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(NASA)   The cause of CAPSTONE's communication problem determined: Bad radio command sent to the probe farked its radio and software problem meant the radio was not rebooted. And yet the probe has lived to fight another day   (blogs.nasa.gov) divider line
    More: Misc, NASA, Orbit, Spacecraft propulsion, Moon, Deep Space Network, Spacecraft, Force, NASA's CAPSTONE  
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427 clicks; posted to STEM » on 07 Jul 2022 at 6:09 PM (12 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



20 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-07-07 6:10:21 PM  
Glad they got it sorted out.
 
2022-07-07 6:14:31 PM  
Someone forgot a semicolon.
 
2022-07-07 6:16:33 PM  
How soon before the first successful hacking of a spacecraft?
 
2022-07-07 6:22:19 PM  

Olympic Trolling Judge: Someone forgot a semicolon.


Better than a parentheses.
 
2022-07-07 6:22:24 PM  

I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: How soon before the first successful hacking of a spacecraft?


Wasn't there an article saying that one of the Mars probes is running Windows 98?  Why hack it when you can wait for .vxd driver to bluescreen it.
 
2022-07-07 6:23:36 PM  

I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: How soon before the first successful hacking of a spacecraft?


It has already happened more than once.  I seem to remember a German group reactivating a NASA satellite that had a problem and was abandoned.
 
2022-07-07 6:23:39 PM  

I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: How soon before the first successful hacking of a spacecraft?


You should have searched for the answer to your question.
 
2022-07-07 6:37:28 PM  

OkieDookie: I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: How soon before the first successful hacking of a spacecraft?

Wasn't there an article saying that one of the Mars probes is running Windows 98?  Why hack it when you can wait for .vxd driver to bluescreen it.


No, only a Fark headline implying it. The Earth-side development tools ran on Windows 98 so they had some difficulty when they wanted to write and upload a new version of the software.
 
2022-07-07 6:50:03 PM  

I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: How soon before the first successful hacking of a spacecraft?


We're already there, it happened in the 80s with HBO, in 2009 with Navy satellites, Viasat was hacked by Russians shortly before the Ukrainian invasion, the list goes on. There are even satellite hacking CTFs now.
 
2022-07-07 7:02:54 PM  
a buddy of mine was a software engineer on the the mars probe that crashed because of an english/metric conversion.  We used to joke with him that he's the one responsible for crashing the probe....
 
2022-07-07 7:20:27 PM  
I suspect anyone who's been around more than one space mission has similar tales of command / software woe.

(Possible exception for people whose only mission was JWST, with its obsessive devotion to getting things right the first time since there'd be no way to fix it.)

I heard of one mission where < and > were swapped, so satellites launched with code saying to disable communications when the battery charge level was greaterthan a certain percent.  Oopsie.
 
2022-07-07 8:38:19 PM  
The first Mars rover used the vxWorks operating system. vxWorks is the operating system that you use when failure is not an option. The rover developed a reboot problem from a watchdog timeout, caused by an honest-to-god priority inversion bug in the OS. Finding a bug in vxWorks is like finding a herd of unicorns, but it happened. vxWorks fixed the problem, they rebuilt the software, and then updated the running software on the fly, over a 9600 baud radio link from here to Mars. Problem solved.
 
2022-07-07 8:59:52 PM  

Olympic Trolling Judge: Someone forgot a semicolon.


I C what you did there
 
2022-07-07 9:17:00 PM  

OkieDookie: I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: How soon before the first successful hacking of a spacecraft?

Wasn't there an article saying that one of the Mars probes is running Windows 98?  Why hack it when you can wait for .vxd driver to bluescreen it.


I thought they used VXWorks? Nobody in their right mind would put Windows on a spacecraft.
 
2022-07-08 2:01:14 AM  

I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: How soon before the first successful hacking of a spacecraft?


I'm thinking 70 years ago. There's tales of "unfarking" stuff that's older than almost everyone you know that pretty much boil down to "hacking" (in the real sense, not the popular media sense) hardware that has no business continuing to work.

.Gov space, for all the countries who do such, tends to have SCARY smart people who can make 2x3axis gyros with 2 broken axes generate 6 axes. With software that was never intended to do so.

Dig in to "failures" of spacecraft, you're going to find a spectacular cornucopia of "how the FARK did you even figure that out?" Most of them never make the popular media, and that's a shame, because the sheer genius (usually, spectacularly simple and yet entirely outside the "book") of these people deserves to be shown worldwide.

As a maintenance schmuck, I endeavored to be 1/10th as bright as these people. Frankly, my best moment was rattlecanning a distillation tower black and eliminating the entire reflux system, and that's an acorn at the feet of Archimedes in comparison.

These people are SCARY smart. I mean you literally do not comprehend how they think. They jump over a week's work and don't even know they did so. These are the 1 in 50,000 minds.
 
2022-07-08 2:12:02 AM  

GrendelMk1: I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: How soon before the first successful hacking of a spacecraft?

I'm thinking 70 years ago. There's tales of "unfarking" stuff that's older than almost everyone you know that pretty much boil down to "hacking" (in the real sense, not the popular media sense) hardware that has no business continuing to work.

.Gov space, for all the countries who do such, tends to have SCARY smart people who can make 2x3axis gyros with 2 broken axes generate 6 axes. With software that was never intended to do so.

Dig in to "failures" of spacecraft, you're going to find a spectacular cornucopia of "how the FARK did you even figure that out?" Most of them never make the popular media, and that's a shame, because the sheer genius (usually, spectacularly simple and yet entirely outside the "book") of these people deserves to be shown worldwide.

As a maintenance schmuck, I endeavored to be 1/10th as bright as these people. Frankly, my best moment was rattlecanning a distillation tower black and eliminating the entire reflux system, and that's an acorn at the feet of Archimedes in comparison.

These people are SCARY smart. I mean you literally do not comprehend how they think. They jump over a week's work and don't even know they did so. These are the 1 in 50,000 minds.


May I recommend the "curiousmarc" youtube channel?
 
2022-07-08 3:30:18 AM  
Flowery Twats:

May I recommend the "curiousmarc" youtube channel?

No, but only because I'm pretty sure he's the guy whose channel was all over Ars Technica's Apollo anniversary series a while back :P

Just reading up on how the flight computers worked, why Apollo 11 could have crashed, and how they fixed most of the problems they encountered is mind boggling. Set SCE to Aux implies that the guy saying so knew the electronics so well he knew exactly what popped when the lightning hit, based on readbacks from someone on top of a bomb in the middle of a storm.

The shiat people used to pull off as a matter of course makes me think of Mel. Addressing things so the read head will be in just the right place, every time...

http://catb.org/jargon/html/story-of-mel.html
 
2022-07-08 6:09:59 AM  

I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: How soon before the first successful hacking of a spacecraft?


Others have pointed out examples.  I don't think it has happened to anything intended to leave Earth orbit yet.
 
2022-07-08 7:24:45 AM  

GrendelMk1: I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: How soon before the first successful hacking of a spacecraft?

I'm thinking 70 years ago. There's tales of "unfarking" stuff that's older than almost everyone you know that pretty much boil down to "hacking" (in the real sense, not the popular media sense) hardware that has no business continuing to work.

.Gov space, for all the countries who do such, tends to have SCARY smart people who can make 2x3axis gyros with 2 broken axes generate 6 axes. With software that was never intended to do so.

Dig in to "failures" of spacecraft, you're going to find a spectacular cornucopia of "how the FARK did you even figure that out?" Most of them never make the popular media, and that's a shame, because the sheer genius (usually, spectacularly simple and yet entirely outside the "book") of these people deserves to be shown worldwide.

As a maintenance schmuck, I endeavored to be 1/10th as bright as these people. Frankly, my best moment was rattlecanning a distillation tower black and eliminating the entire reflux system, and that's an acorn at the feet of Archimedes in comparison.

These people are SCARY smart. I mean you literally do not comprehend how they think. They jump over a week's work and don't even know they did so. These are the 1 in 50,000 minds.


How many still end up voting Republican.
 
2022-07-08 7:26:01 AM  

TheMysteriousStranger: I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: How soon before the first successful hacking of a spacecraft?

Others have pointed out examples.  I don't think it has happened to anything intended to leave Earth orbit yet.


That one XKCD about a piece of code being maintained by one guy in Nebraska.
 
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