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(BBC-US)   Japan is trying to become Farkistan   (bbc.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Japanese media, Recent figures, future of sake, only problem, supply of younger staff, Japan's economy, tax agency show, quirky ideas  
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4400 clicks; posted to Main » and Business » on 18 Aug 2022 at 9:50 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-08-18 9:14:44 AM  
Fark needs to invade Japan and teach those farking youngsters how to drink, road trip!
 
2022-08-18 9:43:06 AM  
On it...

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-08-18 9:53:11 AM  
Japan is going through something similar to the US where the youth can't get ahead and now companies are sitting around like, "Where's our easy money?"
 
2022-08-18 9:53:13 AM  
Kampai!!!!!!
 
2022-08-18 9:54:21 AM  
Gentlemen, this is important.  The sake of the economy is in your hands.
 
2022-08-18 9:56:16 AM  
The younger generation drinks less alcohol than their parents

If you grew up around drinkers, the notion of spending money to be like them isn't really attractive.
 
2022-08-18 9:56:18 AM  
Now drink up, rummy!
 
2022-08-18 9:58:11 AM  
How does an increase in alcoholism, cirrhosis, liver cancer, traffic fatalities, hangover-related call-ins and farkups at work, and lifelong-regrettable phone calls help an economy?
 
2022-08-18 9:59:20 AM  

Hawk the Hawk: Gentlemen, this is important.  The sake of the economy is in your hands.


I see what you did there.....

/ haven't had sake in a long time
 
2022-08-18 10:00:09 AM  

Nullav: How does an increase in alcoholism, cirrhosis, liver cancer, traffic fatalities, hangover-related call-ins and farkups at work, and lifelong-regrettable phone calls help an economy?


Jobs in medicine and malpractice law are lucrative.
 
2022-08-18 10:01:02 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-08-18 10:03:56 AM  

Godscrack: [Fark user image 644x498]


DAS BOOT!
 
2022-08-18 10:05:00 AM  
Live like your proud ancestors!

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-08-18 10:13:37 AM  

HotWingConspiracy: The younger generation drinks less alcohol than their parents

If you grew up around drinkers, the notion of spending money to be like them isn't really attractive.


Neither of my parents drank much, but both worked as bartenders at various times. And I wound up with a genetic predisposition to disliking the taste of alcohol.
 
2022-08-18 10:17:03 AM  
Maybe they should stop being President Madagascar.
 
2022-08-18 10:18:57 AM  
The contest asks 20 to 39-year-olds to share their business ideas to kick-start demand among their peers...

So the campaign to boost demand is to have a contest to get people to submit ideas for a campaign to boost demand?  I'll drink to that.
 
2022-08-18 10:23:57 AM  

Nullav: How does an increase in alcoholism, cirrhosis, liver cancer, traffic fatalities, hangover-related call-ins and farkups at work, and lifelong-regrettable phone calls help an economy?


[slightsarcasm]

- Increase in alcoholism increases spend on alcohol, and people will also spend more money making poor/impulse buying decisions, as well as going out more
- Cirrhosis and liver cancer will ensure doctors have more to do and keeps them employed
- Traffic fatalities will keep EMTs and police employed, as well as mortuaries
- Hang-over related call-ins help weed out the riffraff
- Farkups at work allow people to remain busy fixing said farkups and stay employed
- Lifelong-regrettable phone calls help keep the cycle going and feeds articles on FARK

[/slightsarcasm]
 
2022-08-18 10:24:36 AM  

Nullav: How does an increase in alcoholism, cirrhosis, liver cancer, traffic fatalities, hangover-related call-ins and farkups at work, and lifelong-regrettable phone calls help an economy?


It lets them avoid a devastating small increase in tax rates for the rich.
 
2022-08-18 10:25:27 AM  
I stock at least three types of sake at my bar constantly. Gekkeikan Black and Gold and a few others. I do very much enjoy sake, it's my "I'm gonna finish this bottle and have a great time" drink of choice.
 
2022-08-18 10:26:21 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-08-18 10:43:16 AM  
Pretty sure there's a correlation between declining consumption of alcohol by younger adults and the lower birth rate.
 
2022-08-18 10:46:31 AM  
I guess their other sources of industry income aren't cutting it anymore.

aetre.xepher.netView Full Size
 
2022-08-18 10:48:54 AM  
Some of my nephews and nieces on my wife's side of the family are way ahead of the campaign.

The eldest niece is particularly impressive. She can guzzle the sake then wake up 7 hours later bright eyed and ready to go.
 
2022-08-18 11:02:24 AM  
Ahh... the benefits of having a proper mass transit system... you can actually make "drink up you bastards!" into a PSA.
 
2022-08-18 11:05:17 AM  
So going pool side in Vegas and getting so drunk the bellhops have to wheelchair you to your room is helping the economy. Alrighty then.
 
2022-08-18 11:09:03 AM  

HotWingConspiracy: The younger generation drinks less alcohol than their parents

If you grew up around drinkers, the notion of spending money to be like them isn't really attractive.


A puking drunk is no fun to be around
 
2022-08-18 11:09:34 AM  

Nullav: How does an increase in alcoholism, cirrhosis, liver cancer, traffic fatalities, hangover-related call-ins and farkups at work, and lifelong-regrettable phone calls help an economy?


Very good

Thread over
 
2022-08-18 11:11:03 AM  

Boojum2k: HotWingConspiracy: The younger generation drinks less alcohol than their parents

If you grew up around drinkers, the notion of spending money to be like them isn't really attractive.

Neither of my parents drank much, but both worked as bartenders at various times. And I wound up with a genetic predisposition to disliking the taste of alcohol.


It tastes even worse coming back up
 
2022-08-18 11:12:56 AM  

baronbloodbath: I stock at least three types of sake at my bar constantly. Gekkeikan Black and Gold and a few others. I do very much enjoy sake, it's my "I'm gonna finish this bottle and have a great time" drink of choice.


I like Blatts beer because thats the sound it makes hitting concrete when it comes back up.
 
2022-08-18 11:13:31 AM  
I just ordered some more sake. I am not Japanese and I am not young but I am doing my part.
 
2022-08-18 11:13:58 AM  

bbcard1: Pretty sure there's a correlation between declining consumption of alcohol by younger adults and the lower birth rate.


Booze babies

Too much booze will give u whisky dick
 
2022-08-18 11:15:00 AM  

chewd: Ahh... the benefits of having a proper mass transit system... you can actually make "drink up you bastards!" into a PSA.


Barfing on the subway is a real treat
 
2022-08-18 11:17:12 AM  

bbcard1: Pretty sure there's a correlation between declining consumption of alcohol by younger adults and the lower birth rate.


This is absolutely part of the thinking.

Japan's primary problem, is that a majority of their economy is tourism-driven.  Japan is still closed to foreign visitors (limited to a set number per month, and only allowed for bus tours).  Closed borders = less tourism = less money.  There has always been a strong internal-tourism economy, but that has taken a severe hit in recent decades and years**.  Japan does not have enough non-tourism industry to take up the slack.  Additionally, some places (such as Kyoto) have exhausted their finances due to horrible systemic mismanagement.

Their secondary problem is one of fear.  Not just fear of foreigners, but also fear of COVID.  Japan is an extremely grey country, and a serious COVID wave could completely hollow out their entire population.  They have very good reason to be afraid, but that fear means that even internally, people aren't traveling between prefectures as much as they used to, or clustering into places where normally there would be crowds.

The tertiary issue is one of brutal culture.  This is where the "**" comes into play.  Japanese workers are given a set number of vacation days per year, but they are strongly encouraged (essentially forced) to never take any of them.  The typical vacation is a single night away from home.  Drive out to a Ryokan, stay the night, then drive home.  Internal tourism has been suffocated under oppressive work culture.  You show up early, sit around trying to look busy for 12+ hours, then finally go home when the boss decides he's put up enough of an image of dedication.  Productivity is garbage, but hey, you are in the office for a long time, so you're obviously a hard worker.  If you take time off, you are breaking that team spirit, and deserve to be punished.  On top of this, you will likely have to go out drinking with your boss fairly regularly, where you will be up all hours of the night, only just manage to get brief sleep on the train, then have to turn right around and go back to the office to sit around and do nothing.  When you've only got a couple hours per week to yourself, how are you going to spend a bunch of time out at bars?

Quaternary: social culture in Japan is farked entirely.  Meeting people is a struggle.  Most of the people you're likely to meet are going to be your contemporaries at work.  Maintaining harmony at the office is more important than socializing.  Opening up to someone carries huge social ramifications.  And now here's where I think the push for young people to go out drinking is coming from: The only time you'll see Japanese people open up is when they're drunk.  Can't get young people to talk to one another?  Get them drunk together.  Between the cultural and social constructs of Japan, young people just can't easily get into serious relationships, or hell, even casual ones.  They don't want to get married or have kids, because life is already a struggle.  Solution?  Drunk sex and accidental pregnancy - cross your fingers that they'll choose to "do the right thing" and maybe kick them a secondary stipend to help with child care costs.

Japan has their own "Boomer" issue, and it's very literally killing their entire country.
 
2022-08-18 11:17:27 AM  

trappedspirit: The contest asks 20 to 39-year-olds to share their business ideas to kick-start demand among their peers...

So the campaign to boost demand is to have a contest to get people to submit ideas for a campaign to boost demand?  I'll drink to that.


It's a basic brainwash technique.
I make you part of the "solution" and you'll be more likely to support it, directly and indirectly, and less likely to question it or oppose it, even if your initial drive was just financial (winning the contest).
Even more so when your submission has to be offered publicly, on online platforms, since then it creates peer pressure towards the subject. (DNRTA, don't know if that's what's happening here).

My guess is that the old guard in government are just friends with the old money that own the alcohol factories.
 
2022-08-18 11:19:29 AM  

Kuroshin: bbcard1: Pretty sure there's a correlation between declining consumption of alcohol by younger adults and the lower birth rate.

This is absolutely part of the thinking.

Japan's primary problem, is that a majority of their economy is tourism-driven.  Japan is still closed to foreign visitors (limited to a set number per month, and only allowed for bus tours).  Closed borders = less tourism = less money.  There has always been a strong internal-tourism economy, but that has taken a severe hit in recent decades and years**.  Japan does not have enough non-tourism industry to take up the slack.  Additionally, some places (such as Kyoto) have exhausted their finances due to horrible systemic mismanagement.

Their secondary problem is one of fear.  Not just fear of foreigners, but also fear of COVID.  Japan is an extremely grey country, and a serious COVID wave could completely hollow out their entire population.  They have very good reason to be afraid, but that fear means that even internally, people aren't traveling between prefectures as much as they used to, or clustering into places where normally there would be crowds.

The tertiary issue is one of brutal culture.  This is where the "**" comes into play.  Japanese workers are given a set number of vacation days per year, but they are strongly encouraged (essentially forced) to never take any of them.  The typical vacation is a single night away from home.  Drive out to a Ryokan, stay the night, then drive home.  Internal tourism has been suffocated under oppressive work culture.  You show up early, sit around trying to look busy for 12+ hours, then finally go home when the boss decides he's put up enough of an image of dedication.  Productivity is garbage, but hey, you are in the office for a long time, so you're obviously a hard worker.  If you take time off, you are breaking that team spirit, and deserve to be punished.  On top of this, you will likely have to go out drinking with your boss fairly regularly, where you will be up all hours of the night, only just manage to get brief sleep on the train, then have to turn right around and go back to the office to sit around and do nothing.  When you've only got a couple hours per week to yourself, how are you going to spend a bunch of time out at bars?

Quaternary: social culture in Japan is farked entirely.  Meeting people is a struggle.  Most of the people you're likely to meet are going to be your contemporaries at work.  Maintaining harmony at the office is more important than socializing.  Opening up to someone carries huge social ramifications.  And now here's where I think the push for young people to go out drinking is coming from: The only time you'll see Japanese people open up is when they're drunk.  Can't get young people to talk to one another?  Get them drunk together.  Between the cultural and social constructs of Japan, young people just can't easily get into serious relationships, or hell, even casual ones.  They don't want to get married or have kids, because life is already a struggle.  Solution?  Drunk sex and accidental pregnancy - cross your fingers that they'll choose to "do the right thing" and maybe kick them a secondary stipend to help with child care costs.

Japan has their own "Boomer" issue, and it's very literally killing their entire country.


Living on an island tends to fuk with the mind.
Would explain japans history of fuking with others to get space and resources
 
2022-08-18 11:21:01 AM  

Kuroshin: bbcard1: Pretty sure there's a correlation between declining consumption of alcohol by younger adults and the lower birth rate.

This is absolutely part of the thinking.

Japan's primary problem, is that a majority of their economy is tourism-driven.  Japan is still closed to foreign visitors (limited to a set number per month, and only allowed for bus tours).  Closed borders = less tourism = less money.  There has always been a strong internal-tourism economy, but that has taken a severe hit in recent decades and years**.  Japan does not have enough non-tourism industry to take up the slack.  Additionally, some places (such as Kyoto) have exhausted their finances due to horrible systemic mismanagement.

Their secondary problem is one of fear.  Not just fear of foreigners, but also fear of COVID.  Japan is an extremely grey country, and a serious COVID wave could completely hollow out their entire population.  They have very good reason to be afraid, but that fear means that even internally, people aren't traveling between prefectures as much as they used to, or clustering into places where normally there would be crowds.

The tertiary issue is one of brutal culture.  This is where the "**" comes into play.  Japanese workers are given a set number of vacation days per year, but they are strongly encouraged (essentially forced) to never take any of them.  The typical vacation is a single night away from home.  Drive out to a Ryokan, stay the night, then drive home.  Internal tourism has been suffocated under oppressive work culture.  You show up early, sit around trying to look busy for 12+ hours, then finally go home when the boss decides he's put up enough of an image of dedication.  Productivity is garbage, but hey, you are in the office for a long time, so you're obviously a hard worker.  If you take time off, you are breaking that team spirit, and deserve to be punished.  On top of this, you will likely have to go out drinking with your boss fairly regularly, where you will be up all hours of the night, only just manage to get brief sleep on the train, then have to turn right around and go back to the office to sit around and do nothing.  When you've only got a couple hours per week to yourself, how are you going to spend a bunch of time out at bars?

Quaternary: social culture in Japan is farked entirely.  Meeting people is a struggle.  Most of the people you're likely to meet are going to be your contemporaries at work.  Maintaining harmony at the office is more important than socializing.  Opening up to someone carries huge social ramifications.  And now here's where I think the push for young people to go out drinking is coming from: The only time you'll see Japanese people open up is when they're drunk.  Can't get young people to talk to one another?  Get them drunk together.  Between the cultural and social constructs of Japan, young people just can't easily get into serious relationships, or hell, even casual ones.  They don't want to get married or have kids, because life is already a struggle.  Solution?  Drunk sex and accidental pregnancy - cross your fingers that they'll choose to "do the right thing" and maybe kick them a secondary stipend to help with child care costs.

Japan has their own "Boomer" issue, and it's very literally killing their entire country.


Get em drunk enough and theyll open up with a stream of vomit
 
2022-08-18 11:24:48 AM  

Nullav: How does an increase in alcoholism, cirrhosis, liver cancer, traffic fatalities, hangover-related call-ins and farkups at work, and lifelong-regrettable phone calls help an economy?


Clearly it generates profit for the beverage & healthcare industries.
 
2022-08-18 11:36:12 AM  

Kuroshin: bbcard1: Pretty sure there's a correlation between declining consumption of alcohol by younger adults and the lower birth rate.

This is absolutely part of the thinking.

Japan's primary problem, is that a majority of their economy is tourism-driven.  Japan is still closed to foreign visitors (limited to a set number per month, and only allowed for bus tours).  Closed borders = less tourism = less money.  There has always been a strong internal-tourism economy, but that has taken a severe hit in recent decades and years**.  Japan does not have enough non-tourism industry to take up the slack.  Additionally, some places (such as Kyoto) have exhausted their finances due to horrible systemic mismanagement.

Their secondary problem is one of fear.  Not just fear of foreigners, but also fear of COVID.  Japan is an extremely grey country, and a serious COVID wave could completely hollow out their entire population.  They have very good reason to be afraid, but that fear means that even internally, people aren't traveling between prefectures as much as they used to, or clustering into places where normally there would be crowds.

The tertiary issue is one of brutal culture.  This is where the "**" comes into play.  Japanese workers are given a set number of vacation days per year, but they are strongly encouraged (essentially forced) to never take any of them.  The typical vacation is a single night away from home.  Drive out to a Ryokan, stay the night, then drive home.  Internal tourism has been suffocated under oppressive work culture.  You show up early, sit around trying to look busy for 12+ hours, then finally go home when the boss decides he's put up enough of an image of dedication.  Productivity is garbage, but hey, you are in the office for a long time, so you're obviously a hard worker.  If you take time off, you are breaking that team spirit, and deserve to be punished.  On top of this, you will likely have to go out drinking with your boss fairly regularly, where you will be up all hours of the night, only just manage to get brief sleep on the train, then have to turn right around and go back to the office to sit around and do nothing.  When you've only got a couple hours per week to yourself, how are you going to spend a bunch of time out at bars?

Quaternary: social culture in Japan is farked entirely.  Meeting people is a struggle.  Most of the people you're likely to meet are going to be your contemporaries at work.  Maintaining harmony at the office is more important than socializing.  Opening up to someone carries huge social ramifications.  And now here's where I think the push for young people to go out drinking is coming from: The only time you'll see Japanese people open up is when they're drunk.  Can't get young people to talk to one another?  Get them drunk together.  Between the cultural and social constructs of Japan, young people just can't easily get into serious relationships, or hell, even casual ones.  They don't want to get married or have kids, because life is already a struggle.  Solution?  Drunk sex and accidental pregnancy - cross your fingers that they'll choose to "do the right thing" and maybe kick them a secondary stipend to help with child care costs.

Japan has their own "Boomer" issue, and it's very literally killing their entire country.


Social culture there also destroys marriages. Once men get married, they essentially treat their wives like their own mothers. Not just as domestic appliances, but a lack of sex. Another reason for decreased birth rates (also a theme in my favorite Japanese soap opera, "Love affairs in the afternoon".) are these hollow relationships between men and women. As such there is a decent industry for gigilos who cater to lonely wives who crave both physical and emotional intimacy which their husbands are incapable of providing due to social norms.

I've read that Japanese themselves, due to birth rates alone, are slated for extinction in about 250 years or so.
 
2022-08-18 11:49:47 AM  

Aetre: I guess their other sources of industry income aren't cutting it anymore.

[aetre.xepher.net image 568x960]


wompampsupport.azureedge.netView Full Size
 
2022-08-18 11:50:35 AM  

Lambskincoat: Fark needs to invade Japan and teach those farking youngsters how to drink, road trip!


You can't exactly get to Japan via road trip...
 
2022-08-18 11:56:03 AM  

The Brains: Japan is going through something similar to the US where the youth can't get ahead and now companies are sitting around like, "Where's our easy money?"


This.

All day this.   Plus I wouldn't be surprised if Japan's target audience remembers never seeing their father the salaryman and the drinking culture he either enjoyed and/or was forced into and said, "fark that".
 
2022-08-18 11:57:56 AM  

bbcard1: Pretty sure there's a correlation between declining consumption of alcohol by younger adults and the lower birth rate.


Eh, as I understand, there isn't anything close to the same hook-up culture there as there is in the West. I think the lower birth rate is largely attributable to the toxic work culture where overtime is expected on a regular basis and vacations are frowned upon.
 
2022-08-18 1:01:41 PM  

Publikwerks: Nullav: How does an increase in alcoholism, cirrhosis, liver cancer, traffic fatalities, hangover-related call-ins and farkups at work, and lifelong-regrettable phone calls help an economy?

Jobs in medicine and malpractice law are lucrative.


Also collecting the liquor taxes is important to the State.
 
2022-08-18 1:04:32 PM  

Linux_Yes: chewd: Ahh... the benefits of having a proper mass transit system... you can actually make "drink up you bastards!" into a PSA.

Barfing on the subway is a real treat


I barfed on the subway once...
.... nobody died.
 
yms
2022-08-18 1:20:26 PM  
What a pint of Japanese beer might look like:

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-08-18 1:21:52 PM  
th.bing.comView Full Size
 
2022-08-18 1:35:26 PM  
リカー? 私は彼女を知りません。 [Translation: "Liquor? I don't even know her."]
 
2022-08-18 1:45:31 PM  

chewd: Linux_Yes: chewd: Ahh... the benefits of having a proper mass transit system... you can actually make "drink up you bastards!" into a PSA.

Barfing on the subway is a real treat

I barfed on the subway once...
.... nobody died.


I bet a few who smelled it wanted to
 
2022-08-18 2:36:42 PM  
So, poor people should spend more of their scant cash on booze so that the rich people can point and say "look how they waste all their money! Buying BOOZE!"

How about paying better wages so that the people on the bottom can buy more stuff (even stuff that's not booze). Spending money is what makes the economy go. Hoarding money takes it out of the economy and slows it down. Thus rich people being rich and getting richer is a drag to the economy.
 
2022-08-18 3:50:22 PM  

Claude Ballse: Social culture there also destroys marriages. Once men get married, they essentially treat their wives like their own mothers. Not just as domestic appliances, but a lack of sex. Another reason for decreased birth rates (also a theme in my favorite Japanese soap opera, "Love affairs in the afternoon".) are these hollow relationships between men and women. As such there is a decent industry for gigilos who cater to lonely wives who crave both physical and emotional intimacy which their husbands are incapable of providing due to social norms.

I've read that Japanese themselves, due to birth rates alone, are slated for extinction in about 250 years or so.


I've said it before - Japan is what happens to a society when men & women realize that they don't actually like each other all that much.
 
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