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(Big Think)   From simply considering, "could dark matter actually be radiation, instead," there's a tremendous set of lessons the Universe can teach us about its very nature   (bigthink.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Dark matter, Galaxy, Universe, Big Bang, General relativity, Gravitation, dark matter problem, Atom  
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681 clicks; posted to STEM » on 12 Aug 2022 at 7:38 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



12 Comments     (+0 »)
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2022-08-12 10:32:05 AM  
That would dark energy, no?
 
2022-08-12 10:32:40 AM  

ArcadianRefugee: That would dark energy, no?


Be.  "That would be dark energy...."
 
2022-08-12 11:10:47 AM  

ArcadianRefugee: That would dark energy, no?


The fundamental question was a pretty stupid one.

What about the possibility that this "missing mass" is actually light, or at least some other form of massless radiation?

Among other issues, it's not missing mass, it's extra mass. The mass needed at many scales, to see things like galactic clumping, proper galactic rotation, etc... Is more mass, not less. It had to be something that is currently mass. Not mass that went away (into massless energy).

It's the type of question that only gets asked by someone with absolutely no understanding of the issue on any level, and misheard something about it at a bar once.
 
2022-08-12 1:06:36 PM  
What if it's the weight of all the empty space?
 
2022-08-12 1:26:14 PM  
My bet is on luminiferous Aether.
 
2022-08-12 2:21:26 PM  
In other words, we are now watching a phd ask questions that would get them thrown out of the building by real scientists
 
2022-08-12 3:20:21 PM  

Nurglitch: What if it's the weight of all the empty space?


weirdly, in my limited understanding it should have a weight, but that is because quantum fluctuations show it not to really empty ????
 
2022-08-12 4:20:07 PM  

hegelsghost: Nurglitch: What if it's the weight of all the empty space?

weirdly, in my limited understanding it should have a weight, but that is because quantum fluctuations show it not to really empty ????


Correcto.

A major problem in physics is that the energy density predicted by that method is way off.
 
2022-08-12 4:21:14 PM  

Concrete Donkey: In other words, we are now watching a phd ask questions that would get them thrown out of the building by real scientists


Bring it up with the person who asked him the question.
 
2022-08-12 6:34:46 PM  

Metaluna Mutant: My bet is on luminiferous Aether.


And phlogiston. Big gobs of it
 
2022-08-12 9:21:18 PM  

hegelsghost: Nurglitch: What if it's the weight of all the empty space?

weirdly, in my limited understanding it should have a weight, but that is because quantum fluctuations show it not to really empty ????


I meant mass (sorry natural philosophers!) but apparently that assumption over-estimates the amount of mass in empty space? I mean, how little vacuum energy would we need for it not to agree with the value of missing dark matter?
 
2022-08-12 11:03:30 PM  
I think we have means of detecting radiation
 
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