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(Lifehacker)   Meanwhile, Clairified butter has mayo and MSG in it   (lifehacker.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Butter, Milk, Indian cooking, clarified butters, Cooking, summer months, Clarified butter, room temperature  
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756 clicks; posted to Food » on 05 Jul 2022 at 10:20 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



33 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-07-05 5:44:42 PM  
I'm glad that you made butter easier to understand.
 
2022-07-05 6:05:24 PM  
nice one Subs!
 
2022-07-05 8:16:17 PM  
I use ghee in reverse seer steaks and pork chops because of the high temperature smoke point. Over 400 degrees F. Makes a nice crust and it is easy to clean the cast iron pan after.
 
2022-07-05 8:59:45 PM  
Infused ghee > infused butter
 
2022-07-05 9:52:39 PM  
Ghee is awesome for making popcorn.
 
2022-07-05 10:21:17 PM  

ruudbob: I use ghee in reverse seer steaks and pork chops because of the high temperature smoke point. Over 400 degrees F. Makes a nice crust and it is easy to clean the cast iron pan after.


Well, obviously, you just soap it up then stick it in the dishwasher, right?

/IIRC the oils with the highest smoke points are rapeseed and peanut.
//ICBW.
 
2022-07-05 10:22:39 PM  

ruudbob: I use ghee in reverse seer steaks and pork chops because of the high temperature smoke point. Over 400 degrees F. Makes a nice crust and it is easy to clean the cast iron pan after.


Just used ghee for burgers last night. Same punchline as you there. They were awesome.


Also subs, don't need MSG in ghee. That's what hing is for.
 
2022-07-05 10:47:59 PM  
Well golly ghee ...

/ cheesy pun in the dairy aisle.
 
2022-07-05 10:58:21 PM  
Claire should be lowered into a pot of heated ghee.

/seriously
//We hadda stop with the cannibal sammiches
///Stop. With the goddam. Motherfycking. CLAIRE shiat!!!
 
2022-07-05 10:59:33 PM  

olrasputin: ruudbob: I use ghee in reverse seer steaks and pork chops because of the high temperature smoke point. Over 400 degrees F. Makes a nice crust and it is easy to clean the cast iron pan after.

Just used ghee for burgers last night. Same punchline as you there. They were awesome.


Also subs, don't need MSG in ghee. That's what hing is for.


it can be both who says it can't!
 
2022-07-05 11:04:08 PM  
TFA contains no mention of MSG...

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-07-05 11:05:06 PM  
This thread reminds me of a not so cool story. A friend used to do tv nights and it ended up getting quite crowded at times. Don't recall if this was X-Files or a later popular show but the idea is that we would all show up to see the show every week as it was aired. Remember that?

Some of the younger folk offered to clean up and got a little overzealous with the brillo pad. My friend walked into the kitchen quite happy and amazed at how folk had helped out until he saw his iron pan.

"Th-th-th-tha that pan came from my grandmother and it's been seasoned for almost a hundred years!"

The poor kid was horrified and ashamed. Not a great way to learn about cast iron but I bet the lesson stuck. (They were in their early 20's at the time, we can call twenty somethings kids, right?)
 
2022-07-05 11:32:54 PM  

baxterdog: This thread reminds me of a not so cool story. A friend used to do tv nights and it ended up getting quite crowded at times. Don't recall if this was X-Files or a later popular show but the idea is that we would all show up to see the show every week as it was aired. Remember that?

Some of the younger folk offered to clean up and got a little overzealous with the brillo pad. My friend walked into the kitchen quite happy and amazed at how folk had helped out until he saw his iron pan.

"Th-th-th-tha that pan came from my grandmother and it's been seasoned for almost a hundred years!"

The poor kid was horrified and ashamed. Not a great way to learn about cast iron but I bet the lesson stuck. (They were in their early 20's at the time, we can call twenty somethings kids, right?)


They removed 100-year-old seasoning with a brillo pad? I find that hard to believe.
 
2022-07-05 11:41:01 PM  
I wonder if she knows how much Fark thinks about her
 
2022-07-05 11:48:07 PM  

baxterdog: This thread reminds me of a not so cool story. A friend used to do tv nights and it ended up getting quite crowded at times. Don't recall if this was X-Files or a later popular show but the idea is that we would all show up to see the show every week as it was aired. Remember that?

Some of the younger folk offered to clean up and got a little overzealous with the brillo pad. My friend walked into the kitchen quite happy and amazed at how folk had helped out until he saw his iron pan.

"Th-th-th-tha that pan came from my grandmother and it's been seasoned for almost a hundred years!"

The poor kid was horrified and ashamed. Not a great way to learn about cast iron but I bet the lesson stuck. (They were in their early 20's at the time, we can call twenty somethings kids, right?)


Ouuuuuch. That sucks. I have a similar story from just this past weekend. I have a 10 inch Martin Stove and Range Co pan that has been through a few generations. I broke it out this weekend to pay fry some burgers on hot coals outside.

I was in  charge of cooking, but not cleanup. Walked in the house to find my friends room mate cleaning the pan with soap :/

Burgers  were good at least.

*sigh*
 
2022-07-06 3:05:32 AM  
I put MSG in everything. Even where it doesn't belong.
 
2022-07-06 3:37:59 AM  
Sensei Can You See:

They removed 100-year-old seasoning with a brillo pad? I find that hard to believe.

Did I write that they they made it shiny? No, I didn't. But it sure was messed up and would take some time to be returned to its previous state. Think about it a bit. Do you even cast iron, bro?
 
2022-07-06 4:11:42 AM  

baxterdog: Sensei Can You See:

They removed 100-year-old seasoning with a brillo pad? I find that hard to believe.

Did I write that they they made it shiny? No, I didn't. But it sure was messed up and would take some time to be returned to its previous state. Think about it a bit. Do you even cast iron, bro?


I do. To actually fark up 100 years of seasoning, you'd have to get one of the industrial cleaning pads that has a stem so you can put it on a farking drill. Either that, or scour by hand for farking days.

Good seasoning is deep into the metal, and you're not farking it up with 10 minutes of a brillo pad. You can use soap on it if you need to as well, and it'll be fine as long as you don't leave it to soak for hours. My cast is about 80 years old, and I do a lot of the things people say will kill it. Never had an issue.

It's a big chunk of metal that gets hot treated with oil regularly for decades. It's not fragile. Just don't be incredibly stupid, and you'll be fine. Like, don't soak it in soapy water to clean it when it's brand new and has maybe 3 days of use on it, THAT will fark it up. RIP my friend's brand new cast iron...
 
2022-07-06 5:22:42 AM  
Remind me to never have the Lifehacker staff clarify butter for my kitchen.
 
2022-07-06 7:59:11 AM  

iron de havilland: ruudbob: I use ghee in reverse seer steaks and pork chops because of the high temperature smoke point. Over 400 degrees F. Makes a nice crust and it is easy to clean the cast iron pan after.

Well, obviously, you just soap it up then stick it in the dishwasher, right?

/IIRC the oils with the highest smoke points are rapeseed and peanut.
//ICBW.


Avocado is highest with peanut pretty close behind.  Rapeseed = less refined canola, which is still high but not a high as those others.
 
2022-07-06 9:35:18 AM  

zeroflight222: iron de havilland: ruudbob: I use ghee in reverse seer steaks and pork chops because of the high temperature smoke point. Over 400 degrees F. Makes a nice crust and it is easy to clean the cast iron pan after.

Well, obviously, you just soap it up then stick it in the dishwasher, right?

/IIRC the oils with the highest smoke points are rapeseed and peanut.
//ICBW.

Avocado is highest with peanut pretty close behind.  Rapeseed = less refined canola, which is still high but not a high as those others.


Canola isn't a term that's generally used in the UK. All rapeseed oil is just called rapeseed oil.
 
jbc [TotalFark]
2022-07-06 9:36:36 AM  

iron de havilland: zeroflight222: iron de havilland: ruudbob: I use ghee in reverse seer steaks and pork chops because of the high temperature smoke point. Over 400 degrees F. Makes a nice crust and it is easy to clean the cast iron pan after.

Well, obviously, you just soap it up then stick it in the dishwasher, right?

/IIRC the oils with the highest smoke points are rapeseed and peanut.
//ICBW.

Avocado is highest with peanut pretty close behind.  Rapeseed = less refined canola, which is still high but not a high as those others.

Canola isn't a term that's generally used in the UK. All rapeseed oil is just called rapeseed oil.


You said rapeseed twice.
 
2022-07-06 9:40:36 AM  

jbc: iron de havilland: zeroflight222: iron de havilland: ruudbob: I use ghee in reverse seer steaks and pork chops because of the high temperature smoke point. Over 400 degrees F. Makes a nice crust and it is easy to clean the cast iron pan after.

Well, obviously, you just soap it up then stick it in the dishwasher, right?

/IIRC the oils with the highest smoke points are rapeseed and peanut.
//ICBW.

Avocado is highest with peanut pretty close behind.  Rapeseed = less refined canola, which is still high but not a high as those others.

Canola isn't a term that's generally used in the UK. All rapeseed oil is just called rapeseed oil.

You said rapeseed twice.


Heh, I hoped someone would notice that 😜
 
2022-07-06 9:46:34 AM  

jbc: iron de havilland: zeroflight222: iron de havilland: ruudbob: I use ghee in reverse seer steaks and pork chops because of the high temperature smoke point. Over 400 degrees F. Makes a nice crust and it is easy to clean the cast iron pan after.

Well, obviously, you just soap it up then stick it in the dishwasher, right?

/IIRC the oils with the highest smoke points are rapeseed and peanut.
//ICBW.

Avocado is highest with peanut pretty close behind.  Rapeseed = less refined canola, which is still high but not a high as those others.

Canola isn't a term that's generally used in the UK. All rapeseed oil is just called rapeseed oil.

You said rapeseed twice.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-07-06 11:11:14 AM  
Grandma's cigarette ashes were baked right into that pan. We'll never get that special seasoning back.
 
2022-07-06 12:05:19 PM  

iron de havilland: zeroflight222: iron de havilland: ruudbob: I use ghee in reverse seer steaks and pork chops because of the high temperature smoke point. Over 400 degrees F. Makes a nice crust and it is easy to clean the cast iron pan after.

Well, obviously, you just soap it up then stick it in the dishwasher, right?

/IIRC the oils with the highest smoke points are rapeseed and peanut.
//ICBW.

Avocado is highest with peanut pretty close behind.  Rapeseed = less refined canola, which is still high but not a high as those others.

Canola isn't a term that's generally used in the UK. All rapeseed oil is just called rapeseed oil.


Generally, if a country distinguishes between the two (US, Canada, Australia off the top of my head), Canola is the culinarily refined version of a particular edible variant of rapeseed (naturally lower in acidic compounds that would make for bad culinary use).  While general rapeseed can encompass any seed variant including non-edible industrial ones.  But if it's on a reputable grocery store shelf, we're all safe.
 
2022-07-06 12:18:42 PM  
I'll just leave this here.

Early American Dairy
 
2022-07-06 12:54:11 PM  

GrendelMk1: baxterdog: Sensei Can You See:

They removed 100-year-old seasoning with a brillo pad? I find that hard to believe.

Did I write that they they made it shiny? No, I didn't. But it sure was messed up and would take some time to be returned to its previous state. Think about it a bit. Do you even cast iron, bro?

I do. To actually fark up 100 years of seasoning, you'd have to get one of the industrial cleaning pads that has a stem so you can put it on a farking drill. Either that, or scour by hand for farking days.

Good seasoning is deep into the metal, and you're not farking it up with 10 minutes of a brillo pad. You can use soap on it if you need to as well, and it'll be fine as long as you don't leave it to soak for hours. My cast is about 80 years old, and I do a lot of the things people say will kill it. Never had an issue.

It's a big chunk of metal that gets hot treated with oil regularly for decades. It's not fragile. Just don't be incredibly stupid, and you'll be fine. Like, don't soak it in soapy water to clean it when it's brand new and has maybe 3 days of use on it, THAT will fark it up. RIP my friend's brand new cast iron...


Correct. Cast iron myths are ridiculous.

A little soap and a light scour for extra crusty pans won't hurt, if the pan is well seasoned. Just dry it well after. I heat it and wipe it down with a little Crisco.
Soap in the pan will not poison you! (I heard that one in my son's scout troop... from the scout master! He was awesome, otherwise)
If you need to re-season, tossing it in fire to burn off the old seasoning is NOT the best method. It can ruin the pan. A heavy scouring will work, or if you MUST get it all off, oven cleaner or electrolysis.
And the worst myth: Lodge brand is top quality. It's inexpensive and works, but I'll stick with my vintage Griswold, BSR and Wagner. Lighter, smoother cooking surface, and a joy to use.

The worst thing you can do to your pan is not use it.
 
2022-07-06 12:55:36 PM  
Just...goddamnit guys.

We had the opportunity for a magnificent ghee and MSG thread.

And it was turned into another farking cast iron thread.
 
2022-07-06 1:21:34 PM  

GrendelMk1: baxterdog: Sensei Can You See:

They removed 100-year-old seasoning with a brillo pad? I find that hard to believe.

Did I write that they they made it shiny? No, I didn't. But it sure was messed up and would take some time to be returned to its previous state. Think about it a bit. Do you even cast iron, bro?


I do. To actually fark up 100 years of seasoning, you'd have to get one of the industrial cleaning pads that has a stem so you can put it on a farking drill. Either that, or scour by hand for farking days.


What he said. And yes; I cast iron, bro. I have one cast iron skillet I bought new; the rest I picked up at Goodwill or garage sales. They're often rusty or the seasoning is damaged, so I put them in the oven and run a self-cleaning cycle.

I see all these cooking shows and websites talking about seasoning like it's a magic potion. It's the simplest thing to rub some oil on a pan and stick it in the oven. The only fine point I'd offer would be to do that first seasoning with the pan upside down.

If you want bulletproof seasoning, IMHO the best way to do it is by using your cast iron. It's not china; cook in it and rinse it out.

If something won't just rinse off I scrub it with a Brillo or Scotch Brite pad. Easy peasy.
 
2022-07-06 6:47:28 PM  

hubiestubert: Remind me to never have the Lifehacker staff clarify butter for my kitchen.


I don't want any of my food Clairefied
 
2022-07-06 9:55:53 PM  

zeroflight222: iron de havilland: zeroflight222: iron de havilland: ruudbob: I use ghee in reverse seer steaks and pork chops because of the high temperature smoke point. Over 400 degrees F. Makes a nice crust and it is easy to clean the cast iron pan after.

Well, obviously, you just soap it up then stick it in the dishwasher, right?

/IIRC the oils with the highest smoke points are rapeseed and peanut.
//ICBW.

Avocado is highest with peanut pretty close behind.  Rapeseed = less refined canola, which is still high but not a high as those others.

Canola isn't a term that's generally used in the UK. All rapeseed oil is just called rapeseed oil.

Generally, if a country distinguishes between the two (US, Canada, Australia off the top of my head), Canola is the culinarily refined version of a particular edible variant of rapeseed (naturally lower in acidic compounds that would make for bad culinary use).  While general rapeseed can encompass any seed variant including non-edible industrial ones.  But if it's on a reputable grocery store shelf, we're all safe.


The Canadians are the ones who developed the low-erucic cultivars of rapeseed to make is safe for consumption and named it Canola: CAN for Canada+OLA, Oil, Low Acid.

A crucial part is that growers agree not to plant industrial varieties and edible varieties near each other.  Doing so yields seeds with higher than acceptable levels of erucic acid in the fields of edible varieties.

A field of of canola on the Camas Prairie (ID) last Saturday.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-07-07 1:24:49 AM  

Gough: zeroflight222: iron de havilland: zeroflight222: iron de havilland: ruudbob: I use ghee in reverse seer steaks and pork chops because of the high temperature smoke point. Over 400 degrees F. Makes a nice crust and it is easy to clean the cast iron pan after.

Well, obviously, you just soap it up then stick it in the dishwasher, right?

/IIRC the oils with the highest smoke points are rapeseed and peanut.
//ICBW.

Avocado is highest with peanut pretty close behind.  Rapeseed = less refined canola, which is still high but not a high as those others.

Canola isn't a term that's generally used in the UK. All rapeseed oil is just called rapeseed oil.

Generally, if a country distinguishes between the two (US, Canada, Australia off the top of my head), Canola is the culinarily refined version of a particular edible variant of rapeseed (naturally lower in acidic compounds that would make for bad culinary use).  While general rapeseed can encompass any seed variant including non-edible industrial ones.  But if it's on a reputable grocery store shelf, we're all safe.

The Canadians are the ones who developed the low-erucic cultivars of rapeseed to make is safe for consumption and named it Canola: CAN for Canada+OLA, Oil, Low Acid.

A crucial part is that growers agree not to plant industrial varieties and edible varieties near each other.  Doing so yields seeds with higher than acceptable levels of erucic acid in the fields of edible varieties.

A field of of canola on the Camas Prairie (ID) last Saturday.

[Fark user image 850x502]


nice pic, though....
 
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