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(WTOP)   FDA gives the green light to over-the-counter aids for mild to moderate hearing loss, going on sale this fall   (wtop.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Associated Press, Food and Drug Administration, Over-the-counter drug, Prescription drug, Howard Hughes, new regulation cuts, Dr. Jeffrey Shuren, new class of hearing aids  
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365 clicks; posted to STEM » on 16 Aug 2022 at 8:17 PM (15 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-08-16 8:50:48 PM  
8 votes:

flamark: I have about 40% hearing loss in both ears due to genetics, age (66YO) and exposure to loud sounds (MUSIC and AIRPLANES). Today, my wife convinced me to go to an audiologist which she's wanted me to do for a while. The audiologist did a hearing test confirming my hearing loss and started to fit me with hearing aids. The technology looks like something from the 1950s ... iron-lung-good-looks ... over the back of the ear and very noticeable. She said there were three levels of technology in hearing aids, cheap ($3800), moderate ($4800) and hi-tech ($5800). The hi-tech versions incorporated new technologies and were expensive because they were "rechargeable" and used new fangled "2.4 Ghz Bluetooth technology". She also bragged that the computer chips were made so small they could fit into the "over the ear" device and could make "12 million calculations" per second. (SHOOO DOGGIE) Anyhow, I get home tonight and  see the news about the FDA's decision. So, my question fellow farkers, does anyone have experience with current hearing-aid technology and what is the best options currently available?


Go to Costco. We got my mom a pair of very small over-the-ear, rechargeable hearing aids for $2K, and the audiologist couldn't have been more helpful. I ended up having to take Mom back several times as she didn't like the earpieces, but they do a custom earpiece where they take a mold of your ear canal. She couldn't do the smallest in-ear-only aids, both because her hearing loss wasn't in the range they're made for, and those didn't come in the rechargeable variety.

I will say, as strongly as I can, get 'em. Get 'em now. Hearing loss is socially isolating, and social isolation is very strongly correlated with dementia. If you're got a family history of Alzheimers or other form of dementia, you need to stay on top of your hearing.
 
2022-08-16 7:36:55 PM  
1 vote:
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-08-16 8:38:22 PM  
1 vote:
I have about 40% hearing loss in both ears due to genetics, age (66YO) and exposure to loud sounds (MUSIC and AIRPLANES). Today, my wife convinced me to go to an audiologist which she's wanted me to do for a while. The audiologist did a hearing test confirming my hearing loss and started to fit me with hearing aids. The technology looks like something from the 1950s ... iron-lung-good-looks ... over the back of the ear and very noticeable. She said there were three levels of technology in hearing aids, cheap ($3800), moderate ($4800) and hi-tech ($5800). The hi-tech versions incorporated new technologies and were expensive because they were "rechargeable" and used new fangled "2.4 Ghz Bluetooth technology". She also bragged that the computer chips were made so small they could fit into the "over the ear" device and could make "12 million calculations" per second. (SHOOO DOGGIE) Anyhow, I get home tonight and  see the news about the FDA's decision. So, my question fellow farkers, does anyone have experience with current hearing-aid technology and what is the best options currently available?
 
2022-08-16 9:16:35 PM  
1 vote:

Pointy Tail of Satan: WHAT? WHAT?


c.tenor.comView Full Size
 
2022-08-16 11:06:20 PM  
1 vote:

morg: What's that thing they're selling on daytime tv ads then?


Quoth the article: 'Consumer electronic companies for years have produced lower-cost "personal sound amplification" devices, but they do not undergo FDA review and U.S. regulations bar them from being marketed as hearing aids.'
 
2022-08-16 11:57:18 PM  
1 vote:

Mabman: morg: What's that thing they're selling on daytime tv ads then?

Quoth the article: 'Consumer electronic companies for years have produced lower-cost "personal sound amplification" devices, but they do not undergo FDA review and U.S. regulations bar them from being marketed as hearing aids.'


The reason for FDA is that if you just boost all frequencies, there is the risk that it will damage ones that still work well. I'm not sure if that is true or not and considering how many people are using headphones these days, I'm not sure if that is a legitimate argument even if it were true.  I think the FDA got into the hearing aid regulation business when the cheap portable transistor AM radios first came out in the early 60s or so. Those had unregulated feedback loops that put the full battery current into the speakers in the ear.

The cheap electronics place in China I occasionally use has some over the ear type that are US$37 for a pair but are only good for a +10 dB boost but claims "High quality Digital chop", "Double noise Reduction" and don't forget "After-sales sewice".  Yes After-sales SeWice".  Those are 48 hour life with 2 hour recharge.  What they don't allow is frequency control to boot some ranges and not others.
 
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