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(Phys Org2)   Paper on the human eye's perception of light absorption and reflection has some scientists feeling blue but others seeing red or left green with envy   (phys.org) divider line
    More: Interesting, Color, Mathematics, Hermann von Helmholtz, Color vision, Perception, 100-year-old understanding of color perception, current mathematical model, new study  
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469 clicks; posted to STEM » on 11 Aug 2022 at 6:05 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-08-11 8:50:22 AM  
I knew the colors seemed wrong all this time.
 
2022-08-11 8:52:46 AM  
Some things can't be mathematically calculated and perception is one
 
2022-08-11 9:01:33 AM  

cretinbob: Some things can't be mathematically calculated and perception is one

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One of the most common neural network algorithms called a "perceptron," (usually these days a "multilayer perceptron) I've written one.

They have calculated perception, and they realized that human's perceive more colors between red and yellow than the straight line on our current 3d color maps allow for.

As a graphic artist, I knew that a difference of 10% cyan is much more noticeable than a difference of 10% yellow
 
2022-08-11 9:08:05 AM  
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2022-08-11 9:15:10 AM  
I ate a quarter of mushrooms a few weeks ago and saw shapes and colors I didn't know were possible.
 
2022-08-11 9:35:45 AM  

brainlordmesomorph: cretinbob: Some things can't be mathematically calculated and perception is one
[external-content.duckduckgo.com image 400x243]
One of the most common neural network algorithms called a "perceptron," (usually these days a "multilayer perceptron) I've written one.

They have calculated perception, and they realized that human's perceive more colors between red and yellow than the straight line on our current 3d color maps allow for.

As a graphic artist, I knew that a difference of 10% cyan is much more noticeable than a difference of 10% yellow


Some people have none though. Hooray for your computer stuff, but the brain is a whole different processor.
 
2022-08-11 10:27:06 AM  
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2022-08-11 10:35:07 AM  
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2022-08-11 3:58:20 PM  

cretinbob: Some things can't be mathematically calculated and perception is one


I can see that
 
2022-08-11 4:58:08 PM  
I read the abstract and they are talking about color space, not actual human perception. I'll check jstor at some point to read the whole thing. It's not physiology though. It's still cool and something to read about.
 
2022-08-11 10:07:00 PM  

cretinbob: I read the abstract and they are talking about color space, not actual human perception. I'll check jstor at some point to read the whole thing. It's not physiology though. It's still cool and something to read about.


its about human perception and color space.

The standard color space model with its straight lines between the maximums of blue and red or red and yellow doesn't account for all the colors we can pickup between blue and red and red and yellow.

To actually account for the number of colors we can see, we have to make those straight lines longer and as a result curved to fit into the color space.

To put it another way, colorspace has a hyper-dimensional curve to it.
 
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