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(Big Think)   Transhumanism: Potential savior of humanity or just utter nonsense?   (bigthink.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Brain, Human brain, Transhumanism, Stem cell, Emergence, Neuron, Harry Potter, computing power  
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644 clicks; posted to STEM » on 27 Jul 2022 at 2:43 PM (18 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-07-27 2:06:21 PM  
But transhumanism proponents often go far beyond these breakthroughs. Many in the movement suggest that a "singularity" is the inescapable outcome of exponential technological progress. In such a future, they claim, it would be possible for humans to upload their minds to a computer and live forever in the digital realm. Some are signing up now to be frozen until such a time arrives that they can be revived.

I thought singularity referred to the point in the future beyond which prediction becomes impossible or unimaginable.
 
2022-07-27 2:07:16 PM  
Look all I know is, some of those NPCs in Cyberpunk 2077 were really hot.
 
2022-07-27 2:09:53 PM  

JessieL: But transhumanism proponents often go far beyond these breakthroughs. Many in the movement suggest that a "singularity" is the inescapable outcome of exponential technological progress. In such a future, they claim, it would be possible for humans to upload their minds to a computer and live forever in the digital realm. Some are signing up now to be frozen until such a time arrives that they can be revived.

I thought singularity referred to the point in the future beyond which prediction becomes impossible or unimaginable.


In this case, it menas "I don't know how any of this works, but I have lots of money, so I must be doing it right"
 
2022-07-27 2:14:19 PM  
The philosophy that, ah...very sensible people like Mark Zuckerberg and Elon Musk espoused?

Fark user imageView Full Size

Fark user imageView Full Size


I don't know if they transcended humanity, but they certainly hit the Uncanny Valley.
 
2022-07-27 2:19:40 PM  
FTFA: Some are signing up now to be frozen until such a time arrives that they can be revived.

The problem with this is that it assumes that in the future they will have such a severe shortage of rich, selfish, gullible assholes that they'll need to revive ours. I suppose they might revive them if only to sell them another scam.

In fact, it seems like there is a great business model here somewhere: "Give me a ton of money right now, and we'll revive you in 500 years. Pinky swear". Or maybe a TV series on Prime about a con man running a fake cryogenics facility.
 
2022-07-27 2:24:47 PM  

HugeMistake: FTFA: Some are signing up now to be frozen until such a time arrives that they can be revived.

The problem with this is that it assumes that in the future they will have such a severe shortage of rich, selfish, gullible assholes that they'll need to revive ours. I suppose they might revive them if only to sell them another scam.

In fact, it seems like there is a great business model here somewhere: "Give me a ton of money right now, and we'll revive you in 500 years. Pinky swear". Or maybe a TV series on Prime about a con man running a fake cryogenics facility.


m0vie.files.wordpress.comView Full Size


Well, hell - sign me up, Hoss!
 
2022-07-27 2:26:24 PM  

HugeMistake: FTFA: Some are signing up now to be frozen until such a time arrives that they can be revived.

The problem with this is that it assumes that in the future they will have such a severe shortage of rich, selfish, gullible assholes that they'll need to revive ours. I suppose they might revive them if only to sell them another scam.

In fact, it seems like there is a great business model here somewhere: "Give me a ton of money right now, and we'll revive you in 500 years. Pinky swear". Or maybe a TV series on Prime about a con man running a fake cryogenics facility.


encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.comView Full Size

Would like to know more...
 
2022-07-27 2:29:11 PM  
There's simulating mind, then there's emulating a mind. I suspect the latter might not be impossible.

Fark user imageView Full Size


(That said, I tend to think the bigger problem is that there isn't really a way "download" a brain. Brains are not hard drives, there's no such thing as doing a sector-by-sector readout over the main bus, and even destructive mapping schemes would destroy the neuron states before information could be gleaned about them. Most of the solutions I see involve waving your hands and invoking nanotechnology in a way that might as well be invoking magic.

But hey, figure that out, and I'm game.)
 
2022-07-27 2:29:45 PM  
TFA basically says: "Just give up on it because things some people say may not be true."

Ok.... So lets give up on vaccines, seatbelts, cooked food, etc as well.


Here I'll write like the author of this article.

"The act of cooking food, does not in fact, kill germs. Therefore you cannot say that cooking food makes it safer to eat. While we know that heat can kill viruses, you or I have never watched live as Salmonella was killed by the heat of cooking. This means that we cannot possibly be certain that the act of cooking kills the virus and we shouldn't cook food at all as a result. Instead we should just focus on foods that do not require cooking to avoid any troubling thoughts or concerns about the future."


Utter gibberish and nonsense monetized.... I should have been a literature major.
 
2022-07-27 2:30:05 PM  
quickmeme.comView Full Size
 
2022-07-27 2:35:35 PM  

Martian_Astronomer: There's simulating mind, then there's emulating a mind. I suspect the latter might not be impossible.

[Fark user image 684x1174]

(That said, I tend to think the bigger problem is that there isn't really a way "download" a brain. Brains are not hard drives, there's no such thing as doing a sector-by-sector readout over the main bus, and even destructive mapping schemes would destroy the neuron states before information could be gleaned about them. Most of the solutions I see involve waving your hands and invoking nanotechnology in a way that might as well be invoking magic.

But hey, figure that out, and I'm game.)



Responding to the bolded bit:
While we can't download the brain (currently) we can scan it down to the electron (MRI)
Assuming you can freeze a person between seconds (or, more realistically, bring them down to absolute zero without killing them) you could take a scan of that brain, atom by atom, and recreate it digitally. It would be a 'simple' matter of software to continue running the processes in that brain once we understand it better.

The 'data' stored in our brain isn't ethereal. It is still saved in the chemical and atomic makeup of the brain. It isn't a huge leap in tech to assume you will one day be able to back up brain states or transfer to a new body with similar configuration.... Yes its probably centuries off, but it is potentially doable with mostly modern day physics and computer science.
 
2022-07-27 2:41:24 PM  

brax33: Martian_Astronomer: There's simulating mind, then there's emulating a mind. I suspect the latter might not be impossible.

[Fark user image 684x1174]

(That said, I tend to think the bigger problem is that there isn't really a way "download" a brain. Brains are not hard drives, there's no such thing as doing a sector-by-sector readout over the main bus, and even destructive mapping schemes would destroy the neuron states before information could be gleaned about them. Most of the solutions I see involve waving your hands and invoking nanotechnology in a way that might as well be invoking magic.

But hey, figure that out, and I'm game.)


Responding to the bolded bit:
While we can't download the brain (currently) we can scan it down to the electron (MRI)
Assuming you can freeze a person between seconds (or, more realistically, bring them down to absolute zero without killing them) you could take a scan of that brain, atom by atom, and recreate it digitally. It would be a 'simple' matter of software to continue running the processes in that brain once we understand it better.

The 'data' stored in our brain isn't ethereal. It is still saved in the chemical and atomic makeup of the brain. It isn't a huge leap in tech to assume you will one day be able to back up brain states or transfer to a new body with similar configuration.... Yes its probably centuries off, but it is potentially doable with mostly modern day physics and computer science.


So which cryogenics company did you end up going with?
 
2022-07-27 2:49:45 PM  

brax33: While we can't download the brain (currently) we can scan it down to the electron (MRI)


I'm going to need a citation about MRI achieving that level of resolution, because nothing I'm seeing says that it comes anywhere close.

brax33: Assuming you can freeze a person between seconds (or, more realistically, bring them down to absolute zero without killing them)


Also, if I could convert all of my skin cells to stainless steel without dying or becoming immobile, I would be a pretty badass superhero.

What you're describing is the central dilemma: How can you flash-freeze a brain in a way that does not destroy neuron states? And because the brain is a big mass and you can't cool the interior as quickly as the exterior, it's not a problem that you can just wave away.
 
2022-07-27 2:50:43 PM  

brax33: Martian_Astronomer: There's simulating mind, then there's emulating a mind. I suspect the latter might not be impossible.

[Fark user image 684x1174]

(That said, I tend to think the bigger problem is that there isn't really a way "download" a brain. Brains are not hard drives, there's no such thing as doing a sector-by-sector readout over the main bus, and even destructive mapping schemes would destroy the neuron states before information could be gleaned about them. Most of the solutions I see involve waving your hands and invoking nanotechnology in a way that might as well be invoking magic.

But hey, figure that out, and I'm game.)


Responding to the bolded bit:
While we can't download the brain (currently) we can scan it down to the electron (MRI)
Assuming you can freeze a person between seconds (or, more realistically, bring them down to absolute zero without killing them) you could take a scan of that brain, atom by atom, and recreate it digitally. It would be a 'simple' matter of software to continue running the processes in that brain once we understand it better.

The 'data' stored in our brain isn't ethereal. It is still saved in the chemical and atomic makeup of the brain. It isn't a huge leap in tech to assume you will one day be able to back up brain states or transfer to a new body with similar configuration.... Yes its probably centuries off, but it is potentially doable with mostly modern day physics and computer science.


One, you have a very confused idea of what MRI is. Even with very strong magnetic fields, you can't get much below 100 micrometers with people. Maybe down to micrometer scale with some animals. Not remotely close to an atom-by-atom map of the brain.

Two, bringing a person down to ultralow temperature would not stop brain activity, and you still need a coherent snapshot (moment in time so to speak), which would have to be impossibly fast. So not feasible, certainly not with MRI or any other known technology.

And even if you could get a moment-in-time snapshot, it still wouldn't be a coherent state because the brain is not a computer that is synchronized to a shared clock. It's a bunch of asynchronous analog processes running each at their own rate. So not only do you need the instantaneous state, you need the rate of change, e.g. what chemicals were flowing in which direction at which speed. A snapshot of states won't tell you that. And to get that you need to let the process continue for some amount of time... and there goes your coherent state again.

So yes, it is a huge leap in tech and massive assumption that we will at some point be able to "back up brain states". Furthermore there may well be fundamental limits on the precision with which it can be done (compare trying to measure pressure and temperature precisely, for an analogy).

At the risk of sounding rude, you should really understand a lot better what is being proposed and what it would take before sounding off so confidently about what might or might not be possible with future, let alone contemporary, physics and computer science.
 
2022-07-27 2:51:29 PM  
I think Arthur C Clark got it right, where the parts of us that are organic would gradually be replaced bit by bit, neuron by neuron, with advanced technologies that perform better and are less susceptible to decay. Otherwise, at best, you're just making a copy of yourself (and I wouldn't wish myself on anyone, like that) and, at worse, destroying the original.
 
2022-07-27 2:51:35 PM  
Even after they have left human flesh and death behind, the wealthy probably still be the same sociopaths farking everyone else over.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-07-27 2:51:39 PM  
Put the weed down for a while, Subby.
 
2022-07-27 2:53:52 PM  

Samfucious: I think Arthur C Clark got it right, where the parts of us that are organic would gradually be replaced bit by bit, neuron by neuron, with advanced technologies that perform better and are less susceptible to decay. Otherwise, at best, you're just making a copy of yourself (and I wouldn't wish myself on anyone, like that) and, at worse, destroying the original.


Clarke*
 
2022-07-27 3:00:03 PM  

Samfucious: I think Arthur C Clark got it right, where the parts of us that are organic would gradually be replaced bit by bit, neuron by neuron, with advanced technologies that perform better and are less susceptible to decay. Otherwise, at best, you're just making a copy of yourself (and I wouldn't wish myself on anyone, like that) and, at worse, destroying the original.


I agree. Doing a Ship of Theseus style upgrade of organic bits with electronic replacements will be the only way to really transcend human flesh without the original version still experiencing death.

You add solid state hardware to replace a damaged or failing part of the brain, and the hardware gets integrated into the "self", then you rinse and repeat until it is 100% replaced.

There might still be some personality shifts as the organic bits are lost if the replication of the organic brain isn't 100%, though. Like you'd need to replicate not just how data is processed in the brain, but also how emotions are regulated by chemicals in the brain.
 
2022-07-27 3:01:21 PM  
You can have my hippocampus when you pry it out of my cold dead brain pan.
 
2022-07-27 3:02:47 PM  

JessieL: I thought singularity referred to the point in the future beyond which prediction becomes impossible or unimaginable.


It is. The most common version of it, however, refers to AI getting sufficiently advanced that tech starts advancing both on its own and at previously impossible speeds - in other words, the goal is to CREATE that point and then see massive changes in a matter of a few years. This could potentially unlock all sorts of things. It's also something you have to be very, very, careful with. Terminators and the like are unlikely to happen, and multiple kill switches can ensure they're quickly shut down if they do, but a bugged AI working on tech could result in all sorts of bizarre futures... so you definitely don't want completely full auto, and WHO develops the thing is critical. I shudder to think about the Facebook Singularity or the Chinese Government singularity.
 
2022-07-27 3:05:48 PM  
Bob Geldof - Ending Death
Youtube 0PczI-KnIjI
 
2022-07-27 3:12:56 PM  
Transhumanism is less a religion or even a philosophy than a general outlook on life. However, it has been the basis of a great many religions, philosophies, and ideologies, at least during the late Information, Interplanetary, and early Federation periods. Transhumanism is the view that humans can and should strive to become more than they currently are, using technological means.
 
2022-07-27 3:19:32 PM  
Is a Technological Singularity Inevitable?
Youtube px9RyIKixHo

Cyborgs, Androids, Transhumanism & AI - YouTube
 
2022-07-27 3:27:00 PM  

JessieL: I thought singularity referred to the point in the future beyond which prediction becomes impossible or unimaginable.


The Singularity is the point at which single computing resources attain the capacity of the human brain.

Depending on the level of woo-woo, this is somewhere on the spectrum between the point at which the computing capacity in a 1:1 brain volume occurs, and the point at which an indistinguishable human simulation occurs in that computing capacity.

/I still don't know why anyone wants to simulate a human intelligence.
//Human intelligences are a dime a dozen, most of them kinda suck at it, and their priorities are sex and conquest
///Better to spend resources on non-human intelligences whose priorities are to do things for us
 
2022-07-27 3:45:58 PM  

Martian_Astronomer: There's simulating mind, then there's emulating a mind. I suspect the latter might not be impossible.

[Fark user image image 684x1174]

(That said, I tend to think the bigger problem is that there isn't really a way "download" a brain. Brains are not hard drives, there's no such thing as doing a sector-by-sector readout over the main bus, and even destructive mapping schemes would destroy the neuron states before information could be gleaned about them. Most of the solutions I see involve waving your hands and invoking nanotechnology in a way that might as well be invoking magic.

But hey, figure that out, and I'm game.)


I saw a great quote last week that

"if you think technology will solve your problems you do not understand technology, and you do not understand your problems".

Transhumanism is something like that

/ that said when someone starts splicing traits like superior hemoglobin or radiation resistance into kids we will have something new to deal with.
 
2022-07-27 3:56:45 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


"There is no truth in flesh, only betrayal. There is no strength in flesh, only weakness. There is no constancy in flesh, only decay. There is no certainty in flesh but death."

\Credo Omnissiah
 
2022-07-27 3:56:57 PM  

Mad_Radhu: Samfucious: I think Arthur C Clark got it right, where the parts of us that are organic would gradually be replaced bit by bit, neuron by neuron, with advanced technologies that perform better and are less susceptible to decay. Otherwise, at best, you're just making a copy of yourself (and I wouldn't wish myself on anyone, like that) and, at worse, destroying the original.

I agree. Doing a Ship of Theseus style upgrade of organic bits with electronic replacements will be the only way to really transcend human flesh without the original version still experiencing death.

You add solid state hardware to replace a damaged or failing part of the brain, and the hardware gets integrated into the "self", then you rinse and repeat until it is 100% replaced.

There might still be some personality shifts as the organic bits are lost if the replication of the organic brain isn't 100%, though. Like you'd need to replicate not just how data is processed in the brain, but also how emotions are regulated by chemicals in the brain.


Maybe that's the only way to transcend flesh, but it's not necessarily the only way to transcend death. A Ship of Theseus for the brain could also be accomplished organically by tricking neurons into accepting stem-cell-derived replacements for their new neighbors at a replacement rate slow enough that the brain has a chance to continuously re-route its interaction pathways. That also involves currently non-existent tech, but it gets around the "death" problem that artificial-tech neuron replacements themselves could possibly present.
 
2022-07-27 3:59:10 PM  

Martian_Astronomer: brax33: While we can't download the brain (currently) we can scan it down to the electron (MRI)

I'm going to need a citation about MRI achieving that level of resolution, because nothing I'm seeing says that it comes anywhere close.

brax33: Assuming you can freeze a person between seconds (or, more realistically, bring them down to absolute zero without killing them)

Also, if I could convert all of my skin cells to stainless steel without dying or becoming immobile, I would be a pretty badass superhero.

What you're describing is the central dilemma: How can you flash-freeze a brain in a way that does not destroy neuron states? And because the brain is a big mass and you can't cool the interior as quickly as the exterior, it's not a problem that you can just wave away.


Even if you can instantly freeze the entire brain's mass all at once, there's that little problem of water expanding when it freezes, so that gets us back to the destroy neuron states, not to mention the neurons themselves.

Once they figure out a way to freeze water without affecting it's volume, they might be on to something.  I'm not holding my breath.
 
2022-07-27 3:59:57 PM  
The reality is computers are great at math calculations and data recall, while human brains excel at creativity - putting things we know together in new ways. It doesn't look like we're anywhere near inventing a truly creative AI. Or building a device that can hold a transfer of our psyche that way.

The best we may hope for is an AI that fakes creativity because it calculates things so quickly that it simply brute forces its way through all the possible combinations. While that may actually be a better approach to innovation it's not the same.

What that means is that for the foreseeable future transhumanism is going to involve adding to our bodies. That's nothing new. We've been varying levels of cyborg ever since we picked up our first stick or rock and used it as a tool.

Here's the thing though. We are on the cusp of creating mind/machine interfaces and we only have the dimmest idea what the consequences will be when a creative human brain is linked to the calculation and recall capabilities of a computer.

What does a world look like when any human can recall in perfect detail anything and everything the entire human race knows? How fast would such a world change?

I won't speak for anyone else, but when I talk about the singularity that's the moment I'm talking about.

The history of the species is one of exponentially increasing comprehension of and ability to manipulate the universe thanks to being able to store information better than any other species we know of through data storage and transfer tools. It started with language, got faster with writing, exploded with the printing press, has hit ludicrous speed with computing, and is going to go plaid with a mind/machine interface.

Data storage and transfer lets us know what a human thousands of years ago was thinking, or what a human on the other side of the planet thinks. Our systems for storing and sharing data have become ever more efficient and we can now see the moment where we will have perfect instantaneous recall of everything we know.

That's both exhilarating and terrifying.
 
2022-07-27 4:05:05 PM  
Creativity is fairly easy, especially if you look at artistic progress from purely representational art to abstract art; it's a matter of following some rules while breaking others. It's not magic.
 
2022-07-27 4:12:01 PM  
Which is to say what singularitarianism is, magical thinking for people who don't believe in bullshiat like the Rapture and who should know better.
 
2022-07-27 4:29:00 PM  
Human progress and human evolution requires death. I'm all for medical advances that extend lifespan and limit suffering, but any ideology that seeks to end death is a bad one.
 
2022-07-27 4:35:49 PM  
"science in the future will be capable of thing it's not capable today"
"LOL, magical thinking"
 
2022-07-27 4:50:09 PM  
Transhumanism sounds like a potentially beneficial idea.

But good luck finding a public bathroom in Florida.
 
2022-07-27 4:51:19 PM  
We're not gonna be uploading our minds to the cloud or whatever. Besides, even if it were possible, would you trust the likely-underpaid technician doing to not play "whoops wrong button" and eliminate the consciousness of some despised rich asshat?

"Whoops, I deleted Jeff Bezos. Oh well, there'll be another rich prick to replace him soon enough!"
 
2022-07-27 5:03:42 PM  

LewDux: "science in the future will be capable of thing it's not capable today"
"LOL, magical thinking"


Hardly.  It's more that that's the very nature of technological progress.  The only way this *doesn't* come to pass is if the majority of human knowledge is destroyed and the capability of the human species to sustain a cooperative society that explores science is ended permanently.
 
2022-07-27 5:10:44 PM  
codepunk.ioView Full Size


Accept no substitutes. Be a HAPPY Transhuman, folks.
 
2022-07-27 5:23:49 PM  
Of course there is no you to take a snapshot of and upload forever. Your self of today isn't the self it was yesterday, and won't be tomorrow.

The universe is the substrate that we execute our lives upon and the universe itself is a constant churn of relativistic interactions. We are a consequence of causality, and without change over time we do not exist.

Crafting a new self using non-biological parts is a perfectly reasonable way forward with a different foundation built on the same substrate. What you consider a continuation of yourself, however, you will have to decide.
 
2022-07-27 5:25:25 PM  
Make me a robot for all I care, as long as I can enjoy steak and bjs. That's where I draw the line.
 
2022-07-27 5:28:41 PM  

brax33: Martian_Astronomer: There's simulating mind, then there's emulating a mind. I suspect the latter might not be impossible.

[Fark user image 684x1174]

(That said, I tend to think the bigger problem is that there isn't really a way "download" a brain. Brains are not hard drives, there's no such thing as doing a sector-by-sector readout over the main bus, and even destructive mapping schemes would destroy the neuron states before information could be gleaned about them. Most of the solutions I see involve waving your hands and invoking nanotechnology in a way that might as well be invoking magic.

But hey, figure that out, and I'm game.)


Responding to the bolded bit:
While we can't download the brain (currently) we can scan it down to the electron (MRI)
Assuming you can freeze a person between seconds (or, more realistically, bring them down to absolute zero without killing them) you could take a scan of that brain, atom by atom, and recreate it digitally. It would be a 'simple' matter of software to continue running the processes in that brain once we understand it better.

The 'data' stored in our brain isn't ethereal. It is still saved in the chemical and atomic makeup of the brain. It isn't a huge leap in tech to assume you will one day be able to back up brain states or transfer to a new body with similar configuration.... Yes its probably centuries off, but it is potentially doable with mostly modern day physics and computer science.


The data in the brain may be ethereal.  It is still unknown where consciousness derives from.
 
2022-07-27 5:40:47 PM  
For most of human history, asking if going to the moon was possible was easy to answer: no.
Transhumanism may not be inherently impossible, but I doubt it we be accomplished for another century or two, if not longer.

Everyone saying that uploading human consciousness into a robot/computer is "just around the corner" is saying it from the engineering/tech-bro side, and they're known for making a lot of marketing-related promises and drinking their own kool-aid.

From the Neuroscience/Understanding-how-the-Human-brain-works side, they're saying "What? No! Are you nuts? There's no farking way this is happening within your lifetime or your kids. Grandkids are a very thin maybe."

The Human Brain is most complicated piece of matter in the known universe. The Human brain itself does not know how it works. Actual Neuroscientists scoff at analogies comparing it to a computer. A better analogy is that that the brain works like an ecosystem.

We have a looooong farking way to go before we're uploading consciousness from a human brain into anything. Colonizing Mars is less of a pipe dream.

I mean, we did eventually make it to the moon, so I won't call it "impossible". But there are a lot more hurdles in the way than you might think.
 
2022-07-27 5:54:50 PM  
 
2022-07-27 6:01:22 PM  
Is it just me or does Musk look like a giant cockroach wearing a badly fitting human suit?
Fark user imageView Full Size


Zuckerberg just looks like the robot boy who desperately wants to be human.
 
2022-07-27 6:13:02 PM  
Before y'all try to transcend your humanity, maybe you should first work on trying to achieve it?
 
2022-07-27 6:49:47 PM  
girlgeniusonline.comView Full Size
 
2022-07-27 6:56:40 PM  
Probably no current human can be transhuman.   But if we infect the fetus with nano machines so that the machine interface is one and the same while growing, it might be possible.  If on machine neuron can read and influence the local meat neurons, and communicate the states to a outside computer, then why not upload a mind?  Or what if the meat is replaced ship of theaseus style?  Is a person who has lost a part of their mind to brain damage not the same person?  And if that part had its functionality replaced with a machine?

We need the government to issue hard and fast rules on what percentage of meat or what meat parts a person can have replaced and still have personhood.
 
2022-07-27 6:59:02 PM  

Mouser: Before y'all try to transcend your humanity, maybe you should first work on trying to achieve it?


We need the government to define human.  Is a human just particular meat?  Or does that meat also have to have particular thoughts and ideas?
 
2022-07-27 7:34:34 PM  
In my experience people who call themselves transhumanists are super-enthusiastic about technology but don't really know much about it.  It's become more or less another religion where the afterlife is replaced by a better life through effectively supernatural technology.

Some of their basic points make sense, which is how they drag you in, of course.
 
2022-07-27 8:14:33 PM  

JessieL: But transhumanism proponents often go far beyond these breakthroughs. Many in the movement suggest that a "singularity" is the inescapable outcome of exponential technological progress. In such a future, they claim, it would be possible for humans to upload their minds to a computer and live forever in the digital realm. Some are signing up now to be frozen until such a time arrives that they can be revived.

I thought singularity referred to the point in the future beyond which prediction becomes impossible or unimaginable.


In theory, yes.

In the weird science-adjacent pseudoreligion that futurism has now become, the singularity is a high tech utopia where AI, cybernetics, genetic engineering and life extension technology have solved all of the world's social and political problems. Without generating any new ones.
 
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