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(Fark)   Does anyone have network punch down suggestions? This should not be as freaking frustrating as it is, and subby would truly appreciate suggestions (Tag is for me so far)   (fark.com) divider line
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225 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 05 Jul 2022 at 6:35 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-07-05 3:40:08 PM  
I assume you're referring to wiring terminations and not troll smacking?

fiber-optic-transceiver-module.comView Full Size


110 Block.

As old school as it gets, but still works for Cat 6 terminations.

/lawn, please remove yourself from it.
 
2022-07-05 4:12:54 PM  
Even if those network nerds deserve it, don't punch down. Always punch up, it's just better comedy.
 
2022-07-05 4:13:30 PM  
I'm not as fluent in Geek as I once was.  Can someone translate this to English?
 
2022-07-05 4:19:43 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


/it's a tarp!
 
2022-07-05 4:33:56 PM  

bluorangefyre: I'm not as fluent in Geek as I once was.  Can someone translate this to English?


The tool pictured above. It presses wires down onto contacts which cut through the insulation into the copper core. Used for telephones and network cables.
 
2022-07-05 5:20:33 PM  
They also make useful little palm sized tools for handling the key stones for wall boxes while terminating. Or, depending on how your specific setup (a patch panel that uses keystone for example instead of straight cable, this nifty tool.

https://www.network-supply.com/All-in-One-Punch-Down-Tool
 
2022-07-05 6:38:17 PM  

brax33: They also make useful little palm sized tools for handling the key stones for wall boxes while terminating. Or, depending on how your specific setup (a patch panel that uses keystone for example instead of straight cable, this nifty tool.

https://www.network-supply.com/All-in-One-Punch-Down-Tool


I have something similar, which works pretty well. Only problem is that it's proprietary to a specific Panduit keystone terminal, so I can only buy those. 😉 Still nice to have.
 
2022-07-05 6:46:08 PM  

bluorangefyre: I'm not as fluent in Geek as I once was.  Can someone translate this to English?


The tool up top. It inserts the wire into a patch panel or wall (keystone jack), and has a blade attachment to snip the extra wire.
 
2022-07-05 6:55:24 PM  
OK, so subby here... I don't do this kind of network stuff but once every 2-3 years, and I'd love personal tips and tricks on the punchdown and testing.

#1. How do I actually get these cables and wires into the sockets on the patch panel. Yes, I have big hands, but not Andre the Giant hands. It's an exiting run, so I'm working with stuff in the way, but it can't be THIS hard, or we'd only have dainty little 16 year old Asian girls do it. So anyone have tips on where to start? (One end or the other, start in the middle, start on each end and work to the middle, etc), and how I keep the wires in the little socket while I am reaching down to get the punchdown tool. So yeah, tips on how to keep them in place, how I could possibly set it up so I reach everything (It would be great if I could just take the whole thing apart like up top, but that won't work.). Like I said, I can't be the only one with these issues, so I have to be doing somethign wrong.

#2. I have a tester, a Fluke MicroMapper. It's nice, but I have no idea what the lights actually mean. The ones that identify the wire pairs, that is. At the moment, if there's a fault, I rewire everything all over again because my wires are colored, not numbered. :-) I just don't know what it actually means when it says, for example, that I have a problem with wires 1-2 or 3-6, and so on. I know different tools are different, but I'm not finding a good summary of the basics of these. Once again, any help here would be greatly appreciated. I already threw my punchdown tool across the server room in frustration. :-)
Fluke Networks MT-8200-49A, MicroMapper Unknown-Volt Lcd Circuit Analyzer (Battery Included) in the Test Meters department at Lowes.com

distrelec.bizView Full Size


Thanks guys, and if I was unclear, please let me know. It's been a long week today, so I may have glossed over something.
 
2022-07-05 6:56:05 PM  

Mikey1969: bluorangefyre: I'm not as fluent in Geek as I once was.  Can someone translate this to English?

The tool up top. It inserts the wire into a patch panel or wall (keystone jack), and has a blade attachment to snip the extra wire.


LOL, I missed the explanation up top for this. Pretty much exactly what I typed.
 
2022-07-05 7:06:25 PM  

Mikey1969: #1. How do I actually get these cables and wires into the sockets on the patch panel.


The 110 punch tool does all the work.  It has a springy snapping action that forces the wire down between two metal tabs, causing the insulation to be cut, making contact.  One side of the punch tool has a sharp side which clips off the excess as you complete the punch cycle.  Usually two or three punches are all it takes to terminate a single wire.

Mikey1969: #2. I have a tester, a Fluke MicroMapper.


That's used to validate that the wiring as installed matches the Cat 6 Ethernet standard.  It'll show if the RX and TX pairs are correctly pinned out to prevent crosstalk between the pairs, etc.  Generally it's used to trace an existing jack back to a patch panel, and then test the wiring to make sure it'll work with an Ethernet device. 

Just google the wiring connections for Cat 6 or Cat 5e depending on what you're doing, follow the color pairs, and you should be good to go.

Good luck.  We're all counting on you.
 
2022-07-05 7:09:50 PM  

Mikey1969: OK, so subby here... I don't do this kind of network stuff but once every 2-3 years, and I'd love personal tips and tricks on the punchdown and testing.

#1. How do I actually get these cables and wires into the sockets on the patch panel. Yes, I have big hands, but not Andre the Giant hands. It's an exiting run, so I'm working with stuff in the way, but it can't be THIS hard, or we'd only have dainty little 16 year old Asian girls do it. So anyone have tips on where to start? (One end or the other, start in the middle, start on each end and work to the middle, etc), and how I keep the wires in the little socket while I am reaching down to get the punchdown tool. So yeah, tips on how to keep them in place, how I could possibly set it up so I reach everything (It would be great if I could just take the whole thing apart like up top, but that won't work.). Like I said, I can't be the only one with these issues, so I have to be doing somethign wrong.

#2. I have a tester, a Fluke MicroMapper. It's nice, but I have no idea what the lights actually mean. The ones that identify the wire pairs, that is. At the moment, if there's a fault, I rewire everything all over again because my wires are colored, not numbered. :-) I just don't know what it actually means when it says, for example, that I have a problem with wires 1-2 or 3-6, and so on. I know different tools are different, but I'm not finding a good summary of the basics of these. Once again, any help here would be greatly appreciated. I already threw my punchdown tool across the server room in frustration. :-)
Fluke Networks MT-8200-49A, MicroMapper Unknown-Volt Lcd Circuit Analyzer (Battery Included) in the Test Meters department at Lowes.com

[distrelec.biz image 300x400]

Thanks guys, and if I was unclear, please let me know. It's been a long week today, so I may have glossed over something.


So, you're gonna want to grab a quick copy of the T568A and B wiring charts, like this, so you can tell which wire colour is which on the tester
th.bing.comView Full Size


Then, grab a 110 punchdown tool (fairly common at home despot or similar), try to splurge for one with the little foldout hook and flathead in the back of the tool (or cheap out like I did on my first one and get a mini version).

Strip the wires, lay them with a bit of extra stripped wire on the punch block, and punch them in, cutting the extra wire off in one go.  Match the diagrams, confirm with the tester, and you should be all set
 
2022-07-05 7:11:56 PM  

markie_farkie: I assume you're referring to wiring terminations and not troll smacking?

[fiber-optic-transceiver-module.com image 650x428]

110 Block.

As old school as it gets, but still works for Cat 6 terminations.

/lawn, please remove yourself from it.


Now that block is pretty, since it has the pinout actually printed on it.  None of mine ever have it.

At least poor Mikey isn't punching down into a BIX.  less wires, but less likely to have the right tool
 
2022-07-05 7:13:24 PM  
The pairs are (kinda) numbered
8 7 4 2 1 3 5 6on an RJ45 per those LEDs.
The connector pin numbers do something else
 
TWX
2022-07-05 7:30:28 PM  

Mikey1969: OK, so subby here... I don't do this kind of network stuff but once every 2-3 years, and I'd love personal tips and tricks on the punchdown and testing.

#1. How do I actually get these cables and wires into the sockets on the patch panel. Yes, I have big hands, but not Andre the Giant hands. It's an exiting run, so I'm working with stuff in the way, but it can't be THIS hard, or we'd only have dainty little 16 year old Asian girls do it. So anyone have tips on where to start? (One end or the other, start in the middle, start on each end and work to the middle, etc), and how I keep the wires in the little socket while I am reaching down to get the punchdown tool. So yeah, tips on how to keep them in place, how I could possibly set it up so I reach everything (It would be great if I could just take the whole thing apart like up top, but that won't work.). Like I said, I can't be the only one with these issues, so I have to be doing somethign wrong.

#2. I have a tester, a Fluke MicroMapper. It's nice, but I have no idea what the lights actually mean. The ones that identify the wire pairs, that is. At the moment, if there's a fault, I rewire everything all over again because my wires are colored, not numbered. :-) I just don't know what it actually means when it says, for example, that I have a problem with wires 1-2 or 3-6, and so on. I know different tools are different, but I'm not finding a good summary of the basics of these. Once again, any help here would be greatly appreciated. I already threw my punchdown tool across the server room in frustration. :-)
Fluke Networks MT-8200-49A, MicroMapper Unknown-Volt Lcd Circuit Analyzer (Battery Included) in the Test Meters department at Lowes.com

[distrelec.biz image 300x400]

Thanks guys, and if I was unclear, please let me know. It's been a long week today, so I may have glossed over something.



I did this kind of work as a telecom infrastructure specialist for a few years before moving on to networking (ie switches and routers).  On the patch panel, if it's a preassembled one like this, cut yourself plenty of slack on the exposed wires under the outer jacket.  If there's a dividing + inside the cable, cut it as close to the jacket-end as possible, and cut the peel string at this point too.

Start with the two pairs in the center of the line of four pairs, do a sort of rotation/wiggle thing to make a gap to shove around the protruding blade (each pair has a point that sticks out in the divider) and push on far enough to just lightly hold, as close to where the jacket is trimmed as you can, as little exposed wire as possible.  Once the inner two pairs are done, (2nd pair WH-GR and 3rd pair WH-OR on a T568-B color pattern) do the outer two pairs (1st par WH-BL and 4th pair WH-BR) in the same fashion, but don't untwist closer to the jacket-end than you need.  If there's two or three twists before the 110-block that's fine on these outer two.

When you lay the wires into the block, lay the jacketed part towards the center.  So port 1 would be from below, port 2 would be from above, etc.  Pin 1 on a four-pair cable that's a white binder group is white-blue, then solid blue is twisted with it, etc.

Once they're all laid in, make sure your cutting bit is oriented properly (ie don't cut the cable off and leave just the trimmings on the panel!  Ask me how I know!) and punch them down, angling so that you're sure that the cut-side contacts the block to ensure a good trim.

Some really skilled techs can lay-out many data drops and then punch them all in succession, but I never really did that myself.

If you're going to put on jacket labels (highly recommended) do it at least 6" from the jacket-end so that if you later have to repunch after trimming the cable down, you're not screwed.  Also if you can, leave yourself a service-loop/drip-loop so that if water ever wicks in on the cables it drips off to the floor, rather than into the patch panel to corrode it.  (again ask me how I know!)

For what it's worth, both ends should match.  If you punch T568B at the patch panel, punch T568B on the work area outlet (ie the jack).  Don't flip A/B unless you like making crossover cables.

As for punch tools, I like Klein for a non-impact tool (they have screwdriver/punch combo that's great) and Harris/Fluke 814 or 914 for an impact tool.

Good luck, we're all counting on you.
 
2022-07-05 8:05:27 PM  

Deathbymeteor: Mikey1969: OK, so subby here... I don't do this kind of network stuff but once every 2-3 years, and I'd love personal tips and tricks on the punchdown and testing.

#1. How do I actually get these cables and wires into the sockets on the patch panel. Yes, I have big hands, but not Andre the Giant hands. It's an exiting run, so I'm working with stuff in the way, but it can't be THIS hard, or we'd only have dainty little 16 year old Asian girls do it. So anyone have tips on where to start? (One end or the other, start in the middle, start on each end and work to the middle, etc), and how I keep the wires in the little socket while I am reaching down to get the punchdown tool. So yeah, tips on how to keep them in place, how I could possibly set it up so I reach everything (It would be great if I could just take the whole thing apart like up top, but that won't work.). Like I said, I can't be the only one with these issues, so I have to be doing somethign wrong.

#2. I have a tester, a Fluke MicroMapper. It's nice, but I have no idea what the lights actually mean. The ones that identify the wire pairs, that is. At the moment, if there's a fault, I rewire everything all over again because my wires are colored, not numbered. :-) I just don't know what it actually means when it says, for example, that I have a problem with wires 1-2 or 3-6, and so on. I know different tools are different, but I'm not finding a good summary of the basics of these. Once again, any help here would be greatly appreciated. I already threw my punchdown tool across the server room in frustration. :-)
Fluke Networks MT-8200-49A, MicroMapper Unknown-Volt Lcd Circuit Analyzer (Battery Included) in the Test Meters department at Lowes.com

[distrelec.biz image 300x400]

Thanks guys, and if I was unclear, please let me know. It's been a long week today, so I may have glossed over something.

So, you're gonna want to grab a quick copy of the T568A and B wiring charts, like this, so you can tell which wire colour is which on the tester
[th.bing.com image 474x248]

Then, grab a 110 punchdown tool (fairly common at home despot or similar), try to splurge for one with the little foldout hook and flathead in the back of the tool (or cheap out like I did on my first one and get a mini version).

Strip the wires, lay them with a bit of extra stripped wire on the punch block, and punch them in, cutting the extra wire off in one go.  Match the diagrams, confirm with the tester, and you should be all set


Those numbered diagrams are going to help immensely. 😁 Thank you!
 
2022-07-05 8:08:33 PM  

TWX: Mikey1969: OK, so subby here... I don't do this kind of network stuff but once every 2-3 years, and I'd love personal tips and tricks on the punchdown and testing.

#1. How do I actually get these cables and wires into the sockets on the patch panel. Yes, I have big hands, but not Andre the Giant hands. It's an exiting run, so I'm working with stuff in the way, but it can't be THIS hard, or we'd only have dainty little 16 year old Asian girls do it. So anyone have tips on where to start? (One end or the other, start in the middle, start on each end and work to the middle, etc), and how I keep the wires in the little socket while I am reaching down to get the punchdown tool. So yeah, tips on how to keep them in place, how I could possibly set it up so I reach everything (It would be great if I could just take the whole thing apart like up top, but that won't work.). Like I said, I can't be the only one with these issues, so I have to be doing somethign wrong.

#2. I have a tester, a Fluke MicroMapper. It's nice, but I have no idea what the lights actually mean. The ones that identify the wire pairs, that is. At the moment, if there's a fault, I rewire everything all over again because my wires are colored, not numbered. :-) I just don't know what it actually means when it says, for example, that I have a problem with wires 1-2 or 3-6, and so on. I know different tools are different, but I'm not finding a good summary of the basics of these. Once again, any help here would be greatly appreciated. I already threw my punchdown tool across the server room in frustration. :-)
Fluke Networks MT-8200-49A, MicroMapper Unknown-Volt Lcd Circuit Analyzer (Battery Included) in the Test Meters department at Lowes.com

[distrelec.biz image 300x400]

Thanks guys, and if I was unclear, please let me know. It's been a long week today, so I may have glossed over something.


I did this kind of work as a telecom infrastructure specialist for a few years before moving on to networking (ie switches and routers).  On the patch panel, if it's a preassembled one like this, cut yourself plenty of slack on the exposed wires under the outer jacket.  If there's a dividing + inside the cable, cut it as close to the jacket-end as possible, and cut the peel string at this point too.

Start with the two pairs in the center of the line of four pairs, do a sort of rotation/wiggle thing to make a gap to shove around the protruding blade (each pair has a point that sticks out in the divider) and push on far enough to just lightly hold, as close to where the jacket is trimmed as you can, as little exposed wire as possible.  Once the inner two pairs are done, (2nd pair WH-GR and 3rd pair WH-OR on a T568-B color pattern) do the outer two pairs (1st par WH-BL and 4th pair WH-BR) in the same fashion, but don't untwist closer to the jacket-end than you need.  If there's two or three twists before the 110-block that's fine on these outer two.

When you lay the wires into the block, lay the jacketed part towards the center.  So port 1 would be from below, port 2 would be from above, etc.  Pin 1 on a four-pair cable that's a white binder group is white-blue, then solid blue is twisted with it, etc.

Once they're all laid in, make sure your cutting bit is oriented properly (ie don't cut the cable off and leave just the trimmings on the panel!  Ask me how I know!) and punch them down, angling so that you're sure that the cut-side contacts the block to ensure a good trim.

Some really skilled techs can lay-out many data drops and then punch them all in succession, but I never really did that myself.

If you're going to put on jacket labels (highly recommended) do it at least 6" from the jacket-end so that if you later have to repunch after trimming the cable down, you're not screwed.  Also if you can, leave yourself a service-loop/drip-loop so that if water ever wicks in on the cables it drips off to the floor, rather than into the patch panel to corrode it.  (again ask me how I know!)

For what it's worth, both ends should match.  If you punch T568B at the patch panel, punch T568B on the work area outlet (ie the jack).  Don't flip A/B unless you like making crossover cables.

As for punch tools, I like Klein for a non-impact tool (they have screwdriver/punch combo that's great) and Harris/Fluke 814 or 914 for an impact tool.

Good luck, we're all counting on you.


This is great. Thanks for the tips on punching down, that was what I needed. I knew not to unwind too much, but I never really thought about how critical it would be surrounded by all of the EM energy thrown around by every other connection and the rest of the equipment in the set ver room. 😁

Now I have help on both topics, so I appreciate the help in this. It was making me a tad stabby.
 
2022-07-05 9:03:18 PM  
As long as we're on the topic, I am going to be ordering some CAT6 keystone jacks in the next week or so to wire my soon-to be finished basement, and I was thinking of these Cable Matters ones that come with the matching holder.  I was planning to just get a cheap tool to go with it.

If anyone has any alternate suggestions, I'm all ears.  Never done punch-down before.

Already installed the 16 port patch panel and a 16 port unmanaged switch in a 6U rackmount and ran all my existing wires to keystone couplers because it didn't seem worth the trouble of reterminating them.  It's a nice looking setup mounted under my stairs where my WFH desk currently is.

I taught my 9 year old to terminate cables in the process, which was fun.
 
2022-07-05 9:07:17 PM  
I'm looking forward to your next cabling thread after the job goes fiber instead of copper.

Don't ask me about thick net, that was ugly.
 
2022-07-05 9:15:42 PM  

BMFPitt: I was thinking of these Cable Matters ones that come with the matching holder.


Looks like every day, real world, RJ45 gear.

I was surprised by Black / Blue / White / Orange / Green / Purple / Red / Graywith Brown going away which is a very reasonable step as most wire jockeys are guys and guys often have less than optimal color vision.
 
2022-07-05 9:49:40 PM  

2wolves: BMFPitt: I was thinking of these Cable Matters ones that come with the matching holder.

Looks like every day, real world, RJ45 gear.

I was surprised by Black / Blue / White / Orange / Green / Purple / Red / Graywith Brown going away which is a very reasonable step as most wire jockeys are guys and guys often have less than optimal color vision.


I see some cables where the brown and the orange are FAR too close in tint. I mean, you add brown to make orange, but it should be a really bright orange.
 
2022-07-05 9:53:35 PM  

BMFPitt: As long as we're on the topic, I am going to be ordering some CAT6 keystone jacks in the next week or so to wire my soon-to be finished basement, and I was thinking of these Cable Matters ones that come with the matching holder.  I was planning to just get a cheap tool to go with it.

If anyone has any alternate suggestions, I'm all ears.  Never done punch-down before.

Already installed the 16 port patch panel and a 16 port unmanaged switch in a 6U rackmount and ran all my existing wires to keystone couplers because it didn't seem worth the trouble of reterminating them.  It's a nice looking setup mounted under my stairs where my WFH desk currently is.

I taught my 9 year old to terminate cables in the process, which was fun.


This is nice... A little pricey and needs specific keystone jacks, but nice. You just barely stick the cable in each opening, put the jack in, and squeeze. Everything is nice and tight, and it cuts the wires nice and clean. It's like the one thing that I knew how to do correctly when I made this thread... 🤣 It takes all of the thinking out of it, really...
 
2022-07-05 9:54:01 PM  

Mikey1969: BMFPitt: As long as we're on the topic, I am going to be ordering some CAT6 keystone jacks in the next week or so to wire my soon-to be finished basement, and I was thinking of these Cable Matters ones that come with the matching holder.  I was planning to just get a cheap tool to go with it.

If anyone has any alternate suggestions, I'm all ears.  Never done punch-down before.

Already installed the 16 port patch panel and a 16 port unmanaged switch in a 6U rackmount and ran all my existing wires to keystone couplers because it didn't seem worth the trouble of reterminating them.  It's a nice looking setup mounted under my stairs where my WFH desk currently is.

I taught my 9 year old to terminate cables in the process, which was fun.

This is nice... A little pricey and needs specific keystone jacks, but nice. You just barely stick the cable in each opening, put the jack in, and squeeze. Everything is nice and tight, and it cuts the wires nice and clean. It's like the one thing that I knew how to do correctly when I made this thread... 🤣 It takes all of the thinking out of it, really...


A link would help, no?

https://www.amazon.com/Fluke-Networks-JR-PAN-2-JackRapid-Termination/dp/B002DUCYWW/ref=asc_df_B002DUCYWW/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=312070574797&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=1372279279073082389&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=m&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9029746&hvtargid=pla-462853076844&psc=1
 
TWX
2022-07-05 10:30:30 PM  

Mikey1969: Mikey1969: BMFPitt: As long as we're on the topic, I am going to be ordering some CAT6 keystone jacks in the next week or so to wire my soon-to be finished basement, and I was thinking of these Cable Matters ones that come with the matching holder.  I was planning to just get a cheap tool to go with it.

If anyone has any alternate suggestions, I'm all ears.  Never done punch-down before.

Already installed the 16 port patch panel and a 16 port unmanaged switch in a 6U rackmount and ran all my existing wires to keystone couplers because it didn't seem worth the trouble of reterminating them.  It's a nice looking setup mounted under my stairs where my WFH desk currently is.

I taught my 9 year old to terminate cables in the process, which was fun.

This is nice... A little pricey and needs specific keystone jacks, but nice. You just barely stick the cable in each opening, put the jack in, and squeeze. Everything is nice and tight, and it cuts the wires nice and clean. It's like the one thing that I knew how to do correctly when I made this thread... 🤣 It takes all of the thinking out of it, really...

A link would help, no?

https://www.amazon.com/Fluke-Networks-JR-PAN-2-JackRapid-Termination/dp/B002DUCYWW/ref=asc_df_B002DUCYWW/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=312070574797&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=1372279279073082389&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=m&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9029746&hvtargid=pla-462853076844&psc=1


I messed up my reply.  dang it.

skip the jack rapid unless you're doing a LOT of jacks.  Like hundreds.  The tools are fragile, you mis-align the vendor-specific jack into the particular die then the die will break.

vendor-generic puck:

Fark user imageView Full Size


Leviton-specific puck:

Fark user imageView Full Size


This will hold the jack so you can lay your wires into it and punch it down without hurting your hand, or the wall, or the desk, or your leg, etc.
Nowadays I do little enough termination that I use a non-impact punch:
Fark user imageView Full Size
I managed to find a #3/slot bit to replace the #1/slot bit.  It was very rare that I needed the #1 philips.  Rack equipment is nearly all #2 or #3, so having #2 and #3 makes more sense.This is what I carry and use to strip the jacket:
Fark user imageView Full Size
I spin the cable against the serrated blade and it scores the jacket enough to let me break the jacket free.  Works best on a plenum-rated cable beause those have stiff jackets, works OK on riser-rated.  If it's CM o CMG, you might actually want a stripper, but I didn't find it necessary.
 
TWX
2022-07-05 10:34:12 PM  

2wolves: BMFPitt: I was thinking of these Cable Matters ones that come with the matching holder.

Looks like every day, real world, RJ45 gear.

I was surprised by Black / Blue / White / Orange / Green / Purple / Red / Graywith Brown going away which is a very reasonable step as most wire jockeys are guys and guys often have less than optimal color vision.


i.ytimg.comView Full Size


this is why it's not blue-white, orange-white, but is actually white-blue, white-orange, etc, because the next group is red-blue, red-orange, etc, followed by black-blue, black-orange etc.

Fiber uses just individual strands, so blue, orange, green, brown, slate, white, red, black yellow, violet, adding next pink and aqua.  A 24-strand cable will then start over, but with a stripe on the strands if within the same buffer tube.  The buffer tubes are themselves color-coded in the same pattern, and sometimes a bigger series of jackets will then enclose those with the same colors.
 
2022-07-06 12:53:40 AM  

Mikey1969: 2wolves: BMFPitt: I was thinking of these Cable Matters ones that come with the matching holder.

Looks like every day, real world, RJ45 gear.

I was surprised by Black / Blue / White / Orange / Green / Purple / Red / Graywith Brown going away which is a very reasonable step as most wire jockeys are guys and guys often have less than optimal color vision.

I see some cables where the brown and the orange are FAR too close in tint. I mean, you add brown to make orange, but it should be a really bright orange.


Yeah, that can be an issue, esp if you, like me, are color blind. Better light often helps.

Just finished terminating the network cables in my son's new house (they were run, but not terminated). Color code goes Blue (1st pair), Org, Grn, Brn, (Slate is not used in a 4 pair cable) and use the 568B wiring (most panels do), though if you use 568A at both ends, it won't matter. "Bell Operators Give Better Service" is the mnemonic to remember the sequence. 568B on an RJ45 plug goes Wht/Org, Org/W, W/Grn, Blu/W, W/Blu, Grn/W, W/Brn, Brn/W, from left to right with the tab down. First color is the "major" one, i.e.v the predominant color of the wire, second color is the stripe. The wire colors alternate "color" and "white" down the plug. You will get pretty good at it by the end of the day.

I bought a $17 set of tools off Amazon which was enough to do the RJ45s, and check the completed run. 110 blocks are denser and more popular, but I have gigE running through some 66 blocks at home and it works just fine for short runs.

I have a bunch of 110 RJ45 patch panels salvaged from work when they rewired. You can get them cheap or free  sometimes if there's an office building being rewired. Otherwise, theyre plentiful on the web.
 
2022-07-06 12:56:07 AM  
Also, watch some youtube videos to get the hang of it, and the tricks of the trade...
 
2022-07-06 12:58:20 AM  

BMFPitt: As long as we're on the topic, I am going to be ordering some CAT6 keystone jacks in the next week or so to wire my soon-to be finished basement, and I was thinking of these Cable Matters ones that come with the matching holder.  I was planning to just get a cheap tool to go with it.

If anyone has any alternate suggestions, I'm all ears.  Never done punch-down before.

Already installed the 16 port patch panel and a 16 port unmanaged switch in a 6U rackmount and ran all my existing wires to keystone couplers because it didn't seem worth the trouble of reterminating them.  It's a nice looking setup mounted under my stairs where my WFH desk currently is.

I taught my 9 year old to terminate cables in the process, which was fun.


That'll work just fine. Patch panels rock.
 
2022-07-06 1:03:54 AM  
Amazon tool kit I bought. Cheap, but did the job
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B088LWSTTB?psc=1&ref=ppx_pop_mob_b_asin_image

The little cable tester alone is worth the cost.
media-amazon.comView Full Size
 
2022-07-06 4:11:22 AM  
i love it when you talk technical up in here. gets me nipples hard.
 
2022-07-06 4:29:06 AM  

sinko swimo: i love it when you talk technical up in here. gets me nipples hard.


How you doin'?

/s
 
2022-07-06 10:38:34 AM  

TWX: Imessed up my reply.  dang it.

skip the jack rapid unless you're doing a LOT of jacks.  Like hundreds.  The tools are fragile, you mis-align the vendor-specific jack into the particular die then the die will break.

vendor-generic puck:

Leviton-specific puck:

This will hold the jack so you can lay your wires into it and punch it down without hurting your hand, or the wall, or the desk, or your leg, etc.
Nowadays I do little enough termination that I use a non-impact punch:I managed to find a #3/slot bit to replace the #1/slot bit.  It was very rare that I needed the #1 philips.  Rack equipment is nearly all #2 or #3, so having #2 and #3 makes more sense.This is what I carry and use to strip the jacket:I spin the cable against the serrated blade and it scores the jacket enough to let me break the jacket free.  Works best on a plenum-rated cable beause those have stiff jackets, works OK on riser-rated.  If it's CM o CMG, you might actually want a stripper, but I didn't find it necessary.


Interesting. Didn't know that about that tool. I can see where you're coming from, though. Occasionally, if I don't align things correctly, it isn't as smooth, so that misalignment thing makes sense.

For stripping, I have one of these. I don't use anything but the one for stripping the main jacket, and the cutter tool, but those work great. I just have to keep an eve on the blade adjustment, since some seem to have thinner jackets. I'll have it adjusted for one cable, go to strip the other (They used the end run of like 3 boxes of Cat 5 for these runs. All full runs, but no two of the same cable manufacturer...), and I nick the wires underneath, so I snip the end off and do  it again. Gonna check out those tools you posted. I really like that screwdriver/punchdown tool you posted. 
encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.comView Full Size
 
2022-07-06 10:49:38 AM  
Oh, and thank you for all of the feed back and tips! This is going to help.
 
2022-07-06 11:18:30 AM  

Mikey1969: For stripping, I have one of these. I don't use anything but the one for stripping the main jacket, and the cutter tool, but those work great. I just have to keep an eve on the blade adjustment, since some seem to have thinner jackets. I'll have it adjusted for one cable, go to strip the other (They used the end run of like 3 boxes of Cat 5 for these runs. All full runs, but no two of the same cable manufacturer...), and I nick the wires underneath, so I snip the end off and do  it again. Gonna check out those tools you posted. I really like that screwdriver/punchdown tool you posted. 
[encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com image 256x197]


I just upgraded to this crimping tool.  The pull-through makes things a lot easier than trying to cut the wires to be perfectly even.
 
2022-07-06 11:53:23 AM  

BMFPitt: Mikey1969: For stripping, I have one of these. I don't use anything but the one for stripping the main jacket, and the cutter tool, but those work great. I just have to keep an eve on the blade adjustment, since some seem to have thinner jackets. I'll have it adjusted for one cable, go to strip the other (They used the end run of like 3 boxes of Cat 5 for these runs. All full runs, but no two of the same cable manufacturer...), and I nick the wires underneath, so I snip the end off and do  it again. Gonna check out those tools you posted. I really like that screwdriver/punchdown tool you posted. 
[encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com image 256x197]

I just upgraded to this crimping tool.  The pull-through makes things a lot easier than trying to cut the wires to be perfectly even.


I just saw these pass-thru connectors recently. They work well? I agree, laying out the wires and trying to cut them even is a pain in the ass. :-)

Is it a ratcheting tool? Because I've over-crimped these before, and the ratcheting tool was exactly the upgrade I needed to break that bad habit.
 
TWX
2022-07-06 10:29:54 PM  

Mikey1969: Interesting. Didn't know that about that tool. I can see where you're coming from, though. Occasionally, if I don't align things correctly, it isn't as smooth, so that misalignment thing makes sense.

For stripping, I have one of these. I don't use anything but the one for stripping the main jacket, and the cutter tool, but those work great. I just have to keep an eve on the blade adjustment, since some seem to have thinner jackets. I'll have it adjusted for one cable, go to strip the other (They used the end run of like 3 boxes of Cat 5 for these runs. All full runs, but no two of the same cable manufacturer...), and I nick the wires underneath, so I snip the end off and do it again. Gonna check out those tools you posted. I really like that screwdriver/punchdown tool you posted.


If you do want the impact function, Fluke/Harris has a screwdriver bit that goes in the D914.  But I don't suggest it for rack/unrack, I had a coworker who broke the impact tool because he tried to unrack a switch that was tightened down too tight.

One other trick, if you leave yourself a drip-loop then you can sometimes take a mounted patch panel, demount it from the rack, flip it over so that the 110-blocks face you, and then terminate it so long as there's somewhere for the cable slack to go.  But obviously be careful if you do this, so that you don't end up causing open connections by accident.

As for terminating, I prefer to bring cables in from the low-numbered side of the patch panel row, so that I'm not having to pull later cables over the top of existing ones.  More modern patch panels use crossbars that attach at the back so that the cables come straight out from the blocks, but sometimes those are more trouble than they're worth.

When you punch down an outlet/jack at the other end, if it's a kind like this:

Fark user imageView Full Size


start with the blue pair.  Basically work your way up from the back end towards the front.

As for the patch panel end, I'm a big fan of these:

Fark user imageView Full Size


These take jacks just like the work area side.  This lets one mix a variety of cable types (basically anything that snaps into a quickport/keystone form factor) so that one isn't limited as newer cable standards come out.  If one goes Cat5e or Cat6 now, but later needs Cat6a for a multigigabit application like a modern WAP, or down the road even needs newer standards yet then there aren't numerous partial patch panels in place with unused jacks.

I had even gotten to the point I was calling out having the last, partly-used patch panel replaced with one of these, with existing cables reterminated into quickport jacks, if it had less than 12 ports used.  That allowed me to go modular for all further expansion, so a building could have new Cat6a drops pulled in as desired even if the rack was pretty full.

I guess I stopped carrying the outer jacket stripper because I was already carrying the multitool.  If I couldn't get my fingers down in to push the strands into the punch block I could use the pliers to do it, so I already had the knife with me.  I had even considered buying one of the mil-spec EOD multitools and taking the detonator spike and grinding it into a 110-block punch shape so I could use that multitool to punch down too, but never got that far.
 
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