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(Space.com)   Last night on the debut of India's SSLV rocket the payload was put into a 356 km x 76 km elliptical orbit after a beautiful launch. Wasn't it supposed to put the payload in a 356 km circular orbit? Whoops   (space.com) divider line
    More: Sad, Satellite, Satish Dhawan Space Centre, specific problem, satellite payloads, Orbit, Astrodynamics, India's new rocket, Small Satellite Launch Vehicle  
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1028 clicks; posted to STEM » on 07 Aug 2022 at 4:12 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



31 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-08-07 3:40:46 PM  
76 km isn't nearly enough km.  You're gonna have a bad time.
 
2022-08-07 4:18:10 PM  
Space. Is. Hard.™
 
2022-08-07 4:18:28 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: 76 km isn't nearly enough km.  You're gonna have a bad time.


I think they realize that by now, hence the word 'unusable'
 
2022-08-07 4:20:49 PM  
There's a reason nobody wants to be the payload on a new rocket's first launch.  Making it to space and falling a few dozen meters per second short of staying there is better than average for a first flight, I think.
 
2022-08-07 4:23:36 PM  
47 miles!!! That's going to be a lot less very fast. Time to start "Where will it come down/" contest.
 
2022-08-07 4:25:25 PM  
At least it was a sensor issue and not a programming error as the headline seems to imply.
 
2022-08-07 4:32:53 PM  
There is going to be trouble when the payload hits the perigee.
 
2022-08-07 4:41:16 PM  

Professor Science: There's a reason nobody wants to be the payload on a new rocket's first launch.  Making it to space and falling a few dozen meters per second short of staying there is better than average for a first flight, I think.


That they got anything into orbit at all with a three stage solid propellant launch vehicle is pretty good.
 
2022-08-07 4:43:31 PM  

studebaker hoch: Professor Science: There's a reason nobody wants to be the payload on a new rocket's first launch.  Making it to space and falling a few dozen meters per second short of staying there is better than average for a first flight, I think.

That they got anything into orbit at all with a three stage solid propellant launch vehicle is pretty good.


Yeah, and it was the fourth stage, the only one liquid fueled one that failed.
 
2022-08-07 4:47:42 PM  
Mission control is still stuck on hold with product support. "Steve" will be with them shortly.
 
2022-08-07 4:48:49 PM  

zimbomba63: 47 miles!!! That's going to be a lot less very fast. Time to start "Where will it come down/" contest.


We're too late on the when.

That orbit was not stable, and the satellites have "already come down, and they are not usable," Somanath said.

I don't know if they've said where, so the betting might still be open on that.
 
2022-08-07 4:54:17 PM  

LimpDickRicky: Marcus Aurelius: 76 km isn't nearly enough km.  You're gonna have a bad time.

I think they realize that by now, hence the word 'unusable'


"Unusable" meaning "burnt to a crisp on re-entry"
 
2022-08-07 4:58:24 PM  

centrifugal bumblepuppy: Space. Is. Hard.™


Fortunately, the fix here will be rather easy. The new rocket will work.
 
2022-08-07 5:28:02 PM  
Hopefully they can just revert to VAB, add more boosters, and go for it again.
 
2022-08-07 6:14:26 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: 76 km isn't nearly enough km.  You're gonna have a bad time.


What a drag

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-08-07 6:17:50 PM  

freidog: Hopefully they can just revert to VAB, add more boosters, and go for it again.


That is a very cunning plan, Baldrick.
 
2022-08-07 6:50:18 PM  
So it didn't go in the designated orbit?
/Superpower by 2020!
 
2022-08-07 7:05:02 PM  
I've played a lot of Kerbal Space Program and I'm here to tell you this is a perfectly crumulant orbit. I don't know what all the fuss is about.
 
2022-08-07 7:05:12 PM  

englaja: So it didn't go in the designated orbit?
/Superpower by 2020!


India sent a probe to Mars for less than it costs the US to make a movie about Mars.
 
2022-08-07 7:11:06 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-08-07 7:40:47 PM  

Russ1642: Mission control is still stuck on hold with product support. "Steve" will be with them shortly.


Oh, this looks bad.  "Steve" has detected malware on their computer, and needs to remote in.
 
2022-08-07 7:44:45 PM  

Ivo Shandor: englaja: So it didn't go in the designated orbit?
/Superpower by 2020!

India sent a probe to Mars for less than it costs the US to make a movie about Mars.


France spends twice as much as India does on space.  Granted, the main EU rocket company is French, but still that's a lot of money and nowhere near India's performance in space.
 
2022-08-07 7:50:00 PM  

natazha: studebaker hoch: Professor Science: There's a reason nobody wants to be the payload on a new rocket's first launch.  Making it to space and falling a few dozen meters per second short of staying there is better than average for a first flight, I think.

That they got anything into orbit at all with a three stage solid propellant launch vehicle is pretty good.

Yeah, and it was the fourth stage, the only one liquid fueled one that failed.


Failed to do the needful.
 
2022-08-07 8:07:14 PM  
No matter, my friend.   Would you like a Slurpee with your Big Bite?
 
2022-08-07 8:52:58 PM  
Vishnu H. Krishna!
 
2022-08-07 9:07:07 PM  
Is it true they call the payload's orbit the "Vindaloop"?
 
2022-08-07 9:08:32 PM  

SBinRR: Is it true they call the payload's orbit the "Vindaloop"?


It did experience an intense burning sensation on the bottom of the orbit.
 
2022-08-07 10:29:46 PM  

Professor Science: There's a reason nobody wants to be the payload on a new rocket's first launch.  Making it to space and falling a few dozen meters per second short of staying there is better than average for a first flight, I think.


Yeah--it sounds like the circularization burn failed.

freidog: Hopefully they can just revert to VAB, add more boosters, and go for it again.


This doesn't appear to have been a problem with not enough boosters, but rather the final stage failed to complete it's burn.  KSP would be a lot more realistic if part of the research had to be done in flight.  When you unlock a new part it has a 10% chance of not working correctly.  Every flight on which it is actually successfully used increase this by 2%.  AFIAK there are random failure mods but I don't recall seeing any mods like this.
 
2022-08-08 8:09:34 AM  

Ivo Shandor: englaja: So it didn't go in the designated orbit?
/Superpower by 2020!

India sent a probe to Mars for less than it costs the US to make a movie about Mars.


Labor is a lot cheaper in India
 
2022-08-08 11:22:33 AM  
Not the first time the Indian space agency has put things into elliptical orbit.
 
2022-08-08 4:27:56 PM  

I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: natazha: studebaker hoch: Professor Science: There's a reason nobody wants to be the payload on a new rocket's first launch.  Making it to space and falling a few dozen meters per second short of staying there is better than average for a first flight, I think.

That they got anything into orbit at all with a three stage solid propellant launch vehicle is pretty good.

Yeah, and it was the fourth stage, the only one liquid fueled one that failed.

Failed to do the needful.


Don't worry, it's reverting back.
 
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