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(The New Yorker)   Screw you guys. You bought a property that doesn't have water. That's not my issue   (newyorker.com) divider line
    More: Fail, Water, Water management, Hydrology, Water crisis, Water supply, front lines of the water wars, Aquifer, Karen Nabity's sprawling  
•       •       •

7530 clicks; posted to Main » and Politics » on 05 Jul 2022 at 5:50 PM (12 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-07-05 4:27:11 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size



/Not so funny NOW is it ?!?
 
2022-07-05 4:31:26 PM  
It's a DRY stupidity.
 
2022-07-05 4:33:43 PM  
This:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jtxew5XUVbQ

Pretty much sums it up.  People are stupid, and very much in denial.
 
2022-07-05 4:47:50 PM  
Boy, there is so much going on in this story, I don't even know where to start.

How about the obvious?

1. Settling in the desert with dicey prospects for a long-term water supply and then having horse baths, lush lawns, and fountains takes an unsustainable pattern of development and makes it exponentially more unsustainable. I suppose the people who have been there over 20 years, prior to the megadrought, could be forgiven, somewhat. But any new development within the last decade certainly seems foolish now. But easy for me to say.


2. What we have here is a classic "tragedy of the commons". The inefficient process of digging individual wells depletes the already rapidly shrinking resource until no one, regardless of their level of use, has any water at all. And to think this concept has only been around since 1833. Truly unavoidable.


3. Some residents, whose fear of governing agencies appears to overshadow their basic human need for water to continue to live, are incredibly stupid. Rather than have a "Domestic Water Improvement District" that is without question a far more efficient way to acquire and distribute water to residents, they are content to turn over control of their water supply to a private company, EPCOR, who would certainly work in residents' best interest at all times, and would never consider jacking prices on these people who are completely dependent on a private utility company for their life-sustaining water.


4. I certainly don't know this for sure, but I'd be willing to bet that a good number of these residents would cheerfully call climate change 'baloney'.


That's enough for now.
 
2022-07-05 5:26:38 PM  
Yeah. Anyone moving to the desert is desperate for something, but it's certainly not water.

/Beautiful to visit
//Water desperation is real
///I hope my city can sustain its water 🤞
 
2022-07-05 5:35:10 PM  
I live in Georgia.  We have been fighting over water with Alabama and Florida for decades.  And we get rain pretty regularly in all three states.

I cannot summon up a bit of sympathy for people who live in a desert by choice.  Especially ones that try to have the same yards they had in whatever locale was home before the desert.
 
2022-07-05 5:45:00 PM  
I have a friend who just recently pulled up stakes and moved his family to the southwest.  When I asked him if he was concerned about the increasing scarcity of water he merely shrugged.  He said 'good ol' American ingenuity' would solve that problem.
 
2022-07-05 5:50:15 PM  
I feel bad for the horses.
 
2022-07-05 5:54:07 PM  
The Free Market, deregulation, and privatizing will fix it. A few poor's may die of thirst, but that's the Price of Freedom
 
2022-07-05 5:57:12 PM  
Too bad, so sad. Looks like your house is worthless now buddy, shouldn't have built in a desert. Are we supposed to feel bad or something?
 
2022-07-05 5:59:52 PM  

Dasher McHappenstance: I have a friend who just recently pulled up stakes and moved his family to the southwest.  When I asked him if he was concerned about the increasing scarcity of water he merely shrugged.  He said 'good ol' American ingenuity' would solve that problem.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-07-05 5:59:55 PM  
Read a good article on this a year or two ago that wasn't behind a stupid paywall, Arizona's disclosure laws are basically non-existent and there's nothing stopping anyone with enough sociopath in them from buying up scrubland with no water rights or possibility of a well and dropping housing on it. With the drought going on as long as it has the city of Scottsdale has decided that they won't be selling their water to these new outlying developments and so there's no ability to even truck it in for anything close to reasonable prices.
 
2022-07-05 6:01:04 PM  
Homeowners who didn't have wells were suddenly uncertain that they'd be able to wash their dishes or flush their toilets.

Maybe they should use litter boxes instead.
 
2022-07-05 6:01:35 PM  

Rev.K: Boy, there is so much going on in this story, I don't even know where to start.

How about the obvious?

1. Settling in the desert with dicey prospects for a long-term water supply and then having horse baths, lush lawns, and fountains takes an unsustainable pattern of development and makes it exponentially more unsustainable. I suppose the people who have been there over 20 years, prior to the megadrought, could be forgiven, somewhat. But any new development within the last decade certainly seems foolish now. But easy for me to say.


2. What we have here is a classic "tragedy of the commons". The inefficient process of digging individual wells depletes the already rapidly shrinking resource until no one, regardless of their level of use, has any water at all. And to think this concept has only been around since 1833. Truly unavoidable.


3. Some residents, whose fear of governing agencies appears to overshadow their basic human need for water to continue to live, are incredibly stupid. Rather than have a "Domestic Water Improvement District" that is without question a far more efficient way to acquire and distribute water to residents, they are content to turn over control of their water supply to a private company, EPCOR, who would certainly work in residents' best interest at all times, and would never consider jacking prices on these people who are completely dependent on a private utility company for their life-sustaining water.


4. I certainly don't know this for sure, but I'd be willing to bet that a good number of these residents would cheerfully call climate change 'baloney'.


That's enough for now.


I feel bad for the guy in the article who moved there in 1999, before the drought, no one else around, apparently plenty of aquifer water. Yeah, it might have been unsustainable eventually anyway, but I bet it looked like it would be well after his lifetime. Then drought, and an influx of stupid people. Many stupid people.
 
2022-07-05 6:02:21 PM  

Klyukva: Homeowners who didn't have wells were suddenly uncertain that they'd be able to wash their dishes or flush their toilets.

Maybe they should use litter boxes instead.


Litter boxes make terrible dishwashers.
 
2022-07-05 6:04:04 PM  
Sorry folks, the area doesn't have any water.  The cactus out front should've told you.
 
2022-07-05 6:05:37 PM  
Water: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
Youtube jtxew5XUVbQ
This is definitely worth watching.
 
2022-07-05 6:06:11 PM  
"We got two great offers in, and neither of them cared about the water situation. They believe that the county is not going to let five hundred homes next to one of the wealthiest cities go without water."

Narrator: "But they did. And they will."
 
2022-07-05 6:07:02 PM  

Trainspotr: Klyukva: Homeowners who didn't have wells were suddenly uncertain that they'd be able to wash their dishes or flush their toilets.

Maybe they should use litter boxes instead.

Litter boxes make terrible dishwashers.


That's what dogs are for.
 
2022-07-05 6:07:28 PM  
Clearly, the solution is to give all the water rights to Nestle.
 
2022-07-05 6:08:44 PM  

cherryl taggart: I cannot summon up a bit of sympathy for people who live in a desert by choice.  Especially ones that try to have the same yards they had in whatever locale was home before the desert.


Yup.  I've seen this with relatives who moved out of Jersey to the desert than wanted to plant a green lawn like they had in Jersey.  They gave up after a couple of years because the cost was killing them and they went with desert landscaping.
 
2022-07-05 6:09:45 PM  
But don't look at the misplaced golf courses, poorly thought out water-intensive crops, or swimming pools.
 
2022-07-05 6:09:52 PM  

Mock26: [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/jtxew5XUVbQ] This is definitely worth watching.


I love the idea that they wanted to build a pipeline from the Mississippi River. Because nothing could possibly be difficult about that.
 
2022-07-05 6:10:48 PM  
I'd build a seaside electrolysis plant, pipe hydrogen gas to the desert, burn it for power, and sell the resulting water.

The economic feasibility depends entirely on how thirsty the desert-dwellers get.
 
2022-07-05 6:11:35 PM  

SpectroBoy: [Fark user image image 225x225]


/Not so funny NOW is it ?!?


This is exactly the post my brain formulated.
 
2022-07-05 6:12:20 PM  
Can we trade people who live near the coasts and get flooded out for people who live in deserts and don't have water?

Sounds like a new reality show!
 
2022-07-05 6:13:03 PM  
Just skip the avocado toast, Karen.
 
2022-07-05 6:13:47 PM  
There is a fair solution to this:  Everyone who wants a private agency to manage this instead of a government agency signs a document that says "I understand the government will not assist me when the water runs out.". When the water runs out and my midwest tax dollars are used to bailout people who chose to live in a desert, I'll sleep a little better knowing the people who suffered the most loss had done their own research and accepted the outcome.
 
2022-07-05 6:14:19 PM  
It'll be OK once we're all gone.
 
2022-07-05 6:14:21 PM  
I'll leave the coup de grace for the vultures and Gila Monsters.......
 
2022-07-05 6:14:31 PM  

Chthonic Echoes: I'd build a seaside electrolysis plant, pipe hydrogen gas to the desert, burn it for power, and sell the resulting water.

The economic feasibility depends entirely on how thirsty the desert-dwellers get.


The desert dwellers can send lots of power from solar in the other direction, might work out for both parties =)
 
2022-07-05 6:14:43 PM  
a nine-hundred-and-sixty-foot dry hole

But enough about Subby's mom.
 
2022-07-05 6:14:52 PM  
The idiots in Rio Verde notwithstanding, the issues with water in the southwest stem from agricultural use, not people, industry, lawns, or golf courses.

Those dimwitted deserve what they get. You want to "live free or die", here ya go.
 
2022-07-05 6:14:52 PM  
Fun fact: Brown Recluse spiders native to Arizona carry a tiny violin on their back.
Fark user imageView Full Size

/Allow me to play the song of my people
 
2022-07-05 6:17:28 PM  

Sporkabob: Sorry folks, the area doesn't have any water.  The cactus out front should've told you.


There are ways to live sustainably in that desert.
White people just don't care to learn them.
 
2022-07-05 6:18:10 PM  

ArkAngel: Mock26: [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/jtxew5XUVbQ] This is definitely worth watching.

I love the idea that they wanted to build a pipeline from the Mississippi River. Because nothing could possibly be difficult about that.


Whether it's the Mississippi river or the Great Lakes, it's probably too late.  We'll have started mining comets for water by the time the eminent domain issues are settled.
 
2022-07-05 6:19:12 PM  
Lol I lived next to Scottsdale in the mid 90's and we had a "private" water company for our area. If you drank the tap water you got the shiats for weeks
 
2022-07-05 6:19:30 PM  

Trainspotr: Klyukva: Homeowners who didn't have wells were suddenly uncertain that they'd be able to wash their dishes or flush their toilets.

Maybe they should use litter boxes instead.

Litter boxes make terrible dishwashers.


Yup. Anything can be a litter box if you're brave enough. A dishwasher, otoh? Notsomuch.
 
2022-07-05 6:21:44 PM  
I believe Phoenix is the fastest growing large city. And I also believe the people moving there are insane, ignorant, or really short-sighted. Enjoy the next couple of decades.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-07-05 6:25:53 PM  

KRSESQ: Trainspotr: Klyukva: Homeowners who didn't have wells were suddenly uncertain that they'd be able to wash their dishes or flush their toilets.

Maybe they should use litter boxes instead.

Litter boxes make terrible dishwashers.

That's what dogs are for.


Wow. You really are brave. If I ever tried that with my dog, he'd have bit me. For sure.
 
2022-07-05 6:29:03 PM  

pheelix: Fun fact: Brown Recluse spiders native to Arizona carry a tiny violin on their back.
[Fark user image 760x480]
/Allow me to play the song of my people


So far this thread is doing a bang-up job of reassuring me that living in a place where the wind makes my face hurt in the winter is a good thing.
 
2022-07-05 6:29:49 PM  
If you're in the second decade of a drought, that's just your normal climate now.
 
2022-07-05 6:31:04 PM  
Only stupid people move to where you can't get water. Let these people argue with idiot farmers who think they should be able to have UNLIMITED WATER.
 
2022-07-05 6:31:49 PM  

Mock26: [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/jtxew5XUVbQ] This is definitely worth watching.


Saw that the other night, had no idea the Utah was the biggest offender, and I loved that their answer to the problem was to literally pray for rain-hahaha, good luck with that.
 
2022-07-05 6:34:29 PM  

Klyukva: Homeowners who didn't have wells were suddenly uncertain that they'd be able to wash their dishes or flush their toilets.

Maybe they should use litter boxes instead.


Nah, litter boxes are for them commie librul schools! Kids dressed as furries, "identifying" as cats, and demanding a litter box in every classroom!!!
 
2022-07-05 6:34:50 PM  
It's been building up for a while here. The whole "wildcat subdivision" thing means that there are thousands and thousands of homes in the deserts that have no real assured water supply.  A lot of them are hauling water. Then there's the "you must prove you have a 100 year assured water supply to build a subdivision" thing. They've allowed a lot of creative accounting on that front for a long time because god forbid a silly thing like that get in the way of developers making a fat profit throwing up stucco monster subdivisions. Our residential water use here tends to be very efficient in the cities, but there's just the sheer number of homes going up combined with a dwindling water supply (oh, and pools, so many pools.) Add in agricultural and mining water usage and welp, that's where the majority of the water goes there, but we can't do anything that would cost those job creators money, now, can we? I've lived in Arizona since I was 1. I have no water intensive landscaping at all. I don't leave the water running when I brush my teeth. We don't have a pool. Most long term residents are like us - water is life, don't waste it.

Meanwhile, the Colorado is in bad shape. Very bad shape. I honestly don't see how they save Lake Powell. It's currently down 20 feet over this time last year... and this time last year it was down 50 feet over the year before. It's 160 feet below full pool. The lake has gone up close to 18 feet from its low this year, which is a very bad sign because the spring runoff inflows look to have stopped for the year. It's at 3539' elevation right now, and at 3490' they can't produce power. After that point they have to release water via the river outlet works, which was not designed for sustained usage. This past winter it was down to 3522'. There are a lot of very nervous people in the Page, AZ area because of all of this. If it falls at the same rate that it has over the past year, it's going to be VERY close to that 3490' mark. If we don't have multiple years of well above average snowfall combined with usage cuts, Glen Canyon Dam may need to be bypassed. Keep in mind that the canyons that make up Powell are V-shaped, so the lower the water level gets, the narrower the lake gets, so levels will drop faster.  The solution they've been trying to work towards to help the farmers out is drilling more wells for groundwater... umm, I don't think you've thought your cunning plan through there, water managers.
 
2022-07-05 6:35:19 PM  
Something is going to give, and it's not just going to be people in AZ upset they can't build a mansion in the desert with fountains and pools


Land is sinking as groundwater levels drop. New research shows how California could fix it | Associated Press | lancasterfarming.com
 
2022-07-05 6:39:31 PM  
Let them wear stillsuits
 
2022-07-05 6:40:27 PM  
My biggest problem now is trying to keep water OUTSIDE the house.
 
2022-07-05 6:41:53 PM  
My biggest fear of moving is not having access to fresh water.  I live about a mile from the Mississippi, and that does not show any signs of reduction due to it being a "working" river and it being too expensive and unfeasible to create a pipeline that diverts water UPHILL towards the continental divide

and btw I am outside the flood plain.  unlike some stupid recent developments
 
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