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(Politico)   NYC moves forward with plans to raise (pinky to mouth) billions via congestion pricing. Bonus, a lot of the revenue comes from charging tolls on their own buses   (politico.com) divider line
    More: Misc, New York City, Manhattan, New Jersey, NEW YORK, The Bronx, congestion pricing plan, environmental review of the program, New York  
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599 clicks; posted to Politics » on 11 Aug 2022 at 1:35 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-08-11 10:59:34 AM  
This clearly needs to be done but I wish they'd simultaneously work on making the subways a little less, um, entertaining.... It's a lot easier to want to do your part when it doesn't involve being shaken down and generally accosted continuously.
 
2022-08-11 11:07:22 AM  
Wait, infrastructure costs money?

I, for one, blame Robert Moses.
 
2022-08-11 11:25:12 AM  

flucto: a little less, um, entertaining


while the express trains are super convenient, they are also too ... entertaining.  Getting to the point I'd almost rather take the local
 
2022-08-11 11:34:26 AM  
We don't have the infrastructure to handle the extra people on the subways. It doesn't help that we're building all these new apartment buildings adding people to the already strained subway system.

Also, what do we do about the people that live in the zone that have cars? Do they get a perpetual free pass?

And parking. At least on the Upper East Side, it's hell and a half. Having the permanent restaurant outdoor seating on the streets doesn't help.

I like the concept of congestion pricing, but there are more questions than answers.
 
2022-08-11 12:25:17 PM  

Alley Rat: We don't have the infrastructure to handle the extra people on the subways. It doesn't help that we're building all these new apartment buildings adding people to the already strained subway system.

Also, what do we do about the people that live in the zone that have cars? Do they get a perpetual free pass?

And parking. At least on the Upper East Side, it's hell and a half. Having the permanent restaurant outdoor seating on the streets doesn't help.

I like the concept of congestion pricing, but there are more questions than answers.


My man sounds like every NIMBY at every single city council meeting ever. Woof.
 
2022-08-11 12:38:51 PM  

Dusk-You-n-Me: Alley Rat: We don't have the infrastructure to handle the extra people on the subways. It doesn't help that we're building all these new apartment buildings adding people to the already strained subway system.

Also, what do we do about the people that live in the zone that have cars? Do they get a perpetual free pass?

And parking. At least on the Upper East Side, it's hell and a half. Having the permanent restaurant outdoor seating on the streets doesn't help.

I like the concept of congestion pricing, but there are more questions than answers.

My man sounds like every NIMBY at every single city council meeting ever. Woof.


I came to say: it sounds like this thing is going to get NIMBY-ed to death, particularly by Jersey and the Bronx, among others.
 
2022-08-11 1:30:28 PM  

Naido: Dusk-You-n-Me: Alley Rat: We don't have the infrastructure to handle the extra people on the subways. It doesn't help that we're building all these new apartment buildings adding people to the already strained subway system.

Also, what do we do about the people that live in the zone that have cars? Do they get a perpetual free pass?

And parking. At least on the Upper East Side, it's hell and a half. Having the permanent restaurant outdoor seating on the streets doesn't help.

I like the concept of congestion pricing, but there are more questions than answers.

My man sounds like every NIMBY at every single city council meeting ever. Woof.

I came to say: it sounds like this thing is going to get NIMBY-ed to death, particularly by Jersey and the Bronx, among others.


They need the revenue pretty badly... it will pass no matter what they have to do.
 
2022-08-11 1:44:37 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


This will be such a burden to rich people who refuse to use a helicopter to get a haircut.
 
2022-08-11 1:45:51 PM  
Always the little guy paying the bills.
 
2022-08-11 1:46:38 PM  
I know it's hard to believe that someone would post a misleading headline on Fark, but it does rarely happen. No where in the article does it say that lot of revenue from congestion pricing would come from buses. (An of course it isn't revenue if you're charging yourself). What it does say is:

The environmental review assesses seven different tolling scenarios, each with different combinations of potential discounts, crossing credits and exemptions. Fares range from $9 to $23 for passenger vehicles and between $12 and $82 for trucks. Some scenarios contemplate exemptions for taxis, while others cap the number of times certain vehicles can be charged in a single day. There are even options under which the MTA's own buses must pay the toll, effectively resulting in the agency paying itself.

I somehow doubt they'll adopt a scheme under which they charge themselves a toll.
 
2022-08-11 1:50:22 PM  
A congestion charge has in place and (I think?) working in London for years, so *shrug*
 
2022-08-11 1:50:43 PM  

menschenfresser: A congestion charge has been in place and (I think?) working in London for years, so *shrug*


FTFM
 
2022-08-11 1:54:33 PM  

misanthropicsob: [Fark user image image 425x258]

This will be such a burden to rich people who refuse to use a helicopter to get a haircut.


You can't use a helicopter to get a haircut because the blades blow the air down. You could hang upside down and be slowly lowered towards the blades for a haircut, but that's just silly.
 
2022-08-11 1:56:44 PM  

menschenfresser: A congestion charge has in place and (I think?) working in London for years, so *shrug*


Yep, and the net result was...less cars on the street and better air quality.

It's hellish, I tell you.
 
2022-08-11 2:01:00 PM  
Yet another reason in favor of WFH for people living in North Jersey, Long Island, and Connecticut.
 
2022-08-11 2:01:30 PM  

NewportBarGuy: Wait, infrastructure costs money?

I, for one, blame Robert Moses.


Not only was Moses a virulent classist and racist who did everything in his power to destroy public transit and encourage the use of the private automobile he loved so much, he didn't even know how to drive!!!  He never learned how.  He just had his chauffeur drive him everywhere.

And he did more than any other individual to drive the Dodgers out of Brooklyn.
 
2022-08-11 2:04:29 PM  

hissatsu: ...
There are even options under which the MTA's own buses must pay the toll, effectively resulting in the agency paying itself.

I somehow doubt they'll adopt a scheme under which they charge themselves a toll.


What the article misses is one scenario includes a charge on all busses. MTA busses would have to pay otherwise you'd have NJ transit screaming (and probably the private charter bus companies also for whatever reason) their busses should also be exempt as commuter busses.
 
2022-08-11 2:07:56 PM  

hissatsu: I somehow doubt they'll adopt a scheme under which they charge themselves a toll.


I think the point is not so much that they're charging themselves a toll but that they'd be fudging the revenue numbers by including something that's not really revenue.

Alley Rat: We don't have the infrastructure to handle the extra people on the subways. It doesn't help that we're building all these new apartment buildings adding people to the already strained subway system.


The whole point is that congestion pricing will raise revenues that will allow the MTA to cover the costs of capital spending.

Also, what do we do about the people that live in the zone that have cars? Do they get a perpetual free pass?

Do a lot of people living below 60th St own cars and drive them around during business hours? That seems to defeat the purpose of living there.

And parking. At least on the Upper East Side, it's hell and a half. Having the permanent restaurant outdoor seating on the streets doesn't help.

So your expectation is that people who are already driving into lower Manhattan and paying $70 a day to park their cars will be so deterred by the $23 a day congestion fee that they will go out of their way to circle around for half an hour on the Upper East Side hunting for a parking spot that's still 15-30 minutes away from their office?
 
2022-08-11 2:15:42 PM  
Old: robbing Peter to pay Paul
New: crediting both Peter's and Paul's accounts
 
2022-08-11 2:21:10 PM  
Maybe we should relocate the offices to Newark?
 
2022-08-11 2:22:31 PM  

menschenfresser: menschenfresser: A congestion charge has been in place and (I think?) working in London for years, so *shrug*

FTFM


There is almost no reason to own a car in NYC. Cars should be restricted to main roads only. East River, FDR, Broadway, Houston, 14th, 34th, 42nd, 59th, 125th and above. That's Manhattan. Queens and Bronx. Whatever. Brooklyn only parts not accessible to the B Q R D N F 2. Staten Island? I hear they have a good restaurant or two there. Maybe I'll visit someday and get back to you. Rode the ferry there a couple times just because was high and it was free.

Commercial vehicles of course.

But almost all of Manhattan and like 70% of Brooklyn should be car free. Most traffic should be pedestrian, bikes, cabs, Uber, scooters, maybe vespa type crap.
 
2022-08-11 2:25:21 PM  
Doesn't matter. It could raise $0 dollars and still be a good idea. Actually it could cost money and still be a good idea.
 
2022-08-11 2:25:56 PM  
This would be fine if the roads weren't such shiat.
 
2022-08-11 2:29:00 PM  
Gov. Kathy Hochul is pushing ahead on a congestion pricing plan that would raise billions in revenue for public transit projects and promises to significantly decrease traffic into Manhattan's central business and tourism district


media0.giphy.comView Full Size


Please proceed, Governor.  This is exactly the plan NYC needs right now.
 
2022-08-11 2:32:24 PM  
I've been reading Thomas Sowell's book Economic Facts and Fallacies, and while I disagree with his opinions on policies and solutions, I can't disagree on the results of the case studies he cited. Interestingly enough he speaks on congestion pricing. He cited a couple of instances where congestion pricing, specifically charging tolls during certain times of the day, was more effective at reducing congestion than building more traffic lanes. So, this might be a good idea for NYC.

Honestly, I never thought in a million years I'd be quoting that factoid, but here we are.

Here are relevant pages and the citations. I hope it's readable.

Fark user imageView Full Size


Fark user imageView Full Size


Fark user imageView Full Size


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-08-11 2:33:15 PM  

Naido: I came to say: it sounds like this thing is going to get NIMBY-ed to death, particularly by Jersey and the Bronx, among others.


Jersey's going to complain regardless. Back in the day, there was a commuter tax. They complained until Sheldon Silver decided to remove it.

I say bring back the commuter tax.

As for congestion pricing, if it's during peak hours, I'm ok with it, just have to make sure that people don't try to get around it as New Yorkers are wont to do.
 
2022-08-11 2:35:04 PM  

Zeb Hesselgresser: Gov. Kathy Hochul is pushing ahead on a congestion pricing plan that would raise billions in revenue for public transit projects and promises to significantly decrease traffic into Manhattan's central business and tourism district


[media0.giphy.com image 290x200] [View Full Size image _x_]

Please proceed, Governor.  This is exactly the plan NYC needs right now.


You're shiatting on it just to shiat on it. No one is clamoring to drive in Podunk.
 
2022-08-11 2:59:01 PM  

foo monkey: misanthropicsob: [Fark user image image 425x258]

This will be such a burden to rich people who refuse to use a helicopter to get a haircut.

You can't use a helicopter to get a haircut because the blades blow the air down. You could hang upside down and be slowly lowered towards the blades for a haircut, but that's just silly.


Most people don't know that helicopters have a switch you can flip and the blades will go in the reverse, which is helpful for winter.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-08-11 3:12:42 PM  

Alley Rat: We don't have the infrastructure to handle the extra people on the subways. It doesn't help that we're building all these new apartment buildings adding people to the already strained subway system.

Also, what do we do about the people that live in the zone that have cars? Do they get a perpetual free pass?

And parking. At least on the Upper East Side, it's hell and a half. Having the permanent restaurant outdoor seating on the streets doesn't help.

I like the concept of congestion pricing, but there are more questions than answers.


Hells Kitchen and the whole West Side still has a gob shiat ton of space to expand, not to mention plenty of space for a new subway line or two.

How the fark do we still not have any subways west of 8th Avenue other than the Times Square to Hudson Yards extension on the 7 line?
 
2022-08-11 3:28:20 PM  

UNC_Samurai: NewportBarGuy: Wait, infrastructure costs money?

I, for one, blame Robert Moses.

Not only was Moses a virulent classist and racist who did everything in his power to destroy public transit and encourage the use of the private automobile he loved so much, he didn't even know how to drive!!!  He never learned how.  He just had his chauffeur drive him everywhere.

And he did more than any other individual to drive the Dodgers out of Brooklyn.


Yup... he built these things just to get to a strip of sand where I grew up.

d2adk2xmyr6r91.cloudfront.netView Full Size
 
2022-08-11 3:41:56 PM  

Flushing It All Away: Hells Kitchen and the whole West Side still has a gob shiat ton of space to expand, not to mention plenty of space for a new subway line or two.

How the fark do we still not have any subways west of 8th Avenue other than the Times Square to Hudson Yards extension on the 7 line?


I'm still pissed that there isn't even a shell of the 10th Avenue station on the 7.
 
2022-08-11 3:47:26 PM  

Flushing It All Away: Hells Kitchen and the whole West Side still has a gob shiat ton of space to expand, not to mention plenty of space for a new subway line or two.

How the fark do we still not have any subways west of 8th Avenue other than the Times Square to Hudson Yards extension on the 7 line?


Also, way back in the day, there were three separate subway systems that competed with each other. Fun fact: on the 42nd street station on the A C E (IND), there's a lower level that was built specifically to block the 7 (IRT) from expanding west. It was destroyed when the 7 was expanded.
 
2022-08-11 4:29:41 PM  

Alley Rat: Flushing It All Away: Hells Kitchen and the whole West Side still has a gob shiat ton of space to expand, not to mention plenty of space for a new subway line or two.

How the fark do we still not have any subways west of 8th Avenue other than the Times Square to Hudson Yards extension on the 7 line?

Also, way back in the day, there were three separate subway systems that competed with each other. Fun fact: on the 42nd street station on the A C E (IND), there's a lower level that was built specifically to block the 7 (IRT) from expanding west. It was destroyed when the 7 was expanded.


Somewhere in my brain I knew that factoid, but thank you for reminding me. Yes, the legacy systems that the MTA has muscled together is a shiat show.
 
2022-08-11 4:35:34 PM  

Alley Rat: Flushing It All Away: Hells Kitchen and the whole West Side still has a gob shiat ton of space to expand, not to mention plenty of space for a new subway line or two.

How the fark do we still not have any subways west of 8th Avenue other than the Times Square to Hudson Yards extension on the 7 line?

Also, way back in the day, there were three separate subway systems that competed with each other. Fun fact: on the 42nd street station on the A C E (IND), there's a lower level that was built specifically to block the 7 (IRT) from expanding west. It was destroyed when the 7 was expanded.


When I moved from Zurich back to NY I read a story about how the LIRR was going to be connected to Grand Central and that it would be done by 2004, I think.  Maybe 15 years after that I read a story in the NYT that said that digging tunnels in NYC was 10x more expensive than anywhere else in the world and that it was in large part due to union regulations that insist on having "crane oilers" and "cafeteria staff" on site, even though the tunnels have neither cranes nor cafeterias. And the NYT isn't exactly anti-union.

That's all just TLDR for "we really suck at building infrastructure."
 
2022-08-11 4:37:02 PM  
I wish Chicago would start doing congestion pricing. That, and add tolls to the Kennedy and the Ryan.
 
2022-08-11 4:38:07 PM  

flucto: Alley Rat: Flushing It All Away: Hells Kitchen and the whole West Side still has a gob shiat ton of space to expand, not to mention plenty of space for a new subway line or two.

How the fark do we still not have any subways west of 8th Avenue other than the Times Square to Hudson Yards extension on the 7 line?

Also, way back in the day, there were three separate subway systems that competed with each other. Fun fact: on the 42nd street station on the A C E (IND), there's a lower level that was built specifically to block the 7 (IRT) from expanding west. It was destroyed when the 7 was expanded.

When I moved from Zurich back to NY I read a story about how the LIRR was going to be connected to Grand Central and that it would be done by 2004, I think.  Maybe 15 years after that I read a story in the NYT that said that digging tunnels in NYC was 10x more expensive than anywhere else in the world and that it was in large part due to union regulations that insist on having "crane oilers" and "cafeteria staff" on site, even though the tunnels have neither cranes nor cafeterias. And the NYT isn't exactly anti-union.

That's all just TLDR for "we really suck at building infrastructure."


Fingers crossed, it should be running this fall. The MTA has been hyping the LIRR into Grand Central hard this summer.

For those NYers here: Is it L-I-Double R, or the LIRR (lurrrrr)? Had a fun argument with my coworkers a couple weeks ago about this and there was several answers that caught me by surprise.
 
2022-08-11 4:43:16 PM  

Flushing It All Away: it should be running this fall.


Does that mean:

1. it will be easier to get to JFK from GCT? That would be ok.
2. People from Long Island will find it easier to get to CT? That would be... unfortunate.
3. If I'm really hammered I could get on the wrong train and find myself wandering around the five towns looking for a taxi to Fairfield?
 
2022-08-11 5:03:32 PM  
It already costs the Earth to cross into NYC.
 
2022-08-11 5:19:27 PM  

flucto: Flushing It All Away: it should be running this fall.

Does that mean:

1. it will be easier to get to JFK from GCT? That would be ok.
2. People from Long Island will find it easier to get to CT? That would be... unfortunate.
3. If I'm really hammered I could get on the wrong train and find myself wandering around the five towns looking for a taxi to Fairfield?


1. If you insist on taking it to Jamaica, maybe.
2. If they don't want to drive, yes, but it'll cost a pretty penny.
3. The LIRR platforms are on a whole new level (like 10 stories deep). You'd have to want to go to Five Towns.
 
2022-08-11 6:09:03 PM  

flucto: This clearly needs to be done but I wish they'd simultaneously work on making the subways a little less, um, entertaining.... It's a lot easier to want to do your part when it doesn't involve being shaken down and generally accosted continuously.


Where is this happening to you?  I take the subway almost every day. I'm not being shaken down or accosted. Do you mean the people asking for money after a short sob story?
 
2022-08-11 6:13:10 PM  

FitzShivering: flucto: This clearly needs to be done but I wish they'd simultaneously work on making the subways a little less, um, entertaining.... It's a lot easier to want to do your part when it doesn't involve being shaken down and generally accosted continuously.

Where is this happening to you?  I take the subway almost every day. I'm not being shaken down or accosted. Do you mean the people asking for money after a short sob story?


The NQRW and the 123 are farking horrific. I also transfer at crackhead city, aka, Penn Station.

God damn. They need to move the gates to the top of the stairs instead of the bottom.
 
2022-08-11 6:14:25 PM  

Arkanaut: hissatsu: I somehow doubt they'll adopt a scheme under which they charge themselves a toll.

I think the point is not so much that they're charging themselves a toll but that they'd be fudging the revenue numbers by including something that's not really revenue.

Alley Rat: We don't have the infrastructure to handle the extra people on the subways. It doesn't help that we're building all these new apartment buildings adding people to the already strained subway system.

The whole point is that congestion pricing will raise revenues that will allow the MTA to cover the costs of capital spending.

Also, what do we do about the people that live in the zone that have cars? Do they get a perpetual free pass?

Do a lot of people living below 60th St own cars and drive them around during business hours? That seems to defeat the purpose of living there.

And parking. At least on the Upper East Side, it's hell and a half. Having the permanent restaurant outdoor seating on the streets doesn't help.

So your expectation is that people who are already driving into lower Manhattan and paying $70 a day to park their cars will be so deterred by the $23 a day congestion fee that they will go out of their way to circle around for half an hour on the Upper East Side hunting for a parking spot that's still 15-30 minutes away from their office?


It doesn't make any sense in general.  Excluding those with disabilities (which I believe, in at least one version of this, were not going to be charged), why would you regularly drive your car into Midtown or LES?  Why do you even have a car in NYC?  I had one here for a year or two and then realized the only time it was less of a hassle to use than not was when I was leaving the city to go somewhere else.

People complain about the MTA, but come on, it's glorious being able to get around with no car.
 
2022-08-11 6:18:33 PM  

Flushing It All Away: FitzShivering: flucto: This clearly needs to be done but I wish they'd simultaneously work on making the subways a little less, um, entertaining.... It's a lot easier to want to do your part when it doesn't involve being shaken down and generally accosted continuously.

Where is this happening to you?  I take the subway almost every day. I'm not being shaken down or accosted. Do you mean the people asking for money after a short sob story?

The NQRW and the 123 are farking horrific. I also transfer at crackhead city, aka, Penn Station.

God damn. They need to move the gates to the top of the stairs instead of the bottom.


Thanks. I'm very rarely on the 1-2-3 other than heading up to Harlem once a week. The only place I've seen something close to this was 125/Lex, which admittedly gets a bit wonky at 2 or 3 am.  But if it isn't that late, it's fine.

Figured it had to be regional.
 
2022-08-11 6:19:02 PM  

FitzShivering: Arkanaut: hissatsu: I somehow doubt they'll adopt a scheme under which they charge themselves a toll.

I think the point is not so much that they're charging themselves a toll but that they'd be fudging the revenue numbers by including something that's not really revenue.

Alley Rat: We don't have the infrastructure to handle the extra people on the subways. It doesn't help that we're building all these new apartment buildings adding people to the already strained subway system.

The whole point is that congestion pricing will raise revenues that will allow the MTA to cover the costs of capital spending.

Also, what do we do about the people that live in the zone that have cars? Do they get a perpetual free pass?

Do a lot of people living below 60th St own cars and drive them around during business hours? That seems to defeat the purpose of living there.

And parking. At least on the Upper East Side, it's hell and a half. Having the permanent restaurant outdoor seating on the streets doesn't help.

So your expectation is that people who are already driving into lower Manhattan and paying $70 a day to park their cars will be so deterred by the $23 a day congestion fee that they will go out of their way to circle around for half an hour on the Upper East Side hunting for a parking spot that's still 15-30 minutes away from their office?

It doesn't make any sense in general.  Excluding those with disabilities (which I believe, in at least one version of this, were not going to be charged), why would you regularly drive your car into Midtown or LES?  Why do you even have a car in NYC?  I had one here for a year or two and then realized the only time it was less of a hassle to use than not was when I was leaving the city to go somewhere else.

People complain about the MTA, but come on, it's glorious being able to get around with no car.


Anyone traversing the outer boroughs will want a car. Had to go from Flushing to Bay Ridge the other evening for dinner and it took me every bit of 90 minutes to get there and another 90 mins to get home.

To go 20 god damned miles.
 
2022-08-11 6:59:42 PM  

Zeb Hesselgresser: Gov. Kathy Hochul is pushing ahead on a congestion pricing plan that would raise billions in revenue for public transit projects and promises to significantly decrease traffic into Manhattan's central business and tourism district


[media0.giphy.com image 290x200] [View Full Size image _x_]

Please proceed, Governor.  This is exactly the plan NYC needs right now.


i0.wp.comView Full Size


The point is, less of the first, more of the second and third.
 
2022-08-11 7:06:15 PM  

Arkanaut: Zeb Hesselgresser: Gov. Kathy Hochul is pushing ahead on a congestion pricing plan that would raise billions in revenue for public transit projects and promises to significantly decrease traffic into Manhattan's central business and tourism district


[media0.giphy.com image 290x200] [View Full Size image _x_]

Please proceed, Governor.  This is exactly the plan NYC needs right now.

[i0.wp.com image 776x592]

The point is, less of the first, more of the second and third.


Too many people popping their pants recently on the buses to really want to use them more. As for biking, sure, but it snows here half the year and it's been 95° for the last 60 days.

I'm not showing up to the office caked in my own sweat and dried rat poop dust. But, those of you that bike? More power to ya. Just don't get yeeted on a near daily basis as you're doing right now.
 
2022-08-11 8:57:12 PM  

Flushing It All Away: Too many people popping their pants recently on the buses to really want to use them more. As for biking, sure, but it snows here half the year and it's been 95° for the last 60 days.


Considering how many people poop their pants on the subway, that really shouldn't be such a deterrent to riding the bus. At least with the bus you know there'll be another stop in a block or two at the most, and you can open a window. But really the bus is not the issue, it's about getting people to take more space-efficient modes of transportation.

Also, when was the last time it "snowed half the year"? I'll tell ya when, it was winter of 2014 when it seemed like there was a major snowstorm every week. Since then there's maybe two snowstorms a year where the snow actually sticks on the ground overnight.
 
2022-08-11 9:13:25 PM  

Arkanaut: Flushing It All Away: Too many people popping their pants recently on the buses to really want to use them more. As for biking, sure, but it snows here half the year and it's been 95° for the last 60 days.

Considering how many people poop their pants on the subway, that really shouldn't be such a deterrent to riding the bus. At least with the bus you know there'll be another stop in a block or two at the most, and you can open a window. But really the bus is not the issue, it's about getting people to take more space-efficient modes of transportation.

Also, when was the last time it "snowed half the year"? I'll tell ya when, it was winter of 2014 when it seemed like there was a major snowstorm every week. Since then there's maybe two snowstorms a year where the snow actually sticks on the ground overnight.


I'm still not riding my bike when it's 42° out or 80°+.

You guys are sadists if you think that's salable to any significant portion of people or you just don't give a fark about what your coworkers have to smell all day.

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

A car has its advantages simply BECAUSE it doesn't put you in such a proximity to another where you know what they ate for breakfast.
 
2022-08-11 9:23:31 PM  

Flushing It All Away: Arkanaut: Flushing It All Away: Too many people popping their pants recently on the buses to really want to use them more. As for biking, sure, but it snows here half the year and it's been 95° for the last 60 days.

Considering how many people poop their pants on the subway, that really shouldn't be such a deterrent to riding the bus. At least with the bus you know there'll be another stop in a block or two at the most, and you can open a window. But really the bus is not the issue, it's about getting people to take more space-efficient modes of transportation.

Also, when was the last time it "snowed half the year"? I'll tell ya when, it was winter of 2014 when it seemed like there was a major snowstorm every week. Since then there's maybe two snowstorms a year where the snow actually sticks on the ground overnight.

I'm still not riding my bike when it's 42° out or 80°+.

You guys are sadists if you think that's salable to any significant portion of people or you just don't give a fark about what your coworkers have to smell all day.

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

A car has its advantages simply BECAUSE it doesn't put you in such a proximity to another where you know what they ate for breakfast.


Jesus Christ, just take the subway. Or the LIRR or whatever.
 
2022-08-11 9:27:07 PM  

Arkanaut: Flushing It All Away: Arkanaut: Flushing It All Away: Too many people popping their pants recently on the buses to really want to use them more. As for biking, sure, but it snows here half the year and it's been 95° for the last 60 days.

Considering how many people poop their pants on the subway, that really shouldn't be such a deterrent to riding the bus. At least with the bus you know there'll be another stop in a block or two at the most, and you can open a window. But really the bus is not the issue, it's about getting people to take more space-efficient modes of transportation.

Also, when was the last time it "snowed half the year"? I'll tell ya when, it was winter of 2014 when it seemed like there was a major snowstorm every week. Since then there's maybe two snowstorms a year where the snow actually sticks on the ground overnight.

I'm still not riding my bike when it's 42° out or 80°+.

You guys are sadists if you think that's salable to any significant portion of people or you just don't give a fark about what your coworkers have to smell all day.

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

A car has its advantages simply BECAUSE it doesn't put you in such a proximity to another where you know what they ate for breakfast.

Jesus Christ, just take the subway. Or the LIRR or whatever.


Or pay your extra $23 or whatever.
 
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