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(The Verge)   How busy have the launch control folks at SpaceX been this year? The just broke their annual launch record. Fark: In July   (theverge.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, International Space Station, Rocket, orbital launches, company's own record, NASA safety, launch cadence, SpaceX, Falcon 1  
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193 clicks; posted to STEM » on 23 Jul 2022 at 3:26 PM (9 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



25 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-07-23 3:32:35 PM  
The view of the latest launch from my driveway, 100 miles away.
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-07-23 4:00:49 PM  
Just think how well they'll do when they can make a re-usable rocket (which the CEO of ULA knows is impossible and even if SpaceX did make one, they'd never make a profit on it).

/s

IIRC SpaceX has made more orbital launches this year than all other sources combined.
 
2022-07-23 4:05:02 PM  
Oh dear

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-07-23 4:20:54 PM  
In other news.....I don't know who they have writing for inverse.com but they should wait for their coffee to kick in before submitting their stories.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-07-23 5:14:10 PM  
Well, somebody has to punch holes in the ozone!
 
2022-07-23 5:23:01 PM  
At their current launch cadence (one mission every 6.4 days), SpaceX is on track to reach 57 or 58 launches this year - More if they get in one or two Starship / Super Heavy test flights.  To put that in perspective, anything over 50 launches this year is more flights than SpaceX totalled for years 2006 through 2017 inclusive.

They currently have a total of 66 missions on the manifest for this year.  It's a given that several of these will slip till next year or later, but to compensate, SpaceX doesn't tend to list Starlink flights on the manifest until they get close to the launch date.  So any slippage will likely be taken up by Starlink flights.

The limiting factors are most likely pad (and launch window) availability, time needed to recycle boosters, availability of new second stages, and ground crew turnaround.

The landing barges are probably getting pretty dizzy at this point, too.
 
2022-07-23 6:06:27 PM  

natazha: Just think how well they'll do when they can make a re-usable rocket (which the CEO of ULA knows is impossible and even if SpaceX did make one, they'd never make a profit on it).


I wonder if the ULA still considers SpaceX an "ankle biter".
 
2022-07-23 6:19:33 PM  
My next launch will break my annuals record.
 
2022-07-23 8:32:26 PM  
Well yeah.  Orbiting 4000 pieces of space garbage takes a lot of launches.
 
DVD
2022-07-23 8:45:44 PM  

studebaker hoch: natazha: Just think how well they'll do when they can make a re-usable rocket (which the CEO of ULA knows is impossible and even if SpaceX did make one, they'd never make a profit on it).

I wonder if the ULA still considers SpaceX an "ankle biter".


____________________________________

"Chasing after the crumbs of rocket experts that have a long-established record in the field." - Some space expert that KNOWS that rocket landings are impossible.
 
2022-07-23 10:13:18 PM  
One key factor that allows for such a busy launch schedule is that, in a majority of SpaceX's launches this year, SpaceX is serving as its own customer. The company is using these launches to flesh out its massive internet-from-space Starlink constellation, lofting batches of up to 53 satellites at a time (though the numbers vary from launch to launch). Today's flight out of Vandenberg Space Force Base in California put up an additional 46 Starlink satellites.

So they're not doing anything useful?
 
2022-07-23 11:28:28 PM  

iron de havilland: One key factor that allows for such a busy launch schedule is that, in a majority of SpaceX's launches this year, SpaceX is serving as its own customer. The company is using these launches to flesh out its massive internet-from-space Starlink constellation, lofting batches of up to 53 satellites at a time (though the numbers vary from launch to launch). Today's flight out of Vandenberg Space Force Base in California put up an additional 46 Starlink satellites.

So they're not doing anything useful?


Here's what SpaceX has launched so far this year.  Granted there's a lot of Starlink in there, but look at the rest (13 missions) and decide if any of these qualify as useful -

2022:
1     01/06/2022    Falcon 9 - Starlink 34          B1062.4
2     01/13/2022    Falcon 9 - Transporter-3     B1058.10
3     01/18/2022    Falcon 9 - Starlink 35          B1060.10
4     01/31/2022    Falcon 9 - CSG-2                B1052.3
5     02/02/2022    Falcon 9 - NROL-87            B1071.1
6     02/03/2022    Falcon 9 - Starlink 36          B1061.6
7     02/21/2022    Falcon 9 - Starlink 37          B1058.11
8     02/25/2022    Falcon 9 - Starlink 38          B1063.4
9     03/03/2022    Falcon 9 - Starlink 39          B1060.11
10   03/09/2022    Falcon 9 - Starlink 40          B1052.4
11   03/19/2022    Falcon 9 - Starlink 41          B1051.12
12   04/01/2022    Falcon 9 -Transporter 4      B1061.7
13   04/08/2022    Falcon 9 - Ax-1 (Crewed; first fully private mission to the ISS) B1062.5
14   04/17/2022    Falcon 9 - NROL-85            B1071.2
15   04/21/2022    Falcon 9 - Starlink 42          B1060.12
16   04/27/2022    Falcon 9 - CREW 4.            B1067.4
17   04/29/2022    Falcon 9 - Starlink 43         B1062.6
18   05/06/2022    Falcon 9 - Starlink 44         B1058.12
19   05/13/2022    Falcon 9 - Starlink 45         B1063.5
20   05/14/2022    Falcon 9 - Starlink 46         B1073.1
21   05/18/2022    Falcon 9 - Starlink 47         B1052.5
22   05/25/2022    Falcon 9 -Transporter 5      B1061.8
23   06/08/2022    Falcon 9 - Nilesat 301        B1049.11
24   06/17/2022    Falcon 9 - Starlink 48         B1060.13
25   06/18/2022    Falcon 9 - SARah 1            B1071.3
26   06/19/2022    Falcon 9 - Globalstar-2       B1061.9
27   06/29/2022    Falcon 9 - SES-22              B1073.2
28   07/07/2022    Falcon 9 - Starlink 49          B1058.13
29   07/11/2022    Falcon 9 - Starlink 50          B1063.6
30   07/15/2022    Falcon 9 - CRS 25              B1067.5
31   07/17/2022    Falcon 9 - Starlink 51          B1051.13
32   07/22/2022    Falcon 9 - Starlink 52          B1071.4
 
2022-07-23 11:38:15 PM  
That works out to 40.625% of their launches so far this year are for outside customers.
 
2022-07-23 11:39:57 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Here's what SpaceX has launched so far this year.  Granted there's a lot of Starlink in there, but look at the rest (13 missions) and decide if any of these qualify as useful -


Thank you for your facts.

/But I'm pretty sure JWST launched on an Ariane.
//And dirtying up the sky for amateur astronomers is whack.
 
2022-07-23 11:46:26 PM  

iron de havilland: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Here's what SpaceX has launched so far this year.  Granted there's a lot of Starlink in there, but look at the rest (13 missions) and decide if any of these qualify as useful -

Thank you for your facts.

/But I'm pretty sure JWST launched on an Ariane.
//And dirtying up the sky for amateur astronomers is whack.


You two were exchanging on value and that exchange ends on a point re: amateur astronomers?
 
2022-07-23 11:56:45 PM  

BlazeTrailer: iron de havilland: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Here's what SpaceX has launched so far this year.  Granted there's a lot of Starlink in there, but look at the rest (13 missions) and decide if any of these qualify as useful -

Thank you for your facts.

/But I'm pretty sure JWST launched on an Ariane.
//And dirtying up the sky for amateur astronomers is whack.

You two were exchanging on value and that exchange ends on a point re: amateur astronomers?


It is one of the few fields in which amateurs still have an important voice. Just wankers in their garden or back bedroom extending their 6-inchers.

/OK so I did just make a bunch of knob jokes, but I do truly believe in the importance of amateur astronomy, and if that means that sons of the soil can't get internet, so be it.
//I mean, if you want internet, move to where the internet is.
 
2022-07-24 1:52:03 AM  
It doesn't wash.

Light pollution messes up terrestrial observing too, but we're not going to black out our largest cities so a few ossified professors can hole up in their mountaintop retreats for days at a time on the taxpayer dime.

JWST just showed that we can move optical and IR astronomy off-world.
 
2022-07-24 6:12:26 AM  

iron de havilland: //I mean, if you want internet, move to where the internet is.


I've got mine, so fark you?
 
2022-07-24 6:15:37 AM  

studebaker hoch: In other news.....I don't know who they have writing for inverse.com but they should wait for their coffee to kick in before submitting their stories.

[Fark user image 754x594]


I doubt the author is at fault. That stinks of an editor. And I bet at one time the caption was right, but someone found a cooler image and swapped it in forgetting (or not caring) to update the caption.
 
2022-07-24 6:29:52 AM  

studebaker hoch: It doesn't wash.

Light pollution messes up terrestrial observing too, but we're not going to black out our largest cities so a few ossified professors can hole up in their mountaintop retreats for days at a time on the taxpayer dime.

JWST just showed that we can move optical and IR astronomy off-world.


Actually it hasn't.  This just in: astronomers need far more telescopes than what has been launched or could practically could be launched. Also space telescopes are also small compared to terrestrial obsevatories. There is still a lot of astronomy that can't be done in orbit yet.

/This applies to wavelengths that can be observed on Earth (like optical).  Some can't and must be done in space.
//JWST is not an optical telescope. Hubble is.
 
2022-07-24 7:23:24 AM  

turboke: iron de havilland: //I mean, if you want internet, move to where the internet is.

I've got mine, so fark you?


I mean, yeah, that comment could read like that.

Except Starlink farks up the sky for everyone no matter where you are. It makes ground-based astronomy harder over the entire planet.

And the benefits it brings? You can now access Twitter and Facebook in places that used to be refuges from the Internet.

Yay us, I guess.
 
2022-07-24 7:28:00 AM  

TheMysteriousStranger: practically could be launched


This is a thread about weekly launches by just one of the existing launch providers. ;)

But payload size and serviceability. And building something like the VLA on solid ground doesn't require manoeuvring capabilities to keep them in position.

Starship will increase payload size. Maybe build them on the far side of the Moon? Assembly and repairs aren't impossible. Harder if you buld them on Mars, but you're farther from the Sun there so it has that going for it.

From an engineering standpoint, what can't be solved in orbit or on another body? Protection by the atmosphere/magnetosphere I can imagine. But JWST doesn't have that either.
 
2022-07-24 7:31:02 AM  

iron de havilland: turboke: iron de havilland: //I mean, if you want internet, move to where the internet is.

I've got mine, so fark you?

I mean, yeah, that comment could read like that.

Except Starlink farks up the sky for everyone no matter where you are. It makes ground-based astronomy harder over the entire planet.

And the benefits it brings? You can now access Twitter and Facebook in places that used to be refuges from the Internet.

Yay us, I guess.


The world would be a better place without Twitter and Facebook. But in general, access to information.

https://www.mediasupport.org/blogpost/access-to-information-a-human-right-and-a-precondition-for-democracy/
 
2022-07-24 8:01:06 AM  

turboke: iron de havilland: turboke: iron de havilland: //I mean, if you want internet, move to where the internet is.

I've got mine, so fark you?

I mean, yeah, that comment could read like that.

Except Starlink farks up the sky for everyone no matter where you are. It makes ground-based astronomy harder over the entire planet.

And the benefits it brings? You can now access Twitter and Facebook in places that used to be refuges from the Internet.

Yay us, I guess.

The world would be a better place without Twitter and Facebook. But in general, access to information.

https://www.mediasupport.org/blogpost/access-to-information-a-human-right-and-a-precondition-for-democracy/


But that's bullshiat.

The noble ideal is that access to information makes us all smarter.

The reality is:

external-content.duckduckgo.comView Full Size
 
2022-07-24 8:13:53 AM  
iron de havilland:
Fark user imageView Full Size


Well, they did tell you explicitly in 1996 not to trust them on the internet. ∎
 
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