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(The Register)   Another day, Another update from Microsoft that completely borks your pc   (theregister.com) divider line
    More: Fail, BIOS, Extensible Firmware Interface, Booting, BitLocker problems, Firmware, Windows users, Open Firmware, Register reader Anthony  
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1409 clicks; posted to STEM » on 15 Aug 2022 at 3:27 PM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



19 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-08-15 3:30:06 PM  
Is this the one where the ONLY thing your computer will run is the Anti-malware service?
 
2022-08-15 4:00:12 PM  
*Laughs in Arch*
 
2022-08-15 4:12:29 PM  
that's why I put a complete lockout on ALL Win10 updates on one computer which is still on 1803, and pulled another computer completely offline.
 
2022-08-15 4:34:25 PM  
static01.nyt.comView Full Size
 
2022-08-15 4:42:11 PM  
This isn't good of course but if the contents of your drive are important enough to secure with bit locker than the encryption key is important enough to store in last pass. Or at least in a file backup up to the cloud somewhere.
 
2022-08-15 4:51:11 PM  
THIS is obviously the year of the Linux desktop.
 
2022-08-15 4:51:45 PM  

Dry Spell: This isn't good of course but if the contents of your drive are important enough to secure with bit locker than the encryption key is important enough to store in last pass. Or at least in a file backup up to the cloud somewhere.


Yep. This is a combo of third-party reticence and user error, being blamed on Microsoft.

If you've encrypted a drive with BitLocker, it is up to you to have your recovery key stored somewhere OTHER THAN ON YOUR PC. Print the damned thing. Back it up to a thumb drive. Store it on another, different PC. Just don't whine when BitLocker goes into recovery and you say, "...but I don't have the key that it told me, without equivocation, would be the only way I could recover that drive..."
 
2022-08-15 4:55:51 PM  
And the KB article's pretty clear that much of this sits on the shoulders of OEM & UEFI folks.
 
2022-08-15 5:11:53 PM  

FormlessOne: And the KB article's pretty clear that much of this sits on the shoulders of OEM & UEFI folks.


Sounds more like the UFIA folks.
 
2022-08-15 5:15:24 PM  
Happily running Mint 20.3
 
2022-08-15 7:10:16 PM  
Getting your key is simple  as just accessing your account from another device.
 
2022-08-15 8:31:17 PM  
Anthony told us he was able to log into Azure and retrieve the recovery keys.

"This is the sort of thing the average user would certainly not be able to do," he said. "For some of them it was easy, for others it was a detective game to find out which licence was assigned to which computer."


Then Anthony snt very good at this. It's only a pain if you don't have a uniform naming convention. Then, all you have to know is the user. You look up the user, and then you find all of the devices they've logged in with. If there are multiple devices, you eliminate any that haven't checked in for a couple of days.

It would be a pain in the ass, but not a "detective game" if your shiat is set up in any way that makes sense.
 
2022-08-15 8:35:43 PM  

Flowery Twats: Happily running Mint 20.3


Sure, that would be great.

If people would start farking making their apps work on Linux. Also, I have had the biggest pain in the ass on Linux with networked drives. I've hopped thru so many hoops I feel like a trained seal in the circus. Finally, I just switched to Windows and not only do my apps work, but my networked drive is always available.

I'll circle back some day, but that networked drive thing really IS a pain in the ass. Mint and Elementary are both good, user friendly, Linux builds, but they still have issues that I don't encounter in Windows.
 
2022-08-15 10:11:40 PM  

Mikey1969: Also, I have had the biggest pain in the ass on Linux with networked drives.


I'm playing a video file off a network drive right this second. The drive automounts at boot time and I only had to set it up once. It's a SMB share, to boot.

I can replicate this behavior on GNOME, KDE, Budgie, Cinnamon, or XFCE. I've done it on Fedora, Manjaro, Ubuntu, Mint, Elementary, and even FreeBSD (Unix, not Linux, I know).

So I have to ask when the last time you tried to perform this action? I've been doing it for years without a problem.
 
2022-08-15 10:22:12 PM  

spacechecker: THIS is obviously the year of the Linux desktop.


I mainly use RedHat-derived distros and do everything from a shell session. I haven't wanted a GUI for much of anything on Linux in probably a decade.

I installed Ubuntu 22 on an Acer notebook with a 12th gen i7 because I'd had to swap the SSD and it turns out that even Windows 11 needs supplemental drivers to access disks or use USB devices on that hardware and I didn't feel like screwing around with the Windows AIK. Everything on Ubuntu worked out of the box. Power management, 802.11 and Bluetooth; it found all of the network printers right away and even the process scheduler didn't have any issues with the low power cores vs the performance cores, which is a problem for Windows 10 on the same hardware. I was honestly pretty impressed with how well integrated it was. The default repos didn't have Vivaldi, but Firefox was right there and entirely functional. Google Docs and the Web version of MS Office worked perfectly. I had to do a tiny bit of fiddling to get Google Drive mounted that probably would've seemed scary to some people, but beyond that it was absolutely fine for day to day computing.

ChromeOS is probably still ultimately the best "easy" setup, but if I'm going down the checklist, I saw PC that needed next to no help to make printing or scanning work (this is a pain point for ChromeOS) and already had a full set of nice-to-have software already on the machine the first time it started.

I have Windows-only content creation software (DxO, Topaz Labs, Capture One et al) that make it my go-to for my big PCs, but the stupid-easy setup on Ubuntu really does make me think I'd be fine for most purposes. There really isn't much going on to say that it couldn't be the year for Linux. Especially if MS keeps shiatting the bed on locking people out of their own PCs.
 
2022-08-15 11:34:05 PM  

Mikey1969: If people would start farking making their apps work on Linux. Also, I have had the biggest pain in the ass on Linux with networked drives.


What applications are you using?  Be specific; give their exact names and what they do.  Everything I've needed since 1999 except commercial games has had an RPM, a DEB, or an ebuild, and installation has almost always been easy.  Of course, I'm not doing weird custom audio editing, or commercial artwork using CMYK and twelve custom Photoslop filters.  Image editing, text editing, web browsing, bookkeeping, emulating GBA/NES/SNES/PS1, developing node.js and python things for my orkplace, and running a VPS with apache and MariaDB are what I need.  And these things run for me just fine on a Frankenstein x86 with some 24-year-old components.

Also putting a CIFS network share into /etc/fstab is pretty well documented, or should be.  I told people how to do that on comp.os.linux.* roughly once a week in the 2000s.  The /etc/fstab line looks kind of like so:

//server/share  /mnt/somewhere  cifs  auto,username=USER,password=PASS,domain=DOM  0  0

...however, you have to make sure that //server/share will be available when the machine boots, otherwise it'll be like "derp, machine unreachable" and wait 30ish seconds for it to time out.  /mnt/somewhere has to exist and be a directory.  The server named server has to be resolvable via DNS.  Change auto to noauto, add "users" to the options if it might not be there, and chown the dir to your non-root user if you want to mount the darn thing manually.  If you're using KDE, you can use the smb:// KIOslave as well.

Also, find the nearest LUG and join their mailing list.  Many LUG members are pretty good at providing tech support to n00bs.
 
2022-08-16 6:31:50 AM  

Flowery Twats: Happily running Mint 20.3


Same here.  I have Mint running on three desktops, and I just blew out Win 10 and installed Mint on the new laptop my daughter is going to be using for her junior year in high school next week.

If there's a reason I absolutely need to use Windows (and I do for work), I have a standalone Win 10 machine that's not connected to the network, plus Win 7 installed as a VirtualBox VM in one of the Mint desktops.
 
2022-08-16 12:08:31 PM  

danceswithcrows: Mikey1969: If people would start farking making their apps work on Linux. Also, I have had the biggest pain in the ass on Linux with networked drives.

What applications are you using?  Be specific; give their exact names and what they do.  Everything I've needed since 1999 except commercial games has had an RPM, a DEB, or an ebuild, and installation has almost always been easy.  Of course, I'm not doing weird custom audio editing, or commercial artwork using CMYK and twelve custom Photoslop filters.  Image editing, text editing, web browsing, bookkeeping, emulating GBA/NES/SNES/PS1, developing node.js and python things for my orkplace, and running a VPS with apache and MariaDB are what I need.  And these things run for me just fine on a Frankenstein x86 with some 24-year-old components.

Also putting a CIFS network share into /etc/fstab is pretty well documented, or should be.  I told people how to do that on comp.os.linux.* roughly once a week in the 2000s.  The /etc/fstab line looks kind of like so:

//server/share  /mnt/somewhere  cifs  auto,username=USER,password=PASS,domain=DOM  0  0

...however, you have to make sure that //server/share will be available when the machine boots, otherwise it'll be like "derp, machine unreachable" and wait 30ish seconds for it to time out.  /mnt/somewhere has to exist and be a directory.  The server named server has to be resolvable via DNS.  Change auto to noauto, add "users" to the options if it might not be there, and chown the dir to your non-root user if you want to mount the darn thing manually.  If you're using KDE, you can use the smb:// KIOslave as well.

Also, find the nearest LUG and join their mailing list.  Many LUG members are pretty good at providing tech support to n00bs.


All of the above is the exact definition of "pain in the ass"
 
2022-08-16 1:00:04 PM  

trialpha: All of the above is the exact definition of "pain in the ass"


If adding 1 line to /etc/fstab in order to mount a CIFS share is a PITA to you, your bar for pain is ridiculously low.  You want pain?  Try installing Oracle; you will suffer.  CIFS and SMB before it have mostly been solved on the client side since 1999.  The alternative I mentioned, putting "smb://machinename/" into the KDE file manager, only works with KDE, but that may be enough for many people and it doesn't require editing fstab.
 
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