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(ABC7 Los Angeles)   Trying to have a real life outside of work? That's called quiet quitting, and you should be ashamed of yourself for daring to assume there's life outside of work   (abc7.com) divider line
    More: Murica, Employment, corporate job, work-life balance, quiet quitting, Rebecca Jarvis, Clayton Farris, Paige West, growing workplace trend  
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938 clicks; posted to Business » on 17 Aug 2022 at 7:20 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



43 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-08-17 7:32:43 AM  
Employees dialing it in and not building their skills won't have a job once the next recession hits.  Then they will be older and will find out the other problem, that they won't be hired for those lower level jobs over 22 year old college grads or under 30 managers looking to change employers to increase their salary.
There are always government jobs if you can get them that only require the minimum effort, they don't pay great but it's steady work.
 
2022-08-17 7:37:02 AM  
I've got guys on my team that take PTO, and then work. It would be funny if they were productive employees, but they're not.

One new hire, logged into a call I was hosting in order to try and take it over, and "concern" over the subjects. I was having the call because of things he didn't do.

Needless to say, I do absolutely less than I need to, and it's still more than these dipshiats on my team working on vacation.
 
2022-08-17 7:41:02 AM  
I thought this was a repeat, but when I found TFA from 10 days ago, it's completely different. So worse, this "quiet quitting" term is gaining traction among talking heads.
 
2022-08-17 7:54:35 AM  

Northern: Employees dialing it in and not building their skills won't have a job once the next recession hits.  Then they will be older and will find out the other problem, that they won't be hired for those lower level jobs over 22 year old college grads or under 30 managers looking to change employers to increase their salary.
There are always government jobs if you can get them that only require the minimum effort, they don't pay great but it's steady work.


I know, these people who only work the hours they are paid, and don't do any free work for their employers. What a bunch of parasites.

Next they will be expecting to be able to use the PTO they have in their contracts.
 
2022-08-17 7:58:19 AM  

Cajnik: I thought this was a repeat, but when I found TFA from 10 days ago, it's completely different. So worse, this "quiet quitting" term is gaining traction among talking heads.


I "quietly quit" after spending a couple years trying to do my best and stay out of trouble, until I realized that they would always take more no matter what wimpy objections I or the union raised, "business needs" could actually supersede the law.
 
2022-08-17 8:04:51 AM  

Northern: Employees dialing it in and not building their skills won't have a job once the next recession hits.  Then they will be older and will find out the other problem, that they won't be hired for those lower level jobs over 22 year old college grads or under 30 managers looking to change employers to increase their salary.
There are always government jobs if you can get them that only require the minimum effort, they don't pay great but it's steady work.


All those "consequences" you're talking about are going to happen whether you bust ass or not.

Employers have no loyalty. Very few reward effort. They'll happily shiatcan an "expensive" worker for a cheaper moron.

Spend your energy accordingly.

The best thing the American worker could ever learn is "Fark you. Pay me."
 
2022-08-17 8:07:47 AM  
"So I decided to scale that back and really just do the work that was required of me."


That's not quiet, or any other kind of quitting.  That's doing what you are paid to do.
 
2022-08-17 8:17:55 AM  
The worst situation is to have a boss with no life outside of work.  They drive a lot problems by constantly pestering their workers off-hours.  Not a problem for me these days though.  I'm on a fixed 40 hour week.  If they want more, hours out of me, they'll need to pay me.  While the extra money would be nice, it would cut into my enjoyable non-work activities.
 
2022-08-17 8:19:24 AM  

Norfolking Chance: Northern: Employees dialing it in and not building their skills won't have a job once the next recession hits.  Then they will be older and will find out the other problem, that they won't be hired for those lower level jobs over 22 year old college grads or under 30 managers looking to change employers to increase their salary.
There are always government jobs if you can get them that only require the minimum effort, they don't pay great but it's steady work.

I know, these people who only work the hours they are paid, and don't do any free work for their employers. What a bunch of parasites.

Next they will be expecting to be able to use the PTO they have in their contracts.


I ate 120 hours of PTO one year, my assistant's life went to garbage and she became too unreliable for me to take off, and I didn't trust any of my workers with the manager that would have had to cover for me because my workers were making her look really bad.  I did let my boss know that would not be happening again.  Honestly, I've got my team to where they don't even need a manager most days.

I do make sure my workers use all of their PTO and towards the end of the year I start telling people to take off, we're usually pretty slow in December anyway.  I did have one guy lose a day because he saved virtually all of his PTO for the end of the year, then he got Jury duty after he had worked his last day of the year.
 
2022-08-17 8:21:55 AM  
Speak to your micromanaging pidgeon supervisor about it?  Rofl, hell no.
 
2022-08-17 8:30:41 AM  

Cajnik: I thought this was a repeat, but when I found TFA from 10 days ago, it's completely different. So worse, this "quiet quitting" term is gaining traction among talking heads.


Well, yes. This is how they're going to get you back into the office, y'see. If you're working remotely, well, they're going to become more invasive - not just in terms of surreptitious monitoring of your hardware, but in overt monitoring of your psychological state.

That's why all these "mindfulness" corporate apps are suddenly appearing. You're looking at a data gathering tool in which the information gained is then fed into a model to determine the likelihood of your imminent departure, allowing the company to either fire you pre-emptively or manipulate you into overt resignation long before your clear inability to express your commitment to Sparkle Motion becomes a liability to the company.

The true role of middle management is to provide a steady stream of worker assessment. That's harder to do with a remote workforce, so new tools and terms are being rolled out in an attempt to give middle managers something to do.
 
2022-08-17 8:33:31 AM  
The risk of quiet quitting, according to Jarvis, is that an employee who is less invested in their job may be "more likely to be laid off in a down economy."

The alternative is to work your ass off and risk *still* getting laid off because you/your contribution is not valued correctly.
 
2022-08-17 8:35:01 AM  
Now, I work 40 hrs a week and cannot take my work home with me.
It wasn't always this way.
This is better.  So very, very much better.

For managers; if "quiet quitting" is a problem, treat your people with more respect.  The most sincere forms of respect show up in the paycheck, and firing morons.
(Another excellent thing about my current job; if someone isn't meeting the standards, they are allowed to explore new career options. Just not here.  You are never covering for an idiot the boss won't fire.  And no, we aren't in constant fear, we are appreciated & respected.)
 
2022-08-17 8:43:31 AM  

Boudyro: Northern: Employees dialing it in and not building their skills won't have a job once the next recession hits.  Then they will be older and will find out the other problem, that they won't be hired for those lower level jobs over 22 year old college grads or under 30 managers looking to change employers to increase their salary.
There are always government jobs if you can get them that only require the minimum effort, they don't pay great but it's steady work.

All those "consequences" you're talking about are going to happen whether you bust ass or not.

Employers have no loyalty. Very few reward effort. They'll happily shiatcan an "expensive" worker for a cheaper moron.

Spend your energy accordingly.

The best thing the American worker could ever learn is "Fark you. Pay me."



What would be nice is if hard work, *actual* hard work was properly rewarded in all cases but it simply isn't.  The older I get, the more I see that there is a cut off point where hard work equals reward and getting higher pay and position is more a function of circumstance or luck than hard work.
 
2022-08-17 8:43:38 AM  

Northern: Employees dialing it in and not building their skills won't have a job once the next recession hits.  Then they will be older and will find out the other problem, that they won't be hired for those lower level jobs over 22 year old college grads or under 30 managers looking to change employers to increase their salary.
There are always government jobs if you can get them that only require the minimum effort, they don't pay great but it's steady work.


c.tenor.comView Full Size
 
2022-08-17 8:51:39 AM  

UberDave: What would be nice is if hard work, *actual* hard work was properly rewarded in all cases but it simply isn't.  The older I get, the more I see that there is a cut off point where hard work equals reward and getting higher pay and position is more a function of circumstance or luck than hard work.


You'd also be shocked how many workers don't understand "work smarter, not harder".  A worker that gets more done in 40 hours than another worker does in 60 is still the better worker.
 
2022-08-17 8:56:35 AM  

Northern: Employees dialing it in and not building their skills won't have a job once the next recession hits.  Then they will be older and will find out the other problem, that they won't be hired for those lower level jobs over 22 year old college grads or under 30 managers looking to change employers to increase their salary.
There are always government jobs if you can get them that only require the minimum effort, they don't pay great but it's steady work.


LOL
 
2022-08-17 9:01:52 AM  
It's like a quiet riot.
 
2022-08-17 9:11:52 AM  

Cajnik: I thought this was a repeat, but when I found TFA from 10 days ago, it's completely different. So worse, this "quiet quitting" term is gaining traction among talking heads.


It was one of many topics Laura Ingraham was ranting on last night.

something about work ethic and how working hard for no benefit is a good thing. thru in some "real men do hard work" toxic crap too.
 
2022-08-17 9:13:40 AM  

electricjebus: UberDave: What would be nice is if hard work, *actual* hard work was properly rewarded in all cases but it simply isn't.  The older I get, the more I see that there is a cut off point where hard work equals reward and getting higher pay and position is more a function of circumstance or luck than hard work.

You'd also be shocked how many workers don't understand "work smarter, not harder".  A worker that gets more done in 40 hours than another worker does in 60 is still the better worker.


That also applies. Perhaps I should have said "productive".  In my statement, "hard work" includes smarter/productive work.  The point was that being highly productive and more productive than your bosses ever were is often (if not more often) not rewarded as it should be

And if you're talking about getting rewarded for doing things in a fraction of the time it takes anyone else to do that....well, I think that is rewarded even less than being on site for 60 hours.

Work a job where you can do 60 hours of work in 15 hours but still work the 60 hours and get Jack and Shiat for it.  That's fun.  Or worse, you get static that you worked 60 hours because you can't get it done in 40 when it is *clear* that you did something that would have taken anyone else in the office a month-plus to accomplish.
 
2022-08-17 9:14:23 AM  

electricjebus: UberDave: What would be nice is if hard work, *actual* hard work was properly rewarded in all cases but it simply isn't.  The older I get, the more I see that there is a cut off point where hard work equals reward and getting higher pay and position is more a function of circumstance or luck than hard work.

You'd also be shocked how many workers don't understand "work smarter, not harder".  A worker that gets more done in 40 hours than another worker does in 60 is still the better worker.


You'd also be shocked how many managers don't understand "work smarter, not harder"....

"But he's more loyal to the Company!!! He's here 60 hours a week!"  ...with an hour & a half lunch, a two hour gym break, and three and a half hours of social media, job hunting, Fark, and work on his side hustle every day.  As opposed to the guy who quietly gives an honest six and a half hours of work every day, but is in the office only 40 hrs a week.  And would do more if it weren't for your stupid, bloated mandatory training and all of Karen's "meetings" that could have been emails.
 
2022-08-17 9:15:48 AM  

bighairyguy: The worst situation is to have a boss with no life outside of work. They drive a lot problems by constantly pestering their workers off-hours.  Not a problem for me these days though.  I'm on a fixed 40 hour week.  If they want more, hours out of me, they'll need to pay me.  While the extra money would be nice, it would cut into my enjoyable non-work activities.


that is the case for my new boss (was passed over for him, still pissed at it).  I get emails from him 10pm, midnight, weekends.

I don't respond to any of them. I just feel sad for him now and trying like hell to get out.

The bosses are in meetings so much during the day, they can only get work done at night. ha. I never expect a response to my emails until after 5pm.
 
2022-08-17 9:17:16 AM  
Apparently, I quietly quit on the dietary day of my first job and have never been back. Someone should tell my bosses, because they were always happy with my work and considered that to be "doing my job". I clock in, I clock out. If you need me outside of normal work hours sometimes, sure, but you pay me for 40 hours/week and you will get no more than that.
 
2022-08-17 9:45:09 AM  

Northern: Employees dialing it in and not building their skills won't have a job once the next recession hits.  Then they will be older and will find out the other problem, that they won't be hired for those lower level jobs over 22 year old college grads or under 30 managers looking to change employers to increase their salary.
There are always government jobs if you can get them that only require the minimum effort, they don't pay great but it's steady work.


Speaking of minimal effort, that post was a shining example of it.
 
2022-08-17 9:58:13 AM  
One of the things I tell new workers is to learn their worth. 

If anyone offers you less, tell them to fark off.
 
2022-08-17 9:58:51 AM  
You always know the Powers That Be are getting really scared of the leverage the average worker has right now when the number of propaganda articles like this start flowing like a veritable river of shiat.

"You're doing the job you're getting paid to do without giving your benevolent overlords additional free labor? How dare you! Don't you care about Job Creators (praise be unto them)? Can't you see if the CEO doesn't get a new yacht they'll look foolish compared to the other CEOs at their club?"
 
2022-08-17 10:09:33 AM  
pbs.twimg.comView Full Size
 
2022-08-17 10:21:25 AM  

Hyjamon: bighairyguy: The worst situation is to have a boss with no life outside of work. They drive a lot problems by constantly pestering their workers off-hours.  Not a problem for me these days though.  I'm on a fixed 40 hour week.  If they want more, hours out of me, they'll need to pay me.  While the extra money would be nice, it would cut into my enjoyable non-work activities.

that is the case for my new boss (was passed over for him, still pissed at it).  I get emails from him 10pm, midnight, weekends.

I don't respond to any of them. I just feel sad for him now and trying like hell to get out.

The bosses are in meetings so much during the day, they can only get work done at night. ha. I never expect a response to my emails until after 5pm.


You can schedule emails to be delivered.
 
2022-08-17 10:25:23 AM  

Northern: Employees dialing it in and not building their skills won't have a job once the next recession hits.  Then they will be older and will find out the other problem, that they won't be hired for those lower level jobs over 22 year old college grads or under 30 managers looking to change employers to increase their salary.
There are always government jobs if you can get them that only require the minimum effort, they don't pay great but it's steady work.


No, that's just you.
 
2022-08-17 10:54:04 AM  
"Always meets every expectation" and "Only does the bare minimum" are the same thing from different managers.
 
2022-08-17 10:55:00 AM  
Nobody ever complained on their deathbed that they didn't spend enough time at the office.
 
2022-08-17 11:04:45 AM  
Work-life balance isn't 'quitting.' It's preserving your sanity. And if you're in management, and you're not compartmentalizing pieces of your life, you're bringing in the agita from one or the other, and it's affecting both.

There's a difference between just sort of doing bare minimum, and just doing the job without a lot of fanfare. It's not going to get you promoted fast, but it will be appreciated that you can do the job, and clear out objectives in a solid fashion that can be counted on. Employers are hoping you'll be a real go-getter who is super productive so that they can benefit from the labor, without commiserate reward. Nothing wrong with being solid and dependable. NOT volunteering to take on more than you need to isn't quitting, it's just declaring that you want to do the job and then go home. Trying to cast this as 'quitting' is essentially trying to shame folks into thinking that they should volunteer to do more for the same wages, and up their productivity past the point that's expected, and maintain that without a raise or reward. Which is bullsh*t. Don't get mad because people spotted your bullsh*t.
 
2022-08-17 11:33:55 AM  

Laobaojun: You'd also be shocked how many managers don't understand "work smarter, not harder"....

"But he's more loyal to the Company!!! He's here 60 hours a week!"  ...with an hour & a half lunch, a two hour gym break, and three and a half hours of social media, job hunting, Fark, and work on his side hustle every day.  As opposed to the guy who quietly gives an honest six and a half hours of work every day, but is in the office only 40 hrs a week.  And would do more if it weren't for your stupid, bloated mandatory training and all of Karen's "meetings" that could have been emails.


I'm not loyal to the company, I only put in applications for better jobs, my benefits are really good, but a couple other companies have my resume... and if they're willing to pay me more I'm out.  I wouldn't expect any more out of my workers.

I'd much rather a worker go home than waste my time and I like to give them enough rope to hang themselves with.  It makes my job easier.
 
2022-08-17 12:54:53 PM  

TedCruz'sCrazyDad: Hyjamon: bighairyguy: The worst situation is to have a boss with no life outside of work. They drive a lot problems by constantly pestering their workers off-hours.  Not a problem for me these days though.  I'm on a fixed 40 hour week.  If they want more, hours out of me, they'll need to pay me.  While the extra money would be nice, it would cut into my enjoyable non-work activities.

that is the case for my new boss (was passed over for him, still pissed at it).  I get emails from him 10pm, midnight, weekends.

I don't respond to any of them. I just feel sad for him now and trying like hell to get out.

The bosses are in meetings so much during the day, they can only get work done at night. ha. I never expect a response to my emails until after 5pm.

You can schedule emails to be delivered.


I am familiar with the "send at a later time" feature. I enjoy it and use it quite a bit. Not sure how that applies to my situation.

If I send my boss an email at 9am, I won't get a reply back until after 5pm. Sometimes well past 5pm. A peer mentioned him sending an email at 2:30am. "I am a night person, like to get things done when they are on my mind".

Receive an agenda before the meeting? have yet to experience that with over a year of working for him, but hey he has an MBA in management.  Management of what? I have no idea.
 
2022-08-17 12:56:03 PM  
When my manager can do his job as well as I do my job, then he can start preaching about how I'm not contributing enough or failing as a profit center. If I want to throw away all my spare time and energy, I can start my own business.
 
2022-08-17 12:57:40 PM  

TedCruz'sCrazyDad: I don't respond to any of them. I just feel sad for him now and trying like hell to get out.

The bosses are in meetings so much during the day, they can only get work done at night. ha. I never expect a response to my emails until after 5pm.

You can schedule emails to be delivered.


ahh, re-read it and gotcha now. Yea, I am not sending an email at 11pm on a Saturday night.  if I am required to be in the office from 8:30-5:30 M-F, then that is when I will reply.
 
2022-08-17 1:05:37 PM  

psychosis_inducing: "Always meets every expectation" and "Only does the bare minimum" are the same thing from different managers.


ha, so true.

opening meeting of the year when there have been no raises in the past couple.

New Big Boss: "I want everyone to try harder to get better ratings on your evaluations this year"
Old timer DGAF: "Why?"

New Big Boss was just stunned stupid for a few seconds, really wasn't expecting that. Mumbled out something about better serving our customers and taking pride in our work.  Absolutely clueless.

This years big idea for retention: awards!  pdf certificates with your name on them (after an arduous application process)
 
2022-08-17 1:18:24 PM  

hubiestubert: Work-life balance isn't 'quitting.' It's preserving your sanity. And if you're in management, and you're not compartmentalizing pieces of your life, you're bringing in the agita from one or the other, and it's affecting both.

There's a difference between just sort of doing bare minimum, and just doing the job without a lot of fanfare. It's not going to get you promoted fast, but it will be appreciated that you can do the job, and clear out objectives in a solid fashion that can be counted on. Employers are hoping you'll be a real go-getter who is super productive so that they can benefit from the labor, without commiserate reward. Nothing wrong with being solid and dependable. NOT volunteering to take on more than you need to isn't quitting, it's just declaring that you want to do the job and then go home. Trying to cast this as 'quitting' is essentially trying to shame folks into thinking that they should volunteer to do more for the same wages, and up their productivity past the point that's expected, and maintain that without a raise or reward. Which is bullsh*t. Don't get mad because people spotted your bullsh*t.


This is especially true and doubly poisonous for educators. Because there if you don't do a ton of extra work it means you don't love the children.
 
2022-08-17 1:19:02 PM  
Doing the work required of you is called working. Wtf is this quiet quitting nonsense?
 
2022-08-17 7:50:14 PM  
Hahahahahahahaha haha haha ha!

I stopped reading email last year. I stopped because I realized it was my only source of stress. I told people to just call me if they need something done. I used to check it to see if I missed something important, but nope. If it is important, someone will call me.

I barely work anymore. I've started a worm farm!

/25,000+ unread emails
 
2022-08-17 8:23:54 PM  

Norfolking Chance: Northern: Employees dialing it in and not building their skills won't have a job once the next recession hits.  Then they will be older and will find out the other problem, that they won't be hired for those lower level jobs over 22 year old college grads or under 30 managers looking to change employers to increase their salary.
There are always government jobs if you can get them that only require the minimum effort, they don't pay great but it's steady work.

I know, these people who only work the hours they are paid, and don't do any free work for their employers. What a bunch of parasites.

Next they will be expecting to be able to use the PTO they have in their contracts.


*raises hand* For the first time in my working history, my workload is fair. I can do my job (quite well!) and the load is spread out between an appropriate and trained staff. I'm 2 months in and learning to cross-train with the other people so anybody can take a vacation without the existential dread of coming back.

I'm a contract worker. I work for a consulting company related to consumer finance, and everything is hammered out. This is your job, this is your pay, you qualify for these benefits, and you may take vacation under these circumstances. Ironically, I almost feel like union protection at times.

"This is exactly your job. They do not have the authority to make you do anything outside of your work. If someone tries, politely refuse. If they try again, call this number. If they want you to do more work, they'll pay for it and we'll train you"
 
2022-08-18 12:33:44 AM  

ThighsofGlory: Northern: Employees dialing it in and not building their skills won't have a job once the next recession hits.  Then they will be older and will find out the other problem, that they won't be hired for those lower level jobs over 22 year old college grads or under 30 managers looking to change employers to increase their salary.
There are always government jobs if you can get them that only require the minimum effort, they don't pay great but it's steady work.

No, that's just you.


Me what?  I am not in a government job.  My statement is simply that workers in their late 20s or early 30s who dial it in likely won't survive the next recession, and will likely find it difficult to find a replacement job in the same industry.
Is that controversial?
 
2022-08-18 6:16:18 AM  
I suppose it's better than using an AR-15 to quit
 
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