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(BBC-US)   Qantas about to discover most of their executives have a preexisting back condition   (bbc.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, high levels of winter flu, Virgin Media, ongoing tight labour market, operational performance, Covid spike, customers' expectations, baggage handling roles, managers  
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1499 clicks; posted to Business » on 08 Aug 2022 at 10:02 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



20 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-08-08 8:56:29 AM  
Hey, if they want to make millions on the backs of their workers...
 
2022-08-08 10:26:24 AM  
"Dave, if you don't back me up on this I'll make sure you keep that job permanently."
 
2022-08-08 10:32:41 AM  
Here's an idea.  Instead of paying C-Suite people $250K to load bags, just offer the job to young strong people at say half that.  You'll get plenty of applicants.
 
2022-08-08 10:40:59 AM  
They aught to cut their pay to match, they'll see how valuable that labor really is and start paying people accordingly. They'd get plenty of applicants if they were paying them what they deserve.

/No, I don't believe that either, they ain't fixing shiat.
 
2022-08-08 11:28:32 AM  

LeftisRightisWrong: They aught to cut their pay to match, they'll see how valuable that labor really is and start paying people accordingly. They'd get plenty of applicants if they were paying them what they deserve.

/No, I don't believe that either, they ain't fixing shiat.


They already have plenty of applicants.  They just aren't hiring anyone.

Qantas outsourced baggage ground handling in 2020, resulting in 1700 redundancies.

At the time, the airline said it could save $100 million a yearby shifting baggage handling, aircraft cleaning and ground support work to a third-party aviation service provider such as Dnata or Swissport at 11 airports.

https://www.smh.com.au/business/companies/aviation-sector-enlists-corporate-suits-to-handle-bags-amid-workers-shortage-20220808-p5b84y.html
 
2022-08-08 11:42:19 AM  
How many senior executives do they have? Maybe you should have done some trimming there if you want 100 to do baggage work.
 
2022-08-08 11:48:09 AM  

EvilEgg: Here's an idea.  Instead of paying C-Suite people $250K to load bags, just offer the job to young strong people at say half that.  You'll get plenty of applicants.


As a person who used to load and unload heavy shait by hand for a living and now works in proximity to C-Suite people at a global company, I have two comments:

1. $125K/year to move baggage is far too high. I'm all for paying people a living family wage, say $80K (which is a solid blue collar family wage here in the american midwest, adjust yours by location), but $125K that's like college educated data engineer money. And they are worth a little more to the economy a baggage handler.

2. I think you underestimate how much money C-Suite people make.
 
2022-08-08 11:55:12 AM  

EvilEgg: Here's an idea.  Instead of paying C-Suite people $250K to load bags, just offer the job to young strong people at say half that.  You'll get plenty of applicants.


you have to be young.  the point of it went right over your head.......
 
2022-08-08 11:56:40 AM  

Somaticasual: Hey, if they want to make millions on the backs of their workers...



those keyboard pushers and hand shakers will not last more than 2 or 3 days.

that kind of labor is foreign to them.  they will experience fatigue they've never experienced before.
 
2022-08-08 11:57:09 AM  

Brewster: How many senior executives do they have? Maybe you should have done some trimming there if you want 100 to do baggage work.


And if they can abandon [insert Bobs from Office Space] "whatever it is they DO there" to go toss baggage, how important is their middle managing?
 
2022-08-08 11:57:43 AM  

little red bot: EvilEgg: Here's an idea.  Instead of paying C-Suite people $250K to load bags, just offer the job to young strong people at say half that.  You'll get plenty of applicants.

As a person who used to load and unload heavy shait by hand for a living and now works in proximity to C-Suite people at a global company, I have two comments:

1. $125K/year to move baggage is far too high. I'm all for paying people a living family wage, say $80K (which is a solid blue collar family wage here in the american midwest, adjust yours by location), but $125K that's like college educated data engineer money. And they are worth a little more to the economy a baggage handler.

2. I think you underestimate how much money C-Suite people make.


There would be quite a dent in the economy with no baggage handlers or severely underpaid baggage handlers.  Stop this nonsense that engineers bring more value.
 
2022-08-08 11:58:07 AM  

little red bot: but $125K that's like college educated data engineer money


Did you consider maybe they are underpaid as well?
 
2022-08-08 12:02:50 PM  
I suspect it will go over about as well when the John Deere strike had the people in the office doing work on the line.
 
2022-08-08 12:21:05 PM  
I remember seeing this publicity stunt with other companies and I still think it is glue-sniffing level stupid.  First, you are taking employees that are likely making in the mid to high  6 figure range and throwing them at a job that likely pays less than a quarter of their current salary.  And since they likely haven't done this kind of work before, I'm going to guess they will suck at it.  So, you will pay employees four times as much to do a worse job, while their actually job responsibilities (which didn't just disappear because they left the office for a few weeks) get redistributed on the remaining execs to handle.

Seriously, if you are willing to overpay someone to do this job, why not overpay actual bag-handlers.  If you don't want long term obligations, hire them as contractors and throw stupid money at them.  You will get bites.  And it will still be cheaper, more effective, and more productive then paying your goddamn executives to do a job they will likely fail at for far more money.
 
2022-08-08 12:40:52 PM  

Chief Superintendent Lookout: little red bot: EvilEgg: Here's an idea.  Instead of paying C-Suite people $250K to load bags, just offer the job to young strong people at say half that.  You'll get plenty of applicants.

As a person who used to load and unload heavy shait by hand for a living and now works in proximity to C-Suite people at a global company, I have two comments:

1. $125K/year to move baggage is far too high. I'm all for paying people a living family wage, say $80K (which is a solid blue collar family wage here in the american midwest, adjust yours by location), but $125K that's like college educated data engineer money. And they are worth a little more to the economy a baggage handler.

2. I think you underestimate how much money C-Suite people make.

There would be quite a dent in the economy with no baggage handlers or severely underpaid baggage handlers.  Stop this nonsense that engineers bring more value.


To be fair,
Engineers design and set  in motion products that will make the company money.
The baggage handler has to be there, 24/7 purely as a part of company operations - In effect, a loss by necessity.

So you could definitely make the argument that an engineer brings more value the company (if only by default of not purely being a loss). But, it also doesn't negate the argument that the baggage handler has as much value as a human being as a engineer.
 
2022-08-08 1:13:04 PM  
UPS does this every year, even highly paid exec staff gets out to load and drive the trucks

understaffing is a biatch
 
2022-08-08 1:32:33 PM  

E.S.Q.: UPS does this every year, even highly paid exec staff gets out to load and drive the trucks

understaffing is a biatch


I can see UPS doing it in December (holidays). It's really flex-staffing, to keep things running as much as possible when you have your annual surge of business.

This thing with the airlines, though, is pure understaffing.
 
2022-08-08 2:01:04 PM  

Chief Superintendent Lookout: little red bot: EvilEgg: Here's an idea.  Instead of paying C-Suite people $250K to load bags, just offer the job to young strong people at say half that.  You'll get plenty of applicants.

As a person who used to load and unload heavy shait by hand for a living and now works in proximity to C-Suite people at a global company, I have two comments:

1. $125K/year to move baggage is far too high. I'm all for paying people a living family wage, say $80K (which is a solid blue collar family wage here in the american midwest, adjust yours by location), but $125K that's like college educated data engineer money. And they are worth a little more to the economy a baggage handler.

2. I think you underestimate how much money C-Suite people make.

There would be quite a dent in the economy with no baggage handlers or severely underpaid baggage handlers.  Stop this nonsense that engineers bring more value.


Automated baggage handling exists, it's just not hugely popular due to the weight. There are airlines who do it already.
 
2022-08-08 3:21:21 PM  
I work for a large hospital.  Over Covid they were asking, then telling, no clinical folks we need to help out on the patient floors.  Run labs from units to the lab, transportation (move patients around), bring food trays to units, help with housekeeping.

So I am an IT dude with 20+ years experience.  I was really glad to have a job during Covid and signed up to help when we were running COVID vaccine clinics, when they first came out.   The one thing I didnt see?   Anyone higher than a director working on the floors.  No VP's, No C-Suite folks.   I worked one shift and that was it.
 
2022-08-08 10:58:45 PM  

Somaticasual: There would be quite a dent in the economy with no baggage handlers or severely underpaid baggage handlers. Stop this nonsense that engineers bring more value.

To be fair,
Engineers design and set in motion products that will make the company money.
The baggage handler has to be there, 24/7 purely as a part of company operations - In effect, a loss by necessity.

So you could definitely make the argument that an engineer brings more value the company (if only by default of not purely being a loss). But, it also doesn't negate the argument that the baggage handler has as much value as a human being as a engineer.


All other things being equal (e.g. Assuming neither of them is a heroin dealer) of course a hypothetical baggage handler and a data engineer have the same value as human persons. Anyone who says otherwise is likely a terrible person.

And yes handling bags (or unloading irregulars at UPS as I did) is valuable to the economy which is why IMO anyone in that job deserves the dignity of being paid a family wage. But lugging suitcases all day (or transmissions, or whatever) is not as specialized and does not generate as much value, and has a far greater tolerance for sucking at the job than your average data engineer.

Of course data engineers are worth more to the economy per capita. In my experience you don't really start seeing people who are paid far more than what they actually contribute until you get into the realms of lazy/stupid managers or top executive who are paid for their reputation but actually make decisions just as well or would give as much confidence to investors as someone two pay grades below them.
 
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