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(Big Think)   Smartphones might actually be improving your memory. The phenomenon of "digital dementia" might not be real after all   (bigthink.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Computer, Electronics, Memory, Better, Psychology, Cognition, Digital, newstudy  
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1158 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Aug 2022 at 5:35 PM (16 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



36 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-08-13 5:44:33 PM  
Recently my smartphone keyboard was stwithc to a "write your words" field.

Took me too long to figure out how to switch it back

Why The fark would someone want to WRITE their messages instead of typing?
 
2022-08-13 5:44:33 PM  
"If you want to remember something, you likely save it in an electronic device. We didn't have that luxury just a couple decades ago, meaning we needed to memorize a lot more information."

Or, and just hear me out, we wrote down the shiat we needed to remember, or had some other way to reference important info. Jeebus, people act like it was so difficult to live without electronics back then. I really want to see the new movie "Bodies Bodies Bodies", because it's supposed to be a commentary on how young adults now interact with social media, smartphones, and 'living in the moment'.
 
2022-08-13 5:45:29 PM  
Eggheads trying to justify their overblown salaries.

How about a $500,000 grant to study the REAL REASON  why flies are attracted to dog crap?
 
2022-08-13 5:48:59 PM  
Digital dementia might not be a thing? But now how can I rant about the kids these days and their Whatsapps?
 
2022-08-13 5:49:51 PM  
That's why elephants confiscate smartphones

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-08-13 5:52:23 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size

/ I was the next man
 
2022-08-13 5:58:29 PM  
My smartphone was very good at helping me remember emergency alerts in the middle of the night about something that happened 300 miles away. I asked the guy from the phone company, "What am I supposed to do, go out and look?" He told me I couldn't turn it off, which I had already suspected, since the menu item was greyed out. I got a landline. I haven't had a memory problem since then.

/or before then, that I can remember
 
2022-08-13 5:58:48 PM  
I remember the important things and use my computers to store all of the trivia, like that actor's name, you know the one, she was in that movie, no when she was a blond and did that thing with what's-his-face.
 
2022-08-13 6:04:21 PM  
When I was young, I knew a dozen or more phone numbers. Right now, I couldn't tell you my wife's number.
 
2022-08-13 6:04:45 PM  
Well, if it's on the Internet, it must be true
 
2022-08-13 6:07:37 PM  
Well, sure.
It's all the word games.
Neuroscientists are BEGGING us to play them.
 
2022-08-13 6:09:58 PM  
I can understand how it can be improving people's memory. We now have to memorize things like were to look for sources, how to 'vet' reliable source
 
2022-08-13 6:10:16 PM  

X-Geek: When I was young, I knew a dozen or more phone numbers. Right now, I couldn't tell you my wife's number.


I could never remember phone numbers. I wrote them on the cover of the telephone book...
 
2022-08-13 6:23:35 PM  

X-Geek: When I was young, I knew a dozen or more phone numbers. Right now, I couldn't tell you my wife's number.


Don't worry, I've got your wife's number right here.
/wat
 
2022-08-13 6:24:46 PM  
I knew all those "your IQ is this" programs were paying on.
 
2022-08-13 6:26:27 PM  
Yur an idjut.
 
2022-08-13 6:33:11 PM  
People who claim smartphones cause "digital dementia" are crusty old farts who hate all new technology and think the good old days were better.

However, nobody should kid themselves into thinking we can commit things to memory just as easily as people could a century ago (certainly) or even 50 years ago.  People worked on and developed retention skills out of necessity and necessarily got better at it.  Brain skills are like other skills, as you develop and use those skills, you get better at it.  But calling a lesser developed ability to memorize "dementia" is like if you called someone who doesn't work out "paralysed".
 
2022-08-13 6:40:00 PM  
On this website ..nothing but stupid Trumper-wannbes all the way down.
 
2022-08-13 6:55:46 PM  

skinink: FTA: "If you want to remember something, you likely save it in an electronic device. We didn't have that luxury just a couple decades ago, meaning we needed to memorize a lot more information."


?  My parents got an Apple //c in 1985, I inherited an SE/30 in 1994, and I bought my first x86 in 1998.  We were early adopters, but storing data on magnetic media has been a thing for longer than I've been alive and practical for home users since the mid-1980s.

With cellphones being able to store phone numbers, I no longer memorize them and haven't needed to since 1999.[0]  Losing all the data on ~ would be super-annoying, though, which is why I have it on softRAID-1 and backed up to external USB disks every day.  (How would Joe User deal with that?  I am assuming Joe User wouldn't know a RAID if it bit him and is allergic to using the command line.)

optikeye: We now have to memorize things like [where] to look for sources, how to 'vet' reliable source


When it comes to sources on the internet, most browsers have this thing called "bookmarks" that's ridiculously useful when trying to recall where stuff was.  Here, you cognitively offload "where was page N" to a .sqlite file under ~/.mozilla/firefox/f00f.default/ , or potentially someone else's computer.  Source reliability is more difficult.

If you actually need to memorize information, the "memory house" technique is often helpful.  Imagine a place that you know well, like your house.  Imagine yourself placing information into a specific place in your house.  Alice's phone# is 555-555-1234, that goes in the silverware drawer with the spoons.  The safe deposit box# is 10312, that goes in the cabinet next to the canned tomatoes, etcetera.

[0] Cognitive offloading.  You don't need to memorize Homer's Odyssey, it's all in the book on the shelf.  You don't need to remember financial transactions, you write them down in a checkbook or finance program.  Theoretically this makes us more efficient, realistically we use any saved time to watch cat videos.
 
2022-08-13 7:00:54 PM  

danceswithcrows: ?  My parents got an Apple //c in 1985, I inherited an SE/30 in 1994, and I bought my first x86 in 1998.


Oooohh. Someone's parents loved him. WoooOOOoo.
 
2022-08-13 7:03:45 PM  

optikeye: I can understand how it can be improving people's memory. We now have to memorize things like were to look for sources, how to 'vet' reliable source


Came here to say exactly that. I salute you.
Vintage memes can be good when carefully decanted.
Fark user imageView Full Size
Not a comment on Gore at all,
 
2022-08-13 7:06:24 PM  
Hey, ya'll hear anything about these new digital dentures?
 
2022-08-13 7:07:51 PM  
Hey, just because people aren't remembering things that previous generations thought were important (telephone numbers, addresses, etc) doesn't mean they aren't remembering things.

It's like the old "calculators are making kids worse at maths" scare.
 
2022-08-13 7:21:35 PM  
I dunno, subby.  I could feel myself getting stupider just reading that article.
 
2022-08-13 7:29:10 PM  
Peter Gabriel - I Don't Remember - (album version) Home Video
Youtube wlKyWKODn_4
 
2022-08-13 7:31:32 PM  

Social Justice Warlock: X-Geek: When I was young, I knew a dozen or more phone numbers. Right now, I couldn't tell you my wife's number.

Don't worry, I've got your wife's number right here.
/wat


You too?

/no disrespected intended.  getting old sucks.
 
2022-08-13 7:37:02 PM  

cwheelie: Hey, ya'll hear anything about these new digital dentures?


What for?  In a couple years, we'll get all our sustenance from pills - take a few for breakfast, some for lunch, and another couple for dinner.  We'll all be slim 'n' trim in our uniform, unisex silver spacesuits.
 
2022-08-13 7:41:45 PM  

danceswithcrows: When it comes to sources on the internet, most browsers have this thing called "bookmarks"

Wow!
Thanks for telling me that condescending asshole.
 
2022-08-13 8:01:02 PM  
I warned you! I warned you when we started writing stuff down on clay tablets that if we develop writing then nobody will every bother remembering things and we'll turn into a society of idiots who are useless without their clay tablets to remember things for them. Okay so it took a little longer than I thought it would but still I WARNED YOU!!!!

Also, fark you Ea-Nasir. Your copper sucks!
 
2022-08-13 8:07:39 PM  
FRONTLINE ASSEMBLY - DIGITAL TENSION DEMENTIA
Youtube cHmWKkjYRps
/1998.  Bleeb was a prophet
 
2022-08-13 8:08:03 PM  

Flab: [YouTube video: FRONTLINE ASSEMBLY - DIGITAL TENSION DEMENTIA]/1998.  Bleeb was a prophet


1988.  Not 1998.
 
2022-08-13 8:48:25 PM  

PR Deltoid: Eggheads trying to justify their overblown salaries.

How about a $500,000 grant to study the REAL REASON  why flies are attracted to dog crap?


Predictable as Old Faithful. You fear and loathe anyone smarter than you, which is an awful lot of people to hate. All you can do is sneer and drool and fondle your tiny little gun. God forbid you might actually learn something
 
2022-08-13 8:48:40 PM  
Yes, and fat is healthy.
 
2022-08-13 9:12:41 PM  
Having a smartphone at my fingertips every waking moment has taught me that longitudinal studies, perhaps more than any other type of studies, reflect the biases of their curators.  One would think that with such a large sample size, biases would be eliminated.  And for properly conducted longitudinal studies, that is the likely case.  But in practice, having such a large cake too often--perhaps even unconsciously in some cases--provides the server with an ample canvas from which to carve slices of unusual size and shape.
 
2022-08-13 9:17:35 PM  

ansius: It's like the old "calculators are making kids worse at maths" scare.


My HS chemistry teacher, in 1978, astutely commented on how calculators made students lazy (not stupid). They frequently didn't immediately recognize that they'd received an answer from their devices that was wrong by an order of magnitude (i.e., a factor of 10) that they should've known based simply on the magnitude of their inputs. She drilled into us how to know the ballpark of the answer to expect from our chemistry formulas, as well as how to properly arrange numerators and denominators so that the correct units were in our final result, another way of validating our calculations.
 
2022-08-13 9:54:04 PM  
My (old) dad made some comment about how I shouldn't let students use their smartphones as translators in a language acquisition class in reading comprehension.

"That's why nobody can do math in their head anymore. They just use their phones."

My response: "Good doing math in your head sucks. You're never sure what the right answer is."

My job is to make sure students know how to read certain words. How they learn them is immaterial. You have a pretty reliable translator in your pocket you say? Sounds pretty convenient. I would use that then.
 
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