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(CBC)   That's a big ass tree   (cbc.ca) divider line
    More: Cool, Tree, western red cedar, tree's diameter, Diameter at breast height, Thomas's preliminary measurements, red cedars, Vancouver, North Vancouver  
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1405 clicks; posted to STEM » on 05 Jul 2022 at 5:15 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



30 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-07-05 3:00:07 AM  
static.boredpanda.comView Full Size
 
2022-07-05 4:51:30 AM  
Neat
 
2022-07-05 4:56:02 AM  
I'm nearly 50 or 100 years old.
 
2022-07-05 5:51:27 AM  
If Thomas's preliminary measurements are correct, the behemoth in Lynn Headwaters Regional Park would barely fit inside the cabin of a Boeing 747.

After that harsh evaluation, that tree's dreams of one day becoming a flight attendant have been dashed.
 
2022-07-05 6:35:22 AM  
Oblig.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-07-05 6:37:24 AM  
A western red cedar growing in a remote part of North Vancouver's Lynn Headwaters Regional Park is estimated to be between 4.8-5.8 metres in diameter, depending on the method used to calculate diameter at breast height (DBH). (Submitted by Colin Spratt)

How does one calculate diameter at breast height?
 
2022-07-05 6:58:46 AM  

BumpInTheNight: A western red cedar growing in a remote part of North Vancouver's Lynn Headwaters Regional Park is estimated to be between 4.8-5.8 metres in diameter, depending on the method used to calculate diameter at breast height (DBH). (Submitted by Colin Spratt)

How does one calculate diameter at breast height?


groovyhistory.comView Full Size


Bitterly and scornfully.
 
2022-07-05 7:00:16 AM  
FTA: The western red cedar found in Lynn Headwaters Regional Park is likely 1,000 to 2,000 years old, say experts

Let's cut it and find out.

/for science!
 
2022-07-05 7:11:05 AM  

Raider_dad: Oblig.

[Fark user image 500x342]


I'm thinking of creating a Fark alt named "I Have An XKCD for That"
 
2022-07-05 7:45:06 AM  
How come in the second picture, it looks like a 20' high stump with a normal tree in the background?
 
2022-07-05 9:18:36 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-07-05 9:21:36 AM  
So it was #4 in terms of recorded sizes?  When were numbers 1 thru 3 cut down?
 
2022-07-05 9:58:09 AM  

bearded clamorer: If Thomas's preliminary measurements are correct, the behemoth in Lynn Headwaters Regional Park would barely fit inside the cabin of a Boeing 747.

After that harsh evaluation, that tree's dreams of one day becoming a flight attendant have been dashed.


Barely fits still fits.
 
2022-07-05 10:24:50 AM  
What's the conversion rate of Football Fields to Boeing 747 Cabins?
 
2022-07-05 10:25:33 AM  
Now we're measuring things in 747 cabin widths. What the fark is wrong with people?
 
2022-07-05 10:28:25 AM  

toetag: How come in the second picture, it looks like a 20' high stump with a normal tree in the background?


Fark user imageView Full Size


because it's nearly dead?

"Because red cedars hollow as they age, it's often impossible to count their inner rings like other trees.
...

Based on photographs, said Guy, the tree appears unhealthy, a phenomenon he said is increasingly common in B.C.

"Red cedar has been showing more signs of distress in recent years than other ... species in times of drought," he said. "Which is probably climate change-related. So I guess another thing about these trees is they remind us they've been through a lot - but they might not get through the next hundred years or so.""

it seems the tree has hollowed out and much of the top part collapsed, perhaps leaving only a small part of the top with living greenery? that, or they just get a weird growth pattern when they are very old? here's another tree of the same species....

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-07-05 11:28:15 AM  

Russ1642: Now we're measuring things in 747 cabin widths. What the fark is wrong with people?


Which cabin? Model? Upper/lower? Forward or rear? It's not a finite thing.
 
2022-07-05 11:32:21 AM  

edmo: Russ1642: Now we're measuring things in 747 cabin widths. What the fark is wrong with people?

Which cabin? Model? Upper/lower? Forward or rear? It's not a finite thing.


And it's something few people have experience with, like olympic swimming pools or Rhode Island.
 
2022-07-05 12:35:06 PM  

luna1580: the top part collapsed


I hate when that happens
preview.redd.itView Full Size
 
2022-07-05 12:35:56 PM  

toetag: How come in the second picture, it looks like a 20' high stump with a normal tree in the background?


It does appear to lack any photosynthesising parts.
 
2022-07-05 12:40:46 PM  

flondrix: toetag: How come in the second picture, it looks like a 20' high stump with a normal tree in the background?

It does appear to lack any photosynthesising parts.


Pervert
 
2022-07-05 1:08:24 PM  
"Yep, otta burn a good long time come next fire any day now."
 
2022-07-05 1:36:40 PM  
luna1580

because it's nearly dead?

FTFY.  That is a stump.

Based on photographs, said Guy, the tree appears unhealthy, a phenomenon he said is increasingly common in B.C.

Holy hell it's f*cking dead. It was probably well over a thousand years old, that's a pretty good run. Likely taken out by a wind event. I'd bet the farm it survived more than its fair share of droughts. Those have happened since time immemorial you do know that?

"Red cedar has been showing more signs of distress in recent years than other ... species in times of drought," he said. "Which is probably climate change-related. So I guess another thing about these trees is they remind us they've been through a lot - but they might not get through the next hundred years or so.""

They likely won't get through the next hundred years for the same reason you're not going to live to be 230 years old....

I live 5 minutes from old growth cedars, the one spot with the biggest tress has a few absolute units where most of the other trees are either dead or of smaller stature (still stunning and cool). I'll make an analogy for people who clearly have never been in an old growth cedar forest. Take a sample of 80 to 90 year old people: how many are in spectacular states of health 1 or 2 out of a hundred? This is universal among living things.
 
2022-07-05 2:24:45 PM  

New Age Redneck: luna1580

because it's nearly dead?

FTFY.  That is a stump.

Based on photographs, said Guy, the tree appears unhealthy, a phenomenon he said is increasingly common in B.C.

Holy hell it's f*cking dead. It was probably well over a thousand years old, that's a pretty good run. Likely taken out by a wind event. I'd bet the farm it survived more than its fair share of droughts. Those have happened since time immemorial you do know that?

"Red cedar has been showing more signs of distress in recent years than other ... species in times of drought," he said. "Which is probably climate change-related. So I guess another thing about these trees is they remind us they've been through a lot - but they might not get through the next hundred years or so.""

They likely won't get through the next hundred years for the same reason you're not going to live to be 230 years old....

I live 5 minutes from old growth cedars, the one spot with the biggest tress has a few absolute units where most of the other trees are either dead or of smaller stature (still stunning and cool). I'll make an analogy for people who clearly have never been in an old growth cedar forest. Take a sample of 80 to 90 year old people: how many are in spectacular states of health 1 or 2 out of a hundred? This is universal among living things.


ThisIsFine.jpg
 
2022-07-05 5:51:52 PM  
I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise

"Yep, otta burn a good long time come next fire any day now."

You do know that for that tree to have made it past a 1000 years there was no disturbance on that site for likely 1200 years, most certainly not a fire. You do know that right? You do know fire hasn't ever been part of succession in Cedar/Hemlock zones because they are wet even during the most biblical droughts and there are pretty much zero ladder fuels present. You do know that too, right? You do know the absolutely crucial role fire plays in forest health and reproduction?

Clearly you are the expert here. Obviously what I've learned from being involved professionally in forestry in BC for the last 30 years is completely incorrect, maybe you could enlighten us?


ThisIsFine.jpg

How about debate the points? Why are they "wrong"?
 
2022-07-06 12:08:09 PM  

New Age Redneck: I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise

"Yep, otta burn a good long time come next fire any day now."

You do know that for that tree to have made it past a 1000 years there was no disturbance on that site for likely 1200 years, most certainly not a fire. You do know that right? You do know fire hasn't ever been part of succession in Cedar/Hemlock zones because they are wet even during the most biblical droughts and there are pretty much zero ladder fuels present. You do know that too, right? You do know the absolutely crucial role fire plays in forest health and reproduction?

Clearly you are the expert here. Obviously what I've learned from being involved professionally in forestry in BC for the last 30 years is completely incorrect, maybe you could enlighten us?


ThisIsFine.jpg

How about debate the points? Why are they "wrong"?


Granted, I live in a much drier part of the continent, but I thought that forest fires were a part of all forest ecologies--that we are in fact still paying the price for having fought forest fires too effectively earlier in the twentieth century.  It is not unheard of for some of the larger trees to survive a burn, and unnatural for a forest to remain untouched by fire for a thousand years.
 
2022-07-06 4:55:32 PM  

Staffist: I'm nearly 50 or 100 years old.


Let's cut you in half to count the rings, then we'll know.
 
2022-07-06 4:56:19 PM  

talkertopc: FTA: The western red cedar found in Lynn Headwaters Regional Park is likely 1,000 to 2,000 years old, say experts

Let's cut it and find out.

/for science!


Dammit
 
2022-07-06 4:59:18 PM  
flondrix

Granted, I live in a much drier part of the continent, but I thought that forest fires were a part of all forest ecologies-

They can be, but the probability that you have a fire in ICH BEC zones is as close to zero as possible, coastal CH zones even lower. I can speak well for BC in that fire plays a huge part in the IDF and PP zones, and is relatively infrequent in the EsSf. (I'll explain the jargon see below)

that we are in fact still paying the price for having fought forest fires too effectively earlier in the twentieth century.

I would argue and many more people far more knowledgeable than I would also agree. Fire suppression has allowed massive fuel build ups to occur that wouldn't have pre-settlement. Previous to our suppression efforts in BC on average 500,000 hectares a year burned, we've only recently had more area than that burn. During the time we've been putting out fires and as our initial attack has gotten more efficient we average 30,000 ha a year. We are now seeing way more fires crowning out because the ladder fuels have over accumulated. Instead of high frequency low intensity fire cycle we have a low frequency high intensity fire cycle. We also have serious issues with fuels on our urban interfaces which is why we lose so many structures when these fires get near developments.

It is not unheard of for some of the larger trees to survive a burn, and unnatural for a forest to remain untouched by fire for a thousand years.

The first half of that I absolutely agree with, ponderosa pine, larch and doug fir are equipped with fire resistant bark which protects them from ground based fires. I have gone out with a forester and using an increment borer found fire scars in old ponderosa pines  in 5-10 year intervals up to about 70 years ago. Those trees are also self pruning for protecting themselves from fire.

The second part I disagree with, it is "normal" for cedar/hemlock zones to be fire free for very long periods of time. Those forests regenerate and produce nutrients through slow rot and decomposition, unlike fire prone sites that get nutrients from the fires rapidly decomposing accumulated leaves, needles, branches, etc.

The jargon above like EsSf. PP, IDF, ICH are BEC zones, this is a good breakdown of what they are:

https://cfcg.forestry.ubc.ca/resources/cataloguing-in-situ-genetic-resources/ich-zone/

I post these in every forest fire thread as I see it as vaccinating our communities against wildfires and the Logan Lake story is proof that working together and managing interface can lead to success like theirs in losing no structures despite being seriously threatened by the Tremont fire last year.

https://firesmartbc.ca/

IN OUR DEFENCE, District of Logan Lake's Wildfire Protection Plan
Youtube vG5RFiD5Elg
 
2022-07-06 4:59:33 PM  

I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: "Yep, otta burn a good long time come next fire any day now."


Growing up we had a ton of deadfall cedar in the woods behind the house which we would occasionally use for firewood (mostly 3" or so diameter).  Smelled awesome.
 
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