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(Yahoo)   Oder River stinks   (news.yahoo.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Baltic Sea, Steffi Lemke, Poland, Oder River, mass die-off of fish, German authorities, news conference, Germany  
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2296 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Aug 2022 at 5:30 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



15 Comments     (+0 »)
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2022-08-15 5:32:36 AM  
3.bp.blogspot.comView Full Size
 
2022-08-15 5:33:38 AM  
Was genau oder river stinks?
 
2022-08-15 5:36:07 AM  
No wonder it stinks, they're beefing mega sized turd into it.
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-08-15 5:37:26 AM  
rollingstone.comView Full Size


RIP ODERUS URUNGUS
 
2022-08-15 5:46:52 AM  
The river Oder, one of the largest rivers going into the Baltic sea, originating in Czechia, going through Poland and Germany, was found to be highly toxic with at least Mercury levels off the measurable charts with the test used in Germany. The contamination seems to have originated in Poland where reports about potential contamination of the water dates back roughly two weeks ago. An official warning to Germany and also the Polish public only happened two days ago.
At least 10 tons of fish is already pulled out of the water, it has to be determined if they have to be disposed as highly contaminated. It is feared that the river is dead by now, not only the fish have died, but also microorganisms that live in the River. The Oder also flows along a German national park, of where it is feared that the water will cause damage to the nature and wild life.

MisterMysterios
 
2022-08-15 5:58:11 AM  
This article https://news.yahoo.com/high-salinity-found-european-river-103854093.html says no mercury was found, just elevated salt levels.
 
2022-08-15 6:06:28 AM  
I'm guessing heat. Heat kills fish that aren't adapted to it. Salmon in particular are extremely sensitive to heat. Europe is in the middle of a bunch of terrible heatwaves, right? If the rivers are low enough that the water heats up, even in just one portion, the fish there are just gonna die. In particular, if dams aren't allowing enough flow of water it's easy for it to get too hot downstream.
 
2022-08-15 6:11:15 AM  

adamatari: I'm guessing heat. Heat kills fish that aren't adapted to it. Salmon in particular are extremely sensitive to heat. Europe is in the middle of a bunch of terrible heatwaves, right? If the rivers are low enough that the water heats up, even in just one portion, the fish there are just gonna die. In particular, if dams aren't allowing enough flow of water it's easy for it to get too hot downstream.


No it was the massive amounts of mercury dumped into it. It's a dead river to the point that single cell organisms are dead.
 
2022-08-15 6:12:10 AM  
Putin
 
2022-08-15 6:12:47 AM  
The River Thames in UK was declared "dead" in 1957.

Then, this happened.

https://thelogicalindian.com/environment/river-thames/
 
2022-08-15 7:23:59 AM  

thatboyoverthere: adamatari: I'm guessing heat. Heat kills fish that aren't adapted to it. Salmon in particular are extremely sensitive to heat. Europe is in the middle of a bunch of terrible heatwaves, right? If the rivers are low enough that the water heats up, even in just one portion, the fish there are just gonna die. In particular, if dams aren't allowing enough flow of water it's easy for it to get too hot downstream.

No it was the massive amounts of mercury dumped into it. It's a dead river to the point that single cell organisms are dead.


IF it was mercury...Then why was there no mercury in the fish?  (per article)
I think i'd take an AP article over random Reddit person...
 
2022-08-15 7:49:21 AM  

Mr. Shabooboo: thatboyoverthere: adamatari: I'm guessing heat. Heat kills fish that aren't adapted to it. Salmon in particular are extremely sensitive to heat. Europe is in the middle of a bunch of terrible heatwaves, right? If the rivers are low enough that the water heats up, even in just one portion, the fish there are just gonna die. In particular, if dams aren't allowing enough flow of water it's easy for it to get too hot downstream.

No it was the massive amounts of mercury dumped into it. It's a dead river to the point that single cell organisms are dead.

IF it was mercury...Then why was there no mercury in the fish?  (per article)
I think i'd take an AP article over random Reddit person...


Salt is interesting.  Poland has massive salt mining industries.  I am wondering if there was a mine collapse, and a bunch of salt from a mine, possibly an inactive one, or even a medieval mine that no one remembers is there, and a bunch of salt is escaping into the river as a result.

Also, if a salty river can kill a bunch of fish in that river, than how did all the freshwater fish survive Noah's flood when the Oceans and fresh water got all mixed together?  Are you saying that didn't happen?
 
2022-08-15 8:06:03 AM  

winedrinkingman: Mr. Shabooboo: thatboyoverthere: adamatari: I'm guessing heat. Heat kills fish that aren't adapted to it. Salmon in particular are extremely sensitive to heat. Europe is in the middle of a bunch of terrible heatwaves, right? If the rivers are low enough that the water heats up, even in just one portion, the fish there are just gonna die. In particular, if dams aren't allowing enough flow of water it's easy for it to get too hot downstream.

No it was the massive amounts of mercury dumped into it. It's a dead river to the point that single cell organisms are dead.

IF it was mercury...Then why was there no mercury in the fish?  (per article)
I think i'd take an AP article over random Reddit person...

Salt is interesting.  Poland has massive salt mining industries.  I am wondering if there was a mine collapse, and a bunch of salt from a mine, possibly an inactive one, or even a medieval mine that no one remembers is there, and a bunch of salt is escaping into the river as a result.

Also, if a salty river can kill a bunch of fish in that river, than how did all the freshwater fish survive Noah's flood when the Oceans and fresh water got all mixed together?  Are you saying that didn't happen?


If the river was already a bit on the salty side..Maybe the backflow from the Baltic plus low flow/water levels
allowed the salt to travel further upstream (higher density seeking lower density)... Any riverine scienticians?
 
2022-08-15 11:06:46 AM  
Das riecht, oder?
 
2022-08-15 11:18:54 AM  

Mr. Shabooboo: winedrinkingman: Mr. Shabooboo: thatboyoverthere: adamatari: I'm guessing heat. Heat kills fish that aren't adapted to it. Salmon in particular are extremely sensitive to heat. Europe is in the middle of a bunch of terrible heatwaves, right? If the rivers are low enough that the water heats up, even in just one portion, the fish there are just gonna die. In particular, if dams aren't allowing enough flow of water it's easy for it to get too hot downstream.

No it was the massive amounts of mercury dumped into it. It's a dead river to the point that single cell organisms are dead.

IF it was mercury...Then why was there no mercury in the fish?  (per article)
I think i'd take an AP article over random Reddit person...

Salt is interesting.  Poland has massive salt mining industries.  I am wondering if there was a mine collapse, and a bunch of salt from a mine, possibly an inactive one, or even a medieval mine that no one remembers is there, and a bunch of salt is escaping into the river as a result.

Also, if a salty river can kill a bunch of fish in that river, than how did all the freshwater fish survive Noah's flood when the Oceans and fresh water got all mixed together?  Are you saying that didn't happen?

If the river was already a bit on the salty side..Maybe the backflow from the Baltic plus low flow/water levels
allowed the salt to travel further upstream (higher density seeking lower density)... Any riverine scienticians?


There is no tides to speak of in Baltic so there would be no backflow of the sea water . Also, if any salt mine would "collapse" then it would not spray the salty water upwards, salt mines are much deeper than the river level.
On the other hand... the tributary of upper Oder is in the Silesia region which is the centre of Polish heavy industry and mining. All this was a source of heavy metal pollutants for years. Also, the water pumped from the coal mines had very high salt content, so it may be related to that too.
 
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