.'"
2. Never head of "Creemee"
3. Have only heard "frappe" at, I think, Friendly's? Maybe HoJo? But it was "Frappe" with a capital F. Never heard it generically.
4. Yes, they call them Grinders, even in in Milford, CT, world-headquarters of Subway. (Are 'subs' in NY)
5. It's a product from a specific dairy. Otherwise it's just an ice cream cup.
6. Sprinkles. They're only jimmies if they are rustled.
7. Packie. Not in CT. I don't even hear "Package Store" often. Usually just liquor store.
8. I'm not a fish easter, so I have no idea about "Scrod"
9. Soupy?!? fark no! What the hell?
10. Ditto.

Missing: Apizza (pronounced: "Ah-beetz"). I don't know where the "A" came from, or why it's pronounced that way, but I only hear it as an affectation, no one really calls pizza that. Definitely a New Haven thing and specifically referring to New Haven style pie.
 
2022-08-18 6:04:10 PM  
Is this a small joke?

1) I know bubbler. It's a weird word for that sort of thing but I know of it.
2) Creemee and Frappe are new to me but they make sense on a thematic level. It makes sense.
3) Grinder. Ok. Every place has its oversized sandwiches. Nothing new here but we don't call it that.
4) Hoosdie cup: "A staple of a lot of New England childhoods, a Hoodsie is a tiny paper cup filled with delicious ice cream. You'd find chocolate on one side and vanilla on the other, and it was eaten with a tiny wooden spoon that came on the bottom of the cup. They've been popular since the Massachusetts-based Hood dairy started making them back in 1947."

I think I know what that is. We didn't have that name for it, but we certainly had that sort of thing when I was a kid on a military base in a foreign country. Forgive me, but I recall it not being very good.

5) Jimmies. AKA sprinkles. Everybody has that. Just different names.

6) Virginia has ABC stores which I guess is a packie? Different names.

7) Scrod - now we're deviating from the norm. Never heard of that one.

8) Soupy for soppressata? - why not just call it what it is? Soppressata.

9) Spuckie - looks like it has a heck of a lot of tomato on it. Lose the tomato.
 
2022-08-18 9:08:21 PM  
I was going to mention spuckies if they didn't make the list.  Also you go to Dunkie's and get a regulah (coffee with cream and sugar.)
 
2022-08-18 9:55:41 PM  
My dad was from Connecticut (well, NYC originally, then moved there around middle school).

He definitely called the liquor store a 'package store'. Or a 'class six', which I think is a military thing.  But I never heard 'packie' that I recall.

And we called sprinkles 'jimmies' for quite some time growing up in Maryland, and I don't think it was just our family.  I don't remember when they became 'sprinkles', but I think it was after 1985, when we came back to the states.  (The Dutch call them 'hagel' which means 'hail', and theirs actually qualify as chocolate). It also might just be something like we were more likely to get ice cream while on road trips, though.

It was my boss from Massachussets that used words like 'tonic', 'bubbler', and 'frappe'.

And I thought everyone knew the whole sub / hoagie / grinder regional terms.
 
2022-08-18 10:58:26 PM  

vudukungfu: kdawg7736: Grinder? Yeah they don't use that term in my neck of the woods.

In Lsmoille county, Vermont, I made a million.

... Grinders.

And they beat the snot out of hoagies.


Don't get me started on "ox roast"


Well a sign at a cheesesteak joint I like reads "If you want a sub, join the Navy. If you want a hoagie, see us."
 
2022-08-19 1:46:16 AM  
They've always been Creemees in northern Vermont, and maple creemees are indeed farking delicious
 
2022-08-19 6:29:20 AM  
Fifty years ago mom would cook us boston scrod once a week, tasty flaky white fish, i loved the stuff. Difficulty : we 're on the other coast...
 
2022-08-19 8:33:56 AM  
Family owned an ice cream store in Western MA for a decade in the 80s and 90s.

If you ask for jimmies, you're getting chocolate ones.

If you ask for sprinkles, you're getting rainbow ones.
 
2022-08-19 7:22:59 PM  
CSB:
Went to visit my sister in Vermont. I was wandering around town, and ran across a hot dog cart. Being from the south, I asked for a coke (what kinda coke you want? Mello yello.) He asked if I wanted a gram or ball.
 
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