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(Slash Gear)   Magnets could help with oxygen problems for astronauts on long voyages, and the data could sound attractive to us   (slashgear.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Oxygen, International Space Station, Space exploration, low gravity of space, latest research, bubbles of gas, novel method, NASA  
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619 clicks; posted to STEM » on 14 Aug 2022 at 12:26 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



20 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-08-14 9:19:48 AM  
So my fridge, which is completely covered in magnets, will help here?
 
2022-08-14 11:06:24 AM  
Magnets?  How the fark do they work?
 
2022-08-14 12:41:46 PM  
I love how at no point in the article does the writer explain that oxygen is actually paramagnetic and attracted to magnetic fields. You know, maybe giving readers the slightest clue as to why it might work.
 
2022-08-14 12:46:00 PM  

BigMax: Magnets?  How the fark do they work?


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-08-14 12:49:38 PM  
i.kym-cdn.comView Full Size

"Oxygen!"
 
2022-08-14 1:15:08 PM  
How would that work?
 
2022-08-14 1:24:20 PM  

CakeandBeer: I love how at no point in the article does the writer explain that oxygen is actually paramagnetic and attracted to magnetic fields. You know, maybe giving readers the slightest clue as to why it might work.


The article may not explain it well, but that's pretty much the entire premise.

Normally in a zero-G environment the gas bubbles will just separate evenly out in all directions. It won't bubble to the top as it does with gravity, so they have to use a centrifuge to get it out, but centrifuges are huge and annoying for a variety of reasons.

Magnets probably work more slowly but are much smaller, more compact and use no energy. Basically you stick a magnet on there and it pulls the oxygen all into one nice, convenient bubble so that it can be efficiently harvested.


lilbjorn: How would that work?


See above.
 
2022-08-14 1:41:44 PM  
how the hell do they work?
th.bing.comView Full Size
 
2022-08-14 2:12:35 PM  
Today I remembered that oxygen is paramagnetic.

Liquid oxygen caught in a magnet
Youtube Ee5qN74y2Xg
 
2022-08-14 3:43:36 PM  
Yay we can cut down the trees and put up magnets
 
2022-08-14 4:00:22 PM  

khatores: Normally in a zero-G environment the gas bubbles will just separate evenly out in all directions. It won't bubble to the top as it does with gravity, so they have to use a centrifuge to get it out, but centrifuges are huge and annoying for a variety of reasons.


People don't do well in zero-G for long term, either.  If it's that long of a trip, spin the ship and keep the people/liquid off-axis.  Water is a fantastic radiation shield, so it should be in the outer hull lining anyway.
 
2022-08-14 5:54:11 PM  

LoneVVolf: khatores: Normally in a zero-G environment the gas bubbles will just separate evenly out in all directions. It won't bubble to the top as it does with gravity, so they have to use a centrifuge to get it out, but centrifuges are huge and annoying for a variety of reasons.

People don't do well in zero-G for long term, either.  If it's that long of a trip, spin the ship and keep the people/liquid off-axis.  Water is a fantastic radiation shield, so it should be in the outer hull lining anyway.


If we want to be a space-faring species, variable gravity is something we're going to have to learn to deal with as well as possible. We could also be on the surface of the Moon and have a similar problem, or have people doing an EVA.

It's going to be a while before we have the capability to build a ship that can do that. There's a minimum size requirement to avoid a significant tidal force differential between the head and feet. That would probably require orbital assembly, even if it were a Bigelow blow-up ship.

A lot of people want to get to Mars before that and people will volunteer for the mission even knowing the risks and the likelihood of never returning. That way we can kick off development on Mars by the time we have real ships built.
 
2022-08-14 6:29:09 PM  
Is there really a North and South in space?
 
2022-08-14 8:02:56 PM  

Bob Down: Is there really a North and South in space?


Sure, but dependent on your position relative to local objects and their motion. In the solar system, 'north' is relative to the direction of spin of the plane of ecliptic. If the plane of ecliptic is moving from left to right from your vantage point, then your head will be pointing 'north'. Planets and other rotating bodies the same- if the object is rotating left to right from your frame of reference, then your head is pointing 'north' relative to that object.

All objects with magnetic fields have an internal north and south- but these are completely arbitrary, independent of your position.
 
2022-08-14 8:13:20 PM  

khatores: It's going to be a while before we have the capability to build a ship that can do that. There's a minimum size requirement to avoid a significant tidal force differential between the head and feet. That would probably require orbital assembly, even if it were a Bigelow blow-up ship.


You don't need a continuous volume. Put the crew capsule on one end of a long beam or tether, with a counterweight on the other end. The size of each compartment is independent of the distance between them.

If you're using nuclear power, put the reactor in the counterweight section to put some extra distance between it and the astronauts.
 
2022-08-14 8:32:34 PM  
Prepare a container.
Add water.

Fark user imageView Full Size


Enjoy!
 
2022-08-14 10:23:07 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


One day Magnus will be a Farker.
 
2022-08-15 2:01:02 AM  
Thanks for overthinking that
 
2022-08-15 3:43:37 AM  

Ivo Shandor: khatores: It's going to be a while before we have the capability to build a ship that can do that. There's a minimum size requirement to avoid a significant tidal force differential between the head and feet. That would probably require orbital assembly, even if it were a Bigelow blow-up ship.

You don't need a continuous volume. Put the crew capsule on one end of a long beam or tether, with a counterweight on the other end. The size of each compartment is independent of the distance between them.

If you're using nuclear power, put the reactor in the counterweight section to put some extra distance between it and the astronauts.


Yeah, that's true...I guess a giant wheel isn't strictly necessary. We would still encounter varying levels of gravity if we want to have people actually exploring other planets and moons though. We could build underground bases with artificial gravity there (albeit sideways, probably) but doing anything outside would still be bouncy.
 
2022-08-15 6:07:39 AM  

Bob Down: Thanks for overthinking that


You posted a basic science-related question on a thread in the STEM tab. What did you expect? There are actual astrophysicists who read and comment here. Be happy you only got a short paragraph with no acronyms in common English, because a dissertation-level response from multiple commenters is definitely a possibility here.

You're welcome.
 
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