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(Medium)   The Strange World of Antimatter - It's like ordinary matter, but entirely different. Also, it could kill us all   (antoniomelonio.medium.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Differential equation, Polynomial, math equations, good memories, people, school  
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841 clicks; posted to STEM » on 07 Aug 2022 at 4:24 PM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



23 Comments     (+0 »)
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2022-08-07 4:30:44 PM  
Now I'm (yawn) worried!
 
2022-08-07 4:44:22 PM  
A few years ago, I went to an icebreaker session for a bunch of chemists learning science communication.  We got handed a sheet with vague factoids about everyone's professional life, and we had to go talk to each other to find out who matched which factoid.  It went pretty well, except there was one clue we couldn't get: "This chemist works with antimatter."

Finally I went and asked the facilitator.  Turns out it was me.  I'm on a particle physics project trying to determine if the neutrino is its own antimatter twin.

/Building a detector to allow neutrinos to slam into it and then reconstruct what happened after the fact is a long, long way from "working with" them.
 
2022-08-07 5:00:06 PM  
Every few years, I have a PET scan. Positrons are antimatter, and so far they haven't killed me.
/although I tend to emit Gamma Rays for a few days, so there's that.
 
2022-08-07 5:01:15 PM  
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2022-08-07 5:30:26 PM  
I've always wondered how anti matter reacts on a macro level. Dies it form the same anti compounds. Does anti water flow through rocky stream beds of anti rocks made of anti carbon and anti iron or does it act very differently? Would a galaxy of pure anti matter look any different than a matter one if there was no regular matter to react with in the local space ?
 
2022-08-07 5:34:34 PM  
Black background and white text? fark that.
 
2022-08-07 5:39:06 PM  
If the anti-neutrons are really "unchanged" relative to ordinary neutrons,then why would the mass of said (anti-) neutrons anihilate itself--it should be just like ordinary neutron-neutron meetups.
 
2022-08-07 5:43:36 PM  

Macfine: I've always wondered how anti matter reacts on a macro level. Dies it form the same anti compounds. Does anti water flow through rocky stream beds of anti rocks made of anti carbon and anti iron or does it act very differently? Would a galaxy of pure anti matter look any different than a matter one if there was no regular matter to react with in the local space ?


There have been a few experiments with antimatter chemistry but they are rare. Antimatter is the single most expensive substance on earth ($62.5 trillion per gram) because it's super hard to make and it tends not to hang around very long. Anyway it seems to behave like regular matter chemically.
 
2022-08-07 5:50:35 PM  
Yes, antimatter can kill us all.

So can regular matter, but it's a whole lot cheaper and a whole lot more abundant.
 
2022-08-07 6:23:13 PM  

IgG4: Macfine: I've always wondered how anti matter reacts on a macro level. Dies it form the same anti compounds. Does anti water flow through rocky stream beds of anti rocks made of anti carbon and anti iron or does it act very differently? Would a galaxy of pure anti matter look any different than a matter one if there was no regular matter to react with in the local space ?

There have been a few experiments with antimatter chemistry but they are rare. Antimatter is the single most expensive substance on earth ($62.5 trillion per gram) because it's super hard to make and it tends not to hang around very long. Anyway it seems to behave like regular matter chemically.


Yeah I know it's obviously hard to find out here on earth under practical circumstances.. I've often looked for any indications if it may be the case. Interesting to hear something shows that might be true.
 
2022-08-07 6:42:43 PM  

Macfine: IgG4: Macfine: I've always wondered how anti matter reacts on a macro level. Dies it form the same anti compounds. Does anti water flow through rocky stream beds of anti rocks made of anti carbon and anti iron or does it act very differently? Would a galaxy of pure anti matter look any different than a matter one if there was no regular matter to react with in the local space ?

There have been a few experiments with antimatter chemistry but they are rare. Antimatter is the single most expensive substance on earth ($62.5 trillion per gram) because it's super hard to make and it tends not to hang around very long. Anyway it seems to behave like regular matter chemically.

Yeah I know it's obviously hard to find out here on earth under practical circumstances.. I've often looked for any indications if it may be the case. Interesting to hear something shows that might be true.


I believe they've made antihydrogen: an antiproton and a positron.  Or possibly two of them to make a chemically stable molecule.
 
2022-08-07 6:46:14 PM  

hegelsghost: If the anti-neutrons are really "unchanged" relative to ordinary neutrons,then why would the mass of said (anti-) neutrons anihilate itself--it should be just like ordinary neutron-neutron meetups.


Excellent question, and it may account for why the energy release isn't 100% of the mass.  Just a layman's guess.
 
2022-08-07 7:20:16 PM  

Macfine: I've always wondered how anti matter reacts on a macro level. Dies it form the same anti compounds. Does anti water flow through rocky stream beds of anti rocks made of anti carbon and anti iron or does it act very differently? Would a galaxy of pure anti matter look any different than a matter one if there was no regular matter to react with in the local space ?


They've managed to find antihydrogen, and experimentally it behaves exactly like hydrogen on the quantum level, so at the moment there's no reason to expect it would behave otherwise.
 
2022-08-07 7:35:42 PM  

hegelsghost: If the anti-neutrons are really "unchanged" relative to ordinary neutrons,then why would the mass of said (anti-) neutrons anihilate itself--it should be just like ordinary neutron-neutron meetups.


The difference is that they're made of oppositely charged quarks.  A regular neutron is made up of one up quark (+2/3e) and two down quarks (-1/3e each).  An antineutron would be one up antiquark (-2/3e) and two down antiquarks (+1/3e).  The up and anti-up annihilate each other.  The downs and anti-downs annihilate each other.
 
2022-08-07 8:33:09 PM  
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2022-08-07 8:36:30 PM  
Although they had the same value, one of the solutions was always negative.

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2022-08-07 9:16:27 PM  
What if we have it backwards and matter is actually anti-matter and anti-matter is matter?
 
2022-08-07 10:09:52 PM  

IgG4: Macfine: I've always wondered how anti matter reacts on a macro level. Dies it form the same anti compounds. Does anti water flow through rocky stream beds of anti rocks made of anti carbon and anti iron or does it act very differently? Would a galaxy of pure anti matter look any different than a matter one if there was no regular matter to react with in the local space ?

There have been a few experiments with antimatter chemistry but they are rare. Antimatter is the single most expensive substance on earth ($62.5 trillion per gram) because it's super hard to make and it tends not to hang around very long. Anyway it seems to behave like regular matter chemically.


My favorite fun fact was back in the 20th century they noticed that all the math implied that antimatter could just be matter traveling back in time (think I heard that before 2000).  Presumably they've done enough chemistry and other experiments since then to learn that entropy increases (i.e. not going backwards in time) even for antimatter.

The other thing is that we know it is extremely rare.  You'd easily see demarcation lines if there was an anti-matter galaxy.
 
2022-08-07 10:20:39 PM  

yet_another_wumpus: Presumably they've done enough chemistry and other experiments since then to learn that entropy increases (i.e. not going backwards in time) even for antimatter.


Thermodynamic time is identical for both matter and anti-matter, but anti-matter runs backwards in 'quantum' time.
 
2022-08-07 11:19:49 PM  
Nothing strange about it. It's simply a particle with a reverse charge. The antimatter version of the electron is the positron for example. Also, the Star Trek like mysterious power of matter/antimatter interactions is a load of nonsense. All a matter antimatter interaction produces is two high energy gamma rays; basically high energy light.
 
2022-08-08 3:31:40 AM  

Pointy Tail of Satan: Nothing strange about it. It's simply a particle with a reverse charge. The antimatter version of the electron is the positron for example. Also, the Star Trek like mysterious power of matter/antimatter interactions is a load of nonsense. All a matter antimatter interaction produces is two high energy gamma rays; basically high energy light.


"... and that's the shadow the school lab assistant left on the prep room wall..."
 
2022-08-08 5:09:58 AM  
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2022-08-08 8:27:24 AM  

Befuddled: What if we have it backwards and matter is actually anti-matter and anti-matter is matter?


That would explain why so many people goatee these days.

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