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(AutoEvolution)   Australia, the continent where everything is trying to kill you. Even Google maps   (autoevolution.com) divider line
    More: Scary  
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3260 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Aug 2022 at 7:30 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-08-12 7:34:48 PM  
Article doesn't say what type of car they drove. I'm guessing a Subaru Outback.
 
2022-08-12 7:38:13 PM  

cyberspacedout: Article doesn't say what type of car they drove. I'm guessing a Subaru Outback.


There is a LOT of Australia where driving "roads" required a top-of-the-range 4WD. I once went on a camping trip with a friend around the very northernmost bits of South Australia in a Toyota Landcruiser and the only other vehicles we saw for days were Toyota Landcruisers. Not only would a Subaru Outback let you down, nobody would risk it in a Mitsubishi Pajero or a Range Rover.
 
2022-08-12 7:40:27 PM  
preview.redd.itView Full Size
 
2022-08-12 7:43:52 PM  
Mapquest tried to lead me the wrong way around Donner Lake one time

/That was years ago, and I still don't trust apps
 
2022-08-12 7:45:51 PM  
Queenslanders
 
2022-08-12 7:48:30 PM  
Google maps has no idea...whether a road is appropriate or not.

Mmhm. Probably a better idea than a person asking Google maps for help. Know what they would call a human that would offer directions without knowing whether they were safe?

the driver had better stick with the safer route, despite the increased ETA.

Uh yeah. If I've turned to Google maps I don't know that there IS an alternative route, let alone a safer one. For that matter I don't know that the current suggestion is unsafe.
 
2022-08-12 7:49:11 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-08-12 7:50:25 PM  
Will 8 tiny face-punching deer pull a sled to safety - or will they head straight to the south pole to Alternate Santa's workshop?
 
2022-08-12 7:54:08 PM  
That's why I always look at the satellite and street view mode on any potentially sketchy roads.  There are actually quite a few in New Mexico that Google shouldn't recommend.

That's also why I don't trust directions apps, and will never buy a car with Tesla style advanced cruise control.
 
2022-08-12 7:55:30 PM  
First clue should have been the whole completed in 20+ hours thing...
 
2022-08-12 7:57:09 PM  
Akshually I can sorta see how this happened. I just looked up Noccundra Qld (on google!) and to get from there to Adelaide means travelling in a south-south-west direction. The 'safe' roads would mean travelling east or north for literally over a hundred k's from Noccundra to then get a decent route to Adelaide. I can see how Google Maps offered a much more tempting option than travelling in the "wrong" direction for a sizeable distance to stay on sealed or well-maintained-dirt roads.

Still, if you're in Noccundra, you should know that most of the tracks marked on Google are barely existant goat tracks, requiring high level 4WD equipment and skills. So definitely should have known better.
 
2022-08-12 7:59:57 PM  

Aussie_As: cyberspacedout: Article doesn't say what type of car they drove. I'm guessing a Subaru Outback.

There is a LOT of Australia where driving "roads" required a top-of-the-range 4WD. I once went on a camping trip with a friend around the very northernmost bits of South Australia in a Toyota Landcruiser and the only other vehicles we saw for days were Toyota Landcruisers. Not only would a Subaru Outback let you down, nobody would risk it in a Mitsubishi Pajero or a Range Rover.


Not sure if you missed the joke...
 
2022-08-12 8:03:09 PM  

DRTFA: Aussie_As: cyberspacedout: Article doesn't say what type of car they drove. I'm guessing a Subaru Outback.

There is a LOT of Australia where driving "roads" required a top-of-the-range 4WD. I once went on a camping trip with a friend around the very northernmost bits of South Australia in a Toyota Landcruiser and the only other vehicles we saw for days were Toyota Landcruisers. Not only would a Subaru Outback let you down, nobody would risk it in a Mitsubishi Pajero or a Range Rover.

Not sure if you missed the joke...


Oh 'Outback' was a pun? Yean nah, it's just a third rate 4WD that can handle a beach drive but definitely not handle the Australian outback.
 
2022-08-12 8:05:23 PM  

BlazeTrailer: Know what they would call a human that would offer directions without knowing whether they were safe?


"Bob"?

One thing I learned a long time ago (even with paper maps and stopping at gas stations for directions) is that there are _WAY_ too many people out there who like to look omniscient, and will confidently give you bad directions to wherever you're asking to go.

"The Odeon?  Yeeeaahhhh.   Uhhh, you go ---> (wild wave of arms) thataway for like a mile or so till you get to that gas station and turn left, and then it's a few streets down on your right".
 
2022-08-12 8:06:52 PM  
Of course, it's easy to blame Google Maps for suggesting a bad road, but on the other hand, what the application (and all the other navigation solutions out there) tried to do was find a faster route to the destination. It's entirely up to the driver to decide if a certain route can be used or not

I'd blame Google Maps anyway. If a map doesn't actually let you know if the road you're on is paved or unpaved, improved or unimproved, can't show elevations or facilities or anything else about the route, like it doesn't, then what good is it? If a person isn't familiar with the area, they're going to use a map to, you know, find out where they're going and expect the map to tell them that.

Google Maps is really bad for getting you places even in short city drives; the algorithms don't get how to go past a destination and circle back if it's shorter, for example, it will take you off the freeway before your destination even if it's ten miles away and route you through surface streets instead of taking you one exit past and driving back one block.

I'd use a paper map for any kind of long-distance trip before I'd ever trust Google.
 
2022-08-12 8:13:11 PM  
"We're driving across the continent with two young children, with no paper maps for backup, relying on Google Maps even if it tells us to go on sketchy dirt roads, disregarding Telstra's ABANDON HOPE ALL YE WHO ENTER HERE warnings, with no provisions in case even the slightest thing goes slightly awry..."

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-08-12 8:23:50 PM  

Aussie_As: cyberspacedout: Article doesn't say what type of car they drove. I'm guessing a Subaru Outback.

There is a LOT of Australia where driving "roads" required a top-of-the-range 4WD. I once went on a camping trip with a friend around the very northernmost bits of South Australia in a Toyota Landcruiser and the only other vehicles we saw for days were Toyota Landcruisers. Not only would a Subaru Outback let you down, nobody would risk it in a Mitsubishi Pajero or a Range Rover.


Meh. 20 years ago I drove round Australia in a 20 year old Mitsubishi L300, including into Purnululu and various sandy beach tracks and creek crossings.

Mighty 1.6 litre engine, top speed of about 60mph, but a low range gearbox and locking hubs... plus I had done an off road driving course.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-08-12 8:26:32 PM  

Aussie_As: cyberspacedout: Article doesn't say what type of car they drove. I'm guessing a Subaru Outback.

There is a LOT of Australia where driving "roads" required a top-of-the-range 4WD. I once went on a camping trip with a friend around the very northernmost bits of South Australia in a Toyota Landcruiser and the only other vehicles we saw for days were Toyota Landcruisers. Not only would a Subaru Outback let you down, nobody would risk it in a Mitsubishi Pajero or a Range Rover.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-08-12 8:28:57 PM  

Pert: Aussie_As: cyberspacedout: Article doesn't say what type of car they drove. I'm guessing a Subaru Outback.

There is a LOT of Australia where driving "roads" required a top-of-the-range 4WD. I once went on a camping trip with a friend around the very northernmost bits of South Australia in a Toyota Landcruiser and the only other vehicles we saw for days were Toyota Landcruisers. Not only would a Subaru Outback let you down, nobody would risk it in a Mitsubishi Pajero or a Range Rover.

Meh. 20 years ago I drove round Australia in a 20 year old Mitsubishi L300, including into Purnululu and various sandy beach tracks and creek crossings.

Mighty 1.6 litre engine, top speed of about 60mph, but a low range gearbox and locking hubs... plus I had done an off road driving course.

[Fark user image 400x300]


Respectfully, the roads "around Australia" are a hell of a lot better than the barely existant tracks through the middle of Australia. Purnulu does seem remote admittedly but it's only twenty k's off Highway 1. But yeah, I've driven an L300, what it lacks in grunt it makes up for in character, fond memories.
 
2022-08-12 8:37:00 PM  

Aussie_As: DRTFA: Aussie_As: cyberspacedout: Article doesn't say what type of car they drove. I'm guessing a Subaru Outback.

There is a LOT of Australia where driving "roads" required a top-of-the-range 4WD. I once went on a camping trip with a friend around the very northernmost bits of South Australia in a Toyota Landcruiser and the only other vehicles we saw for days were Toyota Landcruisers. Not only would a Subaru Outback let you down, nobody would risk it in a Mitsubishi Pajero or a Range Rover.

Not sure if you missed the joke...

Oh 'Outback' was a pun? Yean nah, it's just a third rate 4WD that can handle a beach drive but definitely not handle the Australian outback.


They're actually terrible in light sand too, unless you're the rare person who knows how to turn off the traction control. then, just mostly terrible.   The "I have AWD and my car looks off-roady" thing always gets the Subaru people.
 
2022-08-12 8:38:02 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Mapquest tried to lead me the wrong way around Donner Lake one time

/That was years ago, and I still don't trust apps


Hang on. MapQuest actually made an app?  I used to print out their maps on my phone printer in '99, and stuff them in my back pocket on long bike rides through the country. Better than nothing.
 
2022-08-12 8:42:10 PM  

Aussie_As: Pert: Aussie_As: cyberspacedout: Article doesn't say what type of car they drove. I'm guessing a Subaru Outback.

There is a LOT of Australia where driving "roads" required a top-of-the-range 4WD. I once went on a camping trip with a friend around the very northernmost bits of South Australia in a Toyota Landcruiser and the only other vehicles we saw for days were Toyota Landcruisers. Not only would a Subaru Outback let you down, nobody would risk it in a Mitsubishi Pajero or a Range Rover.

Meh. 20 years ago I drove round Australia in a 20 year old Mitsubishi L300, including into Purnululu and various sandy beach tracks and creek crossings.

Mighty 1.6 litre engine, top speed of about 60mph, but a low range gearbox and locking hubs... plus I had done an off road driving course.

[Fark user image 400x300]

Respectfully, the roads "around Australia" are a hell of a lot better than the barely existant tracks through the middle of Australia. Purnulu does seem remote admittedly but it's only twenty k's off Highway 1. But yeah, I've driven an L300, what it lacks in grunt it makes up for in character, fond memories.


I've used a country pack commodore extensively out bush.

(Think 2wd 1980's GM product)

Works quite well however:

It's not really what you have, but more of a understanding of what you can realistically do and a bit of knowledge of about reading the roads your on.

Plus when you are doing it.

I've also spent years bouncing around the bush in 4wd mining exploration vehicles.

People get greedy trying to go too far and too fast in one hit.

It's called the land of "plenty of time and wait a bit" for a reason.
 
2022-08-12 8:44:19 PM  

alex10294: Aussie_As: DRTFA: Aussie_As: cyberspacedout: Article doesn't say what type of car they drove. I'm guessing a Subaru Outback.

There is a LOT of Australia where driving "roads" required a top-of-the-range 4WD. I once went on a camping trip with a friend around the very northernmost bits of South Australia in a Toyota Landcruiser and the only other vehicles we saw for days were Toyota Landcruisers. Not only would a Subaru Outback let you down, nobody would risk it in a Mitsubishi Pajero or a Range Rover.

Not sure if you missed the joke...

Oh 'Outback' was a pun? Yean nah, it's just a third rate 4WD that can handle a beach drive but definitely not handle the Australian outback.

They're actually terrible in light sand too, unless you're the rare person who knows how to turn off the traction control. then, just mostly terrible.   The "I have AWD and my car looks off-roady" thing always gets the Subaru people.


No sump guards, bash plates and stone guards.

Throw in longer distances and people end up in trouble.
 
2022-08-12 8:47:39 PM  
Well, duh.  Because Google Maps will do that anywhere in the world.  Calling it a "map" and trying to navigate by it is about as effective as using the maps in the yellow pages to navigate and for the same reason.

Do yourself a favor, get you something that uses OpenStreetMap to navigate by.  Most cars that have onboard nav in the last 10 years, anything by Rand McNally in the last few years and the maps.me, Magic Earth and Osmand apps all use OpenStreetMap.  Maps people can fix are maps that don't tend to get people lost.
 
2022-08-12 8:56:44 PM  
The road between Winton and Longreach was pretty decent, but Winton to Hughenden was a 2 lane strip with more dead roos than I could count.
 
2022-08-12 9:00:51 PM  

Aussie_As: DRTFA: Aussie_As: cyberspacedout: Article doesn't say what type of car they drove. I'm guessing a Subaru Outback.

There is a LOT of Australia where driving "roads" required a top-of-the-range 4WD. I once went on a camping trip with a friend around the very northernmost bits of South Australia in a Toyota Landcruiser and the only other vehicles we saw for days were Toyota Landcruisers. Not only would a Subaru Outback let you down, nobody would risk it in a Mitsubishi Pajero or a Range Rover.

Not sure if you missed the joke...

Oh 'Outback' was a pun? Yean nah, it's just a third rate 4WD that can handle a beach drive but definitely not handle the Australian outback.


Well, it was over your head, if you were down under.
 
2022-08-12 9:06:51 PM  

Baloo Uriza: Well, duh.  Because Google Maps will do that anywhere in the world.  Calling it a "map" and trying to navigate by it is about as effective as using the maps in the yellow pages to navigate and for the same reason.

Do yourself a favor, get you something that uses OpenStreetMap to navigate by.  Most cars that have onboard nav in the last 10 years, anything by Rand McNally in the last few years and the maps.me, Magic Earth and Osmand apps all use OpenStreetMap.  Maps people can fix are maps that don't tend to get people lost.


And it seems to take forever for Google Maps to get updated with new roads.  For years every time I drove down the east coast of Australia past Byron Bay and Ballina it was convinced I had driven off the road into the bush.
 
2022-08-12 9:09:39 PM  
Don't blame Google maps ever.   Or your mechanic.  Or anyone at all.   It comes down to you.

The driver is directly responsible for, and is the final authority as to, the operation of the vehicle.
 
2022-08-12 9:26:22 PM  
F**kin' Google Maps showed me exactly where I was, but didn't show the road I was on, or the ones that would lead me back to the highway.

I dug my old paper map out of the glove box and I was back on track in a couple of minutes.
 
2022-08-12 9:49:32 PM  
My random incomplete memory recalls reading about a scientific reason (perhaps relatively swift continental shelf drift?) GPS is always jacked up in Australia.
 
2022-08-12 10:04:59 PM  
2.bp.blogspot.comView Full Size
 
2022-08-12 10:15:32 PM  

Aussie_As: Pert: Aussie_As: cyberspacedout: Article doesn't say what type of car they drove. I'm guessing a Subaru Outback.

There is a LOT of Australia where driving "roads" required a top-of-the-range 4WD. I once went on a camping trip with a friend around the very northernmost bits of South Australia in a Toyota Landcruiser and the only other vehicles we saw for days were Toyota Landcruisers. Not only would a Subaru Outback let you down, nobody would risk it in a Mitsubishi Pajero or a Range Rover.

Meh. 20 years ago I drove round Australia in a 20 year old Mitsubishi L300, including into Purnululu and various sandy beach tracks and creek crossings.

Mighty 1.6 litre engine, top speed of about 60mph, but a low range gearbox and locking hubs... plus I had done an off road driving course.

[Fark user image 400x300]

Respectfully, the roads "around Australia" are a hell of a lot better than the barely existant tracks through the middle of Australia. Purnululu does seem remote admittedly but it's only twenty k's off Highway 1. But yeah, I've driven an L300, what it lacks in grunt it makes up for in character, fond memories.


My (largish) family had an L300 when I was a kid... glad someone has fond memories of those shiatboxes.  I mean, it didn't kill us while we were busy killing each other, so I guess that's a plus.

And my favourite Google Maps story (long since corrected, sadly) is the narrow, winding, unpaved footpath up a 40°-odd slope in the outer suburbs of Adelaide that it had down as a straight, trafficable city street.  At least nobody was going to get themselves killed driving up it, because behind the wheel of a Camry you couldn't see the bloody thing.
 
2022-08-12 10:18:16 PM  

caira: Aussie_As: Pert: Aussie_As: cyberspacedout: Article doesn't say what type of car they drove. I'm guessing a Subaru Outback.

There is a LOT of Australia where driving "roads" required a top-of-the-range 4WD. I once went on a camping trip with a friend around the very northernmost bits of South Australia in a Toyota Landcruiser and the only other vehicles we saw for days were Toyota Landcruisers. Not only would a Subaru Outback let you down, nobody would risk it in a Mitsubishi Pajero or a Range Rover.

Meh. 20 years ago I drove round Australia in a 20 year old Mitsubishi L300, including into Purnululu and various sandy beach tracks and creek crossings.

Mighty 1.6 litre engine, top speed of about 60mph, but a low range gearbox and locking hubs... plus I had done an off road driving course.

[Fark user image 400x300]

Respectfully, the roads "around Australia" are a hell of a lot better than the barely existant tracks through the middle of Australia. Purnululu does seem remote admittedly but it's only twenty k's off Highway 1. But yeah, I've driven an L300, what it lacks in grunt it makes up for in character, fond memories.

My (largish) family had an L300 when I was a kid... glad someone has fond memories of those shiatboxes.  I mean, it didn't kill us while we were busy killing each other, so I guess that's a plus.

And my favourite Google Maps story (long since corrected, sadly) is the narrow, winding, unpaved footpath up a 40°-odd slope in the outer suburbs of Adelaide that it had down as a straight, trafficable city street.  At least nobody was going to get themselves killed driving up it, because behind the wheel of a Camry you couldn't see the bloody thing.


There's a NPS site where the streetview truck went along an unpaved staff-only path (think for utility off-road vehicles and walking only) through ruins, instead of along the paved driveway leading from the street to the visitor center parking lot.
 
2022-08-12 10:21:22 PM  

alex10294: Aussie_As: DRTFA: Aussie_As: cyberspacedout: Article doesn't say what type of car they drove. I'm guessing a Subaru Outback.

There is a LOT of Australia where driving "roads" required a top-of-the-range 4WD. I once went on a camping trip with a friend around the very northernmost bits of South Australia in a Toyota Landcruiser and the only other vehicles we saw for days were Toyota Landcruisers. Not only would a Subaru Outback let you down, nobody would risk it in a Mitsubishi Pajero or a Range Rover.

Not sure if you missed the joke...

Oh 'Outback' was a pun? Yean nah, it's just a third rate 4WD that can handle a beach drive but definitely not handle the Australian outback.

They're actually terrible in light sand too, unless you're the rare person who knows how to turn off the traction control. then, just mostly terrible.   The "I have AWD and my car looks off-roady" thing always gets the Subaru people.


Not sure if it's true anymore but the older ones I had with a standard transmission had a special fluid hub in the center, like the one developed for the AMC Eagle and used in several Jeeps over the years.
It was reasonably capable on sand beaches as a limited slip full time center differential. The automatics were primarily front wheel drive with sensors to transfer power via clutches.
I'm not sure if that's changed but try finding a stick shift.
 
2022-08-12 10:39:51 PM  

caira: Aussie_As: Pert: Aussie_As: cyberspacedout: Article doesn't say what type of car they drove. I'm guessing a Subaru Outback.

There is a LOT of Australia where driving "roads" required a top-of-the-range 4WD. I once went on a camping trip with a friend around the very northernmost bits of South Australia in a Toyota Landcruiser and the only other vehicles we saw for days were Toyota Landcruisers. Not only would a Subaru Outback let you down, nobody would risk it in a Mitsubishi Pajero or a Range Rover.

Meh. 20 years ago I drove round Australia in a 20 year old Mitsubishi L300, including into Purnululu and various sandy beach tracks and creek crossings.

Mighty 1.6 litre engine, top speed of about 60mph, but a low range gearbox and locking hubs... plus I had done an off road driving course.

[Fark user image 400x300]

Respectfully, the roads "around Australia" are a hell of a lot better than the barely existant tracks through the middle of Australia. Purnululu does seem remote admittedly but it's only twenty k's off Highway 1. But yeah, I've driven an L300, what it lacks in grunt it makes up for in character, fond memories.

My (largish) family had an L300 when I was a kid... glad someone has fond memories of those shiatboxes.  I mean, it didn't kill us while we were busy killing each other, so I guess that's a plus.

And my favourite Google Maps story (long since corrected, sadly) is the narrow, winding, unpaved footpath up a 40°-odd slope in the outer suburbs of Adelaide that it had down as a straight, trafficable city street.  At least nobody was going to get themselves killed driving up it, because behind the wheel of a Camry you couldn't see the bloody thing.


When I was an apprentice, work had one as a bongo van.

4spd column shift.
 
2022-08-12 10:45:03 PM  

The Irresponsible Captain: alex10294: Aussie_As: DRTFA: Aussie_As: cyberspacedout: Article doesn't say what type of car they drove. I'm guessing a Subaru Outback.

There is a LOT of Australia where driving "roads" required a top-of-the-range 4WD. I once went on a camping trip with a friend around the very northernmost bits of South Australia in a Toyota Landcruiser and the only other vehicles we saw for days were Toyota Landcruisers. Not only would a Subaru Outback let you down, nobody would risk it in a Mitsubishi Pajero or a Range Rover.

Not sure if you missed the joke...

Oh 'Outback' was a pun? Yean nah, it's just a third rate 4WD that can handle a beach drive but definitely not handle the Australian outback.

They're actually terrible in light sand too, unless you're the rare person who knows how to turn off the traction control. then, just mostly terrible.   The "I have AWD and my car looks off-roady" thing always gets the Subaru people.

Not sure if it's true anymore but the older ones I had with a standard transmission had a special fluid hub in the center, like the one developed for the AMC Eagle and used in several Jeeps over the years.
It was reasonably capable on sand beaches as a limited slip full time center differential. The automatics were primarily front wheel drive with sensors to transfer power via clutches.
I'm not sure if that's changed but try finding a stick shift.


I had a pair of mid '80s Subaru GL wagons as $1000 or so beater cars in my late teens. For me being able to shift to 4WD with just a lever was a cool, but rarely used feature. I think the biggest use I got out of it was the one time I broke down, I think it was something with the drive shaft, but lost all power to the rear wheels. I had the brilliant idea of shifting it to 4WD and was able to drive home on FWD.
 
2022-08-12 11:57:25 PM  

Denjiro: I had the brilliant idea of shifting it to 4WD and was able to drive home on FWD.


Yep, not uncommon.  In a real pinch you disconnect the read driveshaft if you've completely wrecked the read diff.  Driving home on the front driveshaft is definitely a thing.
 
2022-08-13 1:16:49 AM  
I worked out of Kalgoorlie as a surveyors field assistant for a while.  If we were going any distance from town (400+km) then we took a sat phone and food and water for at least four days and a couple of spare tyres and rims for the Landcruiser.  Help is a long time coming out there and you aren't walking far in 40deg C  heat.
 
2022-08-13 3:36:47 AM  

asymptonic: Denjiro: I had the brilliant idea of shifting it to 4WD and was able to drive home on FWD.

Yep, not uncommon.  In a real pinch you disconnect the read driveshaft if you've completely wrecked the read diff.  Driving home on the front driveshaft is definitely a thing.


You will however rue the day you decided to weld your front spider gears instead of installing a proper diff locker.
 
2022-08-13 3:58:24 AM  

Aussie_As: Pert: Aussie_As: cyberspacedout: Article doesn't say what type of car they drove. I'm guessing a Subaru Outback.

There is a LOT of Australia where driving "roads" required a top-of-the-range 4WD. I once went on a camping trip with a friend around the very northernmost bits of South Australia in a Toyota Landcruiser and the only other vehicles we saw for days were Toyota Landcruisers. Not only would a Subaru Outback let you down, nobody would risk it in a Mitsubishi Pajero or a Range Rover.

Meh. 20 years ago I drove round Australia in a 20 year old Mitsubishi L300, including into Purnululu and various sandy beach tracks and creek crossings.

Mighty 1.6 litre engine, top speed of about 60mph, but a low range gearbox and locking hubs... plus I had done an off road driving course.

[Fark user image 400x300]

Respectfully, the roads "around Australia" are a hell of a lot better than the barely existant tracks through the middle of Australia. Purnulu does seem remote admittedly but it's only twenty k's off Highway 1. But yeah, I've driven an L300, what it lacks in grunt it makes up for in character, fond memories.


""To get into Purnululu National Park, you can drive or fly. The road is only suitable for 4WD vehicles and takes 2 -3 hours to drive the 53 km into the park from the Great Northern Highway. If you have the time and the inclination to adventure in by road, it is absolutely worth it."

https://www.bunglebungleguidedtours.com.au/news/where-to-start-your-bungle-bungle-adventure/#:~:text=To%20get%20into%20Purnululu%20National,it%20is%20absolutely%20worth%20it.

It's 53km that takes 3 hours and involves at least one creek crossing. They advise you to bring at least 2 spare wheels with you.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-08-13 9:52:14 AM  
lh3.googleusercontent.comView Full Size


No problems, mate!
 
2022-08-13 1:48:40 PM  

stuartp9: And it seems to take forever for Google Maps to get updated with new roads.


There's still a lot of streets in Tulsa (most glaringly I 244, which was renamed for Martin Luther King in the early 90s) that it lists with names that those roads haven't had since before Google existed.
 
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