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(ProPublica)   Your insufferable food snob friend's "organically raised" chicken fillets and your mundane store brand chicken fillets may actually be coming from the same salmonella infested processing plant   (propublica.org) divider line
    More: Scary, Organic food, Tyson Foods, Organic certification, National Organic Program, Brand, Grocery store, different plants, Meat  
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331 clicks; posted to Food » on 07 Jul 2022 at 5:42 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



27 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-07-07 6:43:05 AM  
Nah, my salmonella is farm raised.
 
2022-07-07 6:51:50 AM  
And then driven to the same store on the same truck. So what?
 
2022-07-07 7:23:28 AM  
Obvious tag sick in the bathroom?
 
2022-07-07 7:28:36 AM  
Obvious tag having trouble keeping solid food down today?
 
2022-07-07 7:32:43 AM  
Every time I see "organic", "free-range" poultry for, like $15 per pound, I just imagine a slightly cleaner shelf in the factory farm shed with the broken legs and snipped beaks and hormone injections, and a convenient, untraceable payment to an FDA inspector... if they ever even get inspected in a decade of operation thanks to the downsizing of the FDA.

What makes more sense?  That they'd just buy slightly different packaging and charge a 400% markup because they think you won't be able to tell, or that they'd actually spend $10+ per pound raising chickens when they don't have to?

If licensed Sommeliers with decades of experience literally can't tell Two Buck Chuck from rare vintages in a blind test if you just add a little food coloring, what are the odds you'd actually know you're eating factory-farmed, hormone-pumped chicken, hm?

Hell, I can barely believe the "no solution added" stickers at this point...
 
2022-07-07 8:00:41 AM  
Well, yeah. Lots of chicken farms; relatively few chicken processing plants. Many-to-one relationship is obvious.

How a chicken is grown and raised before death vs. how a chicken is processed after death are two very different things.

But the U.S. Department of Agriculture doesn't currently differentiate between high- and low-risk salmonella when monitoring processing plants, and it doesn't prevent raw poultry contaminated with salmonella from being sold.

Imagine if it did. Imagine if salmonella contamination level became a selling point.
 
2022-07-07 8:20:08 AM  
"Poultry products from the same plant weren't necessarily raised with the same practices or on the same farms. Birds sold with specialty labels like organic, for example, are raised and processed separately from conventional birds, and equipment is sanitized between shifts."

So the nicely raised chicken you are buying was raised in a completely different place, using the standards that you are looking for - but happened to be processed and packaged in a plant that, at different times and after sanitation, processes other less pampered brands?

This is one of the stupidest wastes of money and electrons I have seen in a long time. This is nothing more than clickbait begging for attention, and Fark - to the rescue.
 
2022-07-07 8:27:46 AM  
Wait.  Are you telling me that just because a package SAYS something, it doesn't necessarily mean it's true.

Next you're probably going to tell me that spring water doesn't really come from a spring, and is actually just regular tap water that has been filtered.
 
2022-07-07 8:47:09 AM  

TheOtherGuy: Every time I see "organic", "free-range" poultry for, like $15 per pound, I just imagine a slightly cleaner shelf in the factory farm shed with the broken legs and snipped beaks and hormone injections, and a convenient, untraceable payment to an FDA inspector... if they ever even get inspected in a decade of operation thanks to the downsizing of the FDA.


This does depend a lot on where you live. We know the people who raise the chickens we buy... probably some of the last farmers in the world raising chickens that aren't employees of a corporation directly. Same thing for our beef, lamb, pork, turkey, and duck. All of it is "local" production... This is, of course, relative as it's less than 500 miles but not your neighbors. However the big change came about because a large number of small farmers decided they didn't want to go out of business selling to (examples) JBS or Smithfield so they changed methods a little. This allowed them to start selling at farmer's markets and butcher shops directly, which led to some grocery stores carrying their products in the butcher case.

Covid-19 merely accelerated this trend, as the price skyrocketed because JBS and the like price gouged. That meant that smaller farmers were able to charge closer pricing, and make good profit, selling organic meat. Heritage pork, in particular, has been an excellent seller for good profit along with lamb.

So if they're in the "local" section (a lot of stores have this now) they might not have been raised on a factory farm.
 
2022-07-07 9:00:33 AM  
Wait, his name wasn't really Colin after all?
 
2022-07-07 9:03:45 AM  
Two things.  All chicken in America has salmonella, no matter if it's organic or not.  Second, being organic isn't about how it's processed, it's about how it's raised...
 
2022-07-07 9:10:25 AM  
It even happens outside the factory farming system.  We started buying as much as possible from CSAs when the hoarding began at the beginning of the pandemic, and we buy most of our animal proteins from three farmers now.  They all send their meats to the same packer, regardless of the protein.  Yak, beef, chicken, turkey, pork -- doesn't matter, there are so few packers that all of the business gets funneled into the few that are out there.

We have a really good relationship with one of the farmers, and she said they don't even get to decide on the mix of ingredients that go into something like a sausage.  They started selling a jalapeno cheddar sausage, and I commented to her that more jalapeno would be great.  She said they can't, it's up to the packer how much goes into it.
 
2022-07-07 9:35:35 AM  

inglixthemad: TheOtherGuy: Every time I see "organic", "free-range" poultry for, like $15 per pound, I just imagine a slightly cleaner shelf in the factory farm shed with the broken legs and snipped beaks and hormone injections, and a convenient, untraceable payment to an FDA inspector... if they ever even get inspected in a decade of operation thanks to the downsizing of the FDA.

This does depend a lot on where you live. We know the people who raise the chickens we buy... probably some of the last farmers in the world raising chickens that aren't employees of a corporation directly. Same thing for our beef, lamb, pork, turkey, and duck. All of it is "local" production... This is, of course, relative as it's less than 500 miles but not your neighbors. However the big change came about because a large number of small farmers decided they didn't want to go out of business selling to (examples) JBS or Smithfield so they changed methods a little. This allowed them to start selling at farmer's markets and butcher shops directly, which led to some grocery stores carrying their products in the butcher case.

Covid-19 merely accelerated this trend, as the price skyrocketed because JBS and the like price gouged. That meant that smaller farmers were able to charge closer pricing, and make good profit, selling organic meat. Heritage pork, in particular, has been an excellent seller for good profit along with lamb.

So if they're in the "local" section (a lot of stores have this now) they might not have been raised on a factory farm.


Exactly. And you can now get the occasional "heritage breed" which may have different characteristics

My local meat farm is all about less common varieties (makes it easier to charge what they need to charge and stay profitable when it's harder to compare price) that are very yummy. Chicken with tiny breasts and big, well muscled legs is just going to be a different meal.

There's an abattoir nearby that handles all the local farms and that has its own butcher shop out front that is probably 90% primal cuts and big roasts. Get great meat and portion it out however I want.

Reasonable pricing on half and quarter animals too
 
2022-07-07 9:42:26 AM  

montreal_medic: Chicken with tiny breasts and big, well muscled legs is just going to be a different meal.


I will say it is nice to not have "mutant" chicken / turkey / beef / pork. Yes, it typically does taste better especially the beef and pork. Chicken is still kind of just chicken... although the darker meat is much better tasting.

montreal_medic: Reasonable pricing on half and quarter animals too


Kids are all growed up now, so we do a lot less buying of whole (or half... or quarter) animals. However you are correct... as long as you have a freezer to store the meat.
 
2022-07-07 10:19:55 AM  

FormlessOne: Well, yeah. Lots of chicken farms; relatively few chicken processing plants. Many-to-one relationship is obvious.

How a chicken is grown and raised before death vs. how a chicken is processed after death are two very different things.

But the U.S. Department of Agriculture doesn't currently differentiate between high- and low-risk salmonella when monitoring processing plants, and it doesn't prevent raw poultry contaminated with salmonella from being sold.

Imagine if it did. Imagine if salmonella contamination level became a selling point.


"Great for rapid weight loss!"
 
2022-07-07 11:20:57 AM  

GRCooper: FormlessOne: Well, yeah. Lots of chicken farms; relatively few chicken processing plants. Many-to-one relationship is obvious.

How a chicken is grown and raised before death vs. how a chicken is processed after death are two very different things.

But the U.S. Department of Agriculture doesn't currently differentiate between high- and low-risk salmonella when monitoring processing plants, and it doesn't prevent raw poultry contaminated with salmonella from being sold.

Imagine if it did. Imagine if salmonella contamination level became a selling point.

"Great for rapid weight loss!"


I was thinking more "low-risk processor = 'super premium chicken'," but I like where your head's at, my friend.
 
2022-07-07 1:56:14 PM  
Do people actually think that organic mean no salmonella?
 
2022-07-07 2:31:38 PM  
As long as you cook the chicken properly, there's no problem.

"Medium rare chicken" is not an option in restaurants for a REASON.
 
2022-07-07 3:02:40 PM  

Saborlas: As long as you cook the chicken properly, there's no problem.

"Medium rare chicken" is not an option in restaurants for a REASON.


cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.netView Full Size
 
2022-07-07 3:37:10 PM  

Saborlas: As long as you cook the chicken properly, there's no problem.

"Medium rare chicken" is not an option in restaurants for a REASON.


But would you eat Paula Patton deluxe medium rare fried chicken?
Paula Patton full instagram fry Chicken video
Youtube 3S4lCXwC9E4
 
2022-07-07 8:02:18 PM  
The only way to avoid tainted meat is to go vegetarian.

This story about the organic meat that was not organic keeps repeating itself every couple of months, and those are the cases the media know about and decide to publish.
 
2022-07-07 8:41:20 PM  

TechnoHead: The only way to avoid tainted meat is to go vegetarian.

This story about the organic meat that was not organic keeps repeating itself every couple of months, and those are the cases the media know about and decide to publish.


...this isn't that, though. The organic meat is still organic. The fact that it's processed with non-organic meat does not somehow make it non-organic.

"Organic" or "free-range" is not the same as "kosher" or "halal." The former describes how it was grown and raised; the latter describes how it was killed & processed.
 
2022-07-07 8:44:08 PM  
It's interesting that consumers conflate "organic" and "free-range" with terms like "kosher" and "halal" - it must be confusing to discover that "organic free-range kosher" chicken exists, and that not all "organic" chicken is "kosher" chicken...
 
2022-07-07 8:46:03 PM  

FormlessOne: TechnoHead: The only way to avoid tainted meat is to go vegetarian.

This story about the organic meat that was not organic keeps repeating itself every couple of months, and those are the cases the media know about and decide to publish.

...this isn't that, though. The organic meat is still organic. The fact that it's processed with non-organic meat does not somehow make it non-organic.

"Organic" or "free-range" is not the same as "kosher" or "halal." The former describes how it was grown and raised; the latter describes how it was killed & processed.


...with some overlap, I should say in the interests of being thorough. Raising a chicken to kosher standards overlaps with raising a chicken to organic standards, but organic standards stop when that chicken's killed, whereas kosher standards apparently continue.
 
2022-07-07 8:47:23 PM  

Saborlas: As long as you cook the chicken properly, there's no problem.

"Medium rare chicken" is not an option in restaurants for a REASON.


...in the United States. Oddly, not all countries have contaminated their poultry production so thoroughly that salmonella contamination is automatically assumed. In Japan, salmonella is almost non-existent, in both eggs and poultry.
 
2022-07-07 9:59:01 PM  

FormlessOne: Saborlas: As long as you cook the chicken properly, there's no problem.

"Medium rare chicken" is not an option in restaurants for a REASON.

...in the United States. Oddly, not all countries have contaminated their poultry production so thoroughly that salmonella contamination is automatically assumed. In Japan, salmonella is almost non-existent, in both eggs and poultry.


FormlessOne: Saborlas: As long as you cook the chicken properly, there's no problem.

"Medium rare chicken" is not an option in restaurants for a REASON.

...in the United States. Oddly, not all countries have contaminated their poultry production so thoroughly that salmonella contamination is automatically assumed. In Japan, salmonella is almost non-existent, in both eggs and poultry.


I think it was in Fast Food Nationwhere the author talked about poultry processing plants in the US that also shipped to the EU.  Because the standards for the EU were so much more stringent, the throughput was less.  IIRC one aspect was that the chickens in the US could be treated with bleach to sanitize them, but the ones bound for the EU had to be processed in such a way that they didn't become contaminated in the first place.
 
2022-07-07 10:41:59 PM  

inglixthemad: This does depend a lot on where you live. We know the people who raise the chickens we buy... probably some of the last farmers in the world raising chickens that aren't employees of a corporation directly.


No, they're everywhere now.  We get our chicken from a small farmer and we have several choices of local vendors to choose from at the farmers market.
 
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