Skip to content
Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Popular Science)   Nothing to see here, move along   (popsci.com) divider line
    More: Scary, Ocean, Feedback, Arctic Ocean, sea ice, Global warming, Climate, positive feedback loop, Arctic warming  
•       •       •

3645 clicks; posted to STEM » and Politics » on 13 Aug 2022 at 11:38 AM (15 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



27 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-08-13 9:55:12 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-08-13 10:31:07 AM  
How long can you tread water?
 
2022-08-13 11:51:53 AM  
Remember......it's all your fault for not carpooling to work and throwing away that plastic water bottle in 1993.
Our altruistic corporate overlords have no blame in this.
 
2022-08-13 12:06:18 PM  
Well, we had a good run, and during our time on the planet, we created a lot of wealth for those sit-at-home stockholders.
 
2022-08-13 12:13:53 PM  
y.yarn.coView Full Size
 
2022-08-13 12:25:26 PM  
Yet a few people laughed at me recently when I said all the huge icebergs melting wasn't normal, and they said "It's what icebergs do." In the Stem tab, no less.
 
2022-08-13 12:54:57 PM  
So nobody lives there anyway it's too crowded
 
2022-08-13 1:22:49 PM  
In January, there was a paper released saying that the ice shelf holding back the "Doomsday Glacier" in Antarctica might be just a few years away from giving way rather than a hundred.  That the measured rate of reduction, calving, and fissure-forming is consistent with this.

So there's a better chance of sea level jumping up a meter or so in the next decade than of 'giant meteor' paying a visit in the next few million years.
 
2022-08-13 1:24:06 PM  

lindalouwho: Yet a few people laughed at me recently when I said all the huge icebergs melting wasn't normal, and they said "It's what icebergs do." In the Stem tab, no less.


Their existence means we are in an ice age
 
2022-08-13 1:30:31 PM  

lindalouwho: Yet a few people laughed at me recently when I said all the huge icebergs melting wasn't normal, and they said "It's what icebergs do." In the Stem tab, no less.


They're correct, more or less.  Icebergs have broken away from the place of their formation and generally speaking the water they're floating in is above freezing... so it melts them.

The problem from our perspective isn't that icebergs are melting, it's that the glaciers they're coming from aren't forming as quickly as they're calving more icebergs.
 
2022-08-13 1:58:27 PM  
So, how did they manage to ignore the methane seeping out of arctic sinkholes? That probably has quite a bit to do with localized heating being so much higher than the rest of the planet
 
2022-08-13 2:22:06 PM  
Just more fear mongering. The planet will be fine. People, on the other hand, well, maybe not so much.

On the upside, it turns out I may get to go to the after party for Human Civilization. And I feel better about not spending extra for the roof shingles with a 50 year guarantee, so I have that going for me, which is nice.
 
2022-08-13 2:29:23 PM  

p89tech: it turns out I may get to go to the after party for Human Civilization


I'm on the fence about it all.  Old enough not to really personally worry that there may not be a great future in store for humanity, young enough to not want to deal with that future personally.

I also live in what will likely be one of the places least impacted by global climate change; in fact, short of a direct visit from Giant Meteor, there are very few global disaster scenarios that would affect me beyond what you'd expect from the rest of the world ceasing to trade.  Even migration / water wars aren't a huge concern, since I'd expect the Great Lake states to act in their own self interest and effectively act as a buffer against other Americans heading this way.  This too is a mixed bag, since things could be bad enough to make me miserable but not bad enough to outright kill me and get it over with.

So whatever happens, odds are if it happens in my lifetime I'll survive it and spend my remaining years in the aftermath.
 
2022-08-13 2:47:10 PM  

Unsung_Hero: lindalouwho: Yet a few people laughed at me recently when I said all the huge icebergs melting wasn't normal, and they said "It's what icebergs do." In the Stem tab, no less.

They're correct, more or less.  Icebergs have broken away from the place of their formation and generally speaking the water they're floating in is above freezing... so it melts them.

The problem from our perspective isn't that icebergs are melting, it's that the glaciers they're coming from aren't forming as quickly as they're calving more icebergs.


Ok, technically correct *sigh* the best kind of correct.
 
2022-08-13 3:35:08 PM  
In 2020, 90+ Democrats ran supporting the Green New Deal. All but one won.

https://www.commondreams.org/news/2020/11/09/99-green-new-deal-co-sponsors-won-their-races-cycle-analysis

Whenever politicians or pundits say that progressive policies are "impractical" or "unpopular", that typically translates to "The voters want them, but the big donors don't".
 
2022-08-13 3:41:51 PM  

Bith Set Me Up: In 2020, 90+ Democrats ran supporting the Green New Deal. All but one won.

https://www.commondreams.org/news/2020/11/09/99-green-new-deal-co-sponsors-won-their-races-cycle-analysis

Whenever politicians or pundits say that progressive policies are "impractical" or "unpopular", that typically translates to "The voters want them, but the big donors don't".


Yet, the last I heard of it was it was still only 2-pages written by AOC.
 
2022-08-13 4:08:32 PM  

Unsung_Hero: In January, there was a paper released saying that the ice shelf holding back the "Doomsday Glacier" in Antarctica might be just a few years away from giving way rather than a hundred.  That the measured rate of reduction, calving, and fissure-forming is consistent with this.

So there's a better chance of sea level jumping up a meter or so in the next decade than of 'giant meteor' paying a visit in the next few million years.


Unless the less-than-permafrost releases a mess of new pathogens we can't deal with first.
 
2022-08-13 4:15:07 PM  

lindalouwho: Yet a few people laughed at me recently when I said all the huge icebergs melting wasn't normal, and they said "It's what icebergs do." In the Stem tab, no less.


This is revenge for the Titanic.
 
2022-08-13 4:21:09 PM  

dionysusaur: Unless the less-than-permafrost releases a mess of new pathogens we can't deal with first.


Which is another interesting bit about evolution... overall it does seem to be an arms race with ever increasing complexity between competitors or in predator/prey relationships.  But on other scales 'progress' is different, and an arms race can end up running in a big circle.

Unlike a human arms race where sticks and stones become forever pointless when you have nuclear-tipped ICBMs, in biology there's no point in maintaining an offensive strategy after an effective defense emerges, and no point in maintaining an effective defense once an offensive strategy fades away.  They can cycle endlessly through a handful of paths repeating over generations and there is no intelligence keeping the a journal so past defenses can be quickly brought back out of mothball.

We may have thousands or even tens or hundreds of thousands of years of evolution between us and what's coming out of melting permafrost, but because of evolution we've far more likely lost a lot of immune defenses against those things than gained them.  Those old offensive strategies not only don't have to worry about us having defenses, it's possible that we've lost even semi-effective defenses that those viruses and bacteria etc. evolved to overcome, because we haven't needed them so random chance had them fall apart while there was no evolutionary pressure to conserve them.

TL;DR: Possible DOOM DOOM DOOM.  But maybe not.  We shall see.
 
2022-08-13 4:51:35 PM  
'Nice puddle ya got there.'
'It used to be my igloo. Thanks a steaming pile, first-world consumer assholes!'
 
2022-08-13 4:57:27 PM  
I feel sorry for the less advantaged countries and island nations. That being said, perhaps if the planet fights back people will pay attention?
Also: the hours upon hours of rubbing nay-sayers faces in it will be nice
 
2022-08-13 6:08:09 PM  
This is just a thought I had, what kind of bacteria and other assorted stuff is going to thaw out. Not to mention big that saucer shaped thing that's also thawing.
 
2022-08-13 7:44:07 PM  
Wait.  The industrial revolution started like 150 years ago.  We've only managed to raise temps 1 degree Celsius since then?
 
2022-08-13 8:00:45 PM  

Unsung_Hero: dionysusaur: Unless the less-than-permafrost releases a mess of new pathogens we can't deal with first.

Which is another interesting bit about evolution... overall it does seem to be an arms race with ever increasing complexity between competitors or in predator/prey relationships.  But on other scales 'progress' is different, and an arms race can end up running in a big circle.

Unlike a human arms race where sticks and stones become forever pointless when you have nuclear-tipped ICBMs, in biology there's no point in maintaining an offensive strategy after an effective defense emerges, and no point in maintaining an effective defense once an offensive strategy fades away.  They can cycle endlessly through a handful of paths repeating over generations and there is no intelligence keeping the a journal so past defenses can be quickly brought back out of mothball.

We may have thousands or even tens or hundreds of thousands of years of evolution between us and what's coming out of melting permafrost, but because of evolution we've far more likely lost a lot of immune defenses against those things than gained them.  Those old offensive strategies not only don't have to worry about us having defenses, it's possible that we've lost even semi-effective defenses that those viruses and bacteria etc. evolved to overcome, because we haven't needed them so random chance had them fall apart while there was no evolutionary pressure to conserve them.

TL;DR: Possible DOOM DOOM DOOM.  But maybe not.  We shall see.


I think I saw this in a movie or several once...
 
2022-08-13 9:09:39 PM  
back to global warming stories means the pandemic is over
 
2022-08-14 12:11:05 AM  
The interesting thing about nature is that if it is not completely dead, it can come back.  And unlike us, it restores when it lives, not degrades.
There's some kind of lesson in there, but it's just beyond me.  Just beyond that big carbon capture plant they're building......
 
2022-08-14 12:57:26 AM  

cryinoutloud: And unlike us, it restores when it lives, not degrades.


Speak for yourself, I'm gonna live forever!

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
Displayed 27 of 27 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.