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(Food and Wine)   Pasta sauce, gumbo, beef or chicken stew get some attention on the Food tab. Having made cassoulet only once in my life, what's some good advice for my next try?   (foodandwine.com) divider line
    More: Misc, Pork, French cuisine, Sausage, Stew, Cooking, Cassoulet, Confit, Duck confit  
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245 clicks; posted to Food » on 03 Jul 2022 at 6:50 PM (12 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

 
2022-07-03 7:01:13 PM  
10 votes:
hubiestubert needs to write a book , imho.
 
2022-07-03 8:12:10 PM  
10 votes:

eejack: So...just because I just made this today on a lark and it was delish...

[iFrame https://www.youtube.com/embed/Uuli3So6Oo4?autoplay=1&widget_referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&start=0&enablejsapi=1&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&widgetid=1]

/ no it isn't
// but it is
/// jacques gets three


Jacques is a Gottverdammt French National Treasure. And one of my heroes. He has a version in his Art of Cooking, and it's fantastic. I almost always suggest this two volume set to any home cook who wants to do more. It's very much a full course in cooking, from garde manger and stocks and simple items, to patisserie. It's phenomenal. And his gifts as an instructor come through, because each recipe builds skills for the next.

The cassoulet from there, you can find here.
 
2022-07-03 2:00:10 PM  
7 votes:
This recipe isn't bad. Duck confit, sausage, salt pork, with the addition of pancetta and prosciutto is nice. They've sort of extended the process a bit, and made it fussy, but this is for home, and not a professional kitchen where we'd be doing things in various stages as part of daily prep and reserving. Lining the bottom of the cassole d'Issel with pork skin is super fussy, but it is kind of traditional. And it helps to keep the mess of beans and protein from sticking to the pot. While releasing a bit more fat into the whole thing.

You're looking at stages of cooking. You can do your duck a bit ahead of time. And it's kind of an all day thing, basically checking in, getting your stages set, and then hare off to do something else for a bit, and come back, until you get your ragout ready, then layer, and bake for an hour or two. Stir everything back in, top with your sausage, reserved fat, and bread crumbs and bake a bit longer. An hour at 275 is about right to brown the crumbs and keep the rest burbling gently under the surface.

Cassoulet IS super rich, and none too great for folks with sodium issues, but it's yummy. And a li'l of a pain in the ass to clean afterwards.
 
2022-07-03 6:57:16 PM  
6 votes:

hubiestubert: This recipe isn't bad. Duck confit, sausage, salt pork, with the addition of pancetta and prosciutto is nice. They've sort of extended the process a bit, and made it fussy, but this is for home, and not a professional kitchen where we'd be doing things in various stages as part of daily prep and reserving. Lining the bottom of the cassole d'Issel with pork skin is super fussy, but it is kind of traditional. And it helps to keep the mess of beans and protein from sticking to the pot. While releasing a bit more fat into the whole thing.

You're looking at stages of cooking. You can do your duck a bit ahead of time. And it's kind of an all day thing, basically checking in, getting your stages set, and then hare off to do something else for a bit, and come back, until you get your ragout ready, then layer, and bake for an hour or two. Stir everything back in, top with your sausage, reserved fat, and bread crumbs and bake a bit longer. An hour at 275 is about right to brown the crumbs and keep the rest burbling gently under the surface.

Cassoulet IS super rich, and none too great for folks with sodium issues, but it's yummy. And a li'l of a pain in the ass to clean afterwards.


Not subby, but you are confirming my thought that any savoring of cassoulet should continue to be satiated by restaurants with good chefs
 
2022-07-03 7:21:06 PM  
5 votes:

phlegmjay: Whether you follow his specific recipe, Kenji's article is a food read, as it contains a lot of interesting info and technique.


I like the cut of his jib on this. Part of the reason that most recipes go with breadcrumbs is to create a crust. His version is far less fussy, and preserves the spirit of the dish. I'mma bookmark that.
 
2022-07-03 7:58:44 PM  
5 votes:
So...just because I just made this today on a lark and it was delish...

Sausage Cassoulet | Jacques Pépin Cooking At Home | KQED
Youtube Uuli3So6Oo4


/ no it isn't
// but it is
/// jacques gets three
 
2022-07-03 8:03:23 PM  
4 votes:
The thing to remember about cassoulet is that its roots are peasant food. It's your basic bean pot. And then you add stuff depending what's on hand. There has to be some salt pork lying around. Toss it in. Sausage? Go for it. Got an old duck or goose? Cook it up tender and you have a feast.
 
2022-07-03 8:07:48 PM  
4 votes:

eejack: So...just because I just made this today on a lark and it was delish...

[YouTube video: Sausage Cassoulet | Jacques Pépin Cooking At Home | KQED]

/ no it isn't
// but it is
/// jacques gets three


There's a channel on Pluto that has Julia and Jacques. It's in the diy section
 
2022-07-04 9:02:47 AM  
4 votes:

CoonAce: BlazeTrailer: hubiestubert: This recipe isn't bad. Duck confit, sausage, salt pork, with the addition of pancetta and prosciutto is nice. They've sort of extended the process a bit, and made it fussy, but this is for home, and not a professional kitchen where we'd be doing things in various stages as part of daily prep and reserving. Lining the bottom of the cassole d'Issel with pork skin is super fussy, but it is kind of traditional. And it helps to keep the mess of beans and protein from sticking to the pot. While releasing a bit more fat into the whole thing.

You're looking at stages of cooking. You can do your duck a bit ahead of time. And it's kind of an all day thing, basically checking in, getting your stages set, and then hare off to do something else for a bit, and come back, until you get your ragout ready, then layer, and bake for an hour or two. Stir everything back in, top with your sausage, reserved fat, and bread crumbs and bake a bit longer. An hour at 275 is about right to brown the crumbs and keep the rest burbling gently under the surface.

Cassoulet IS super rich, and none too great for folks with sodium issues, but it's yummy. And a li'l of a pain in the ass to clean afterwards.

Not subby, but you are confirming my thought that any savoring of cassoulet should continue to be satiated by restaurants with good chefs

I think of cassoulet as home cooking, but I'll leave the soufflé potatoes and oysters Rockefeller to Galatoire's.


A LOT of French and Italian cuisine that is in today's mind as haute cuisine or Continental is just peasant cuisine done with a budget and un petit peu of fussiness. Methods before refrigeration meant some creative preservation, and now that we have easy storage, people aren't doing the sort of salting, brining, or confit, or making preserves and jellies, or pickling any where near as much.

In Japan, where a LOT of the cuisine is dedicated to pickles of all sorts, it's getting rarer and rarer to find folks doing their own any longer. Because of space issues, as well as time. It's becoming a valued skill to still be able to do well, and a rarity in many settings.

Food moves and marches on with the times. But it's nice to keep to the roots of a cuisine, and celebrate the everyday folks who created it, and kept it alive.
 
2022-07-03 7:03:36 PM  
3 votes:

alienated: hubiestubert needs to write a book , imho.


I was thinking the same - a comic strip book. Think Kitchen Confidential crossed with Dilbert.
 
2022-07-03 7:41:58 PM  
3 votes:

hubiestubert: phlegmjay: Whether you follow his specific recipe, Kenji's article is a food read, as it contains a lot of interesting info and technique.

I like the cut of his jib on this. Part of the reason that most recipes go with breadcrumbs is to create a crust. His version is far less fussy, and preserves the spirit of the dish. I'mma bookmark that.


It's delicious. I've only made it once, and I screwed up the crust a bit, but it was still great.
 
2022-07-03 8:26:26 PM  
3 votes:

BlazeTrailer: alienated: hubiestubert needs to write a book , imho.

I was thinking the same - a comic strip book. Think Kitchen Confidential crossed with Dilbert.


I was thinking more along the lines of

Anthony Bourdain on Archer
Youtube 7dgbA6akGnw
 
2022-07-03 8:54:20 PM  
2 votes:
Pay someone to do it next time because you'll never get around to the clean-up post-op
 
2022-07-03 9:21:48 PM  
2 votes:
I will add to be careful with the salt. You will cook off a lot of liquid and it's easy to make it way salty as it reduces. It's also easy to make it way too bland. Good luck balancing. But if you're using ham hocks and other salt cured meats for, that will add a lot to the dish.
 
2022-07-03 6:59:51 PM  
1 vote:
I have found the duck fat can be purchased at whole foods. But making your own and getting freshly cooked duck is a welcome bonus
 
2022-07-03 7:04:03 PM  
1 vote:
Whether you follow his specific recipe, Kenji's article is a food read, as it contains a lot of interesting info and technique.
 
2022-07-04 7:55:30 AM  
1 vote:

BlazeTrailer: hubiestubert: This recipe isn't bad. Duck confit, sausage, salt pork, with the addition of pancetta and prosciutto is nice. They've sort of extended the process a bit, and made it fussy, but this is for home, and not a professional kitchen where we'd be doing things in various stages as part of daily prep and reserving. Lining the bottom of the cassole d'Issel with pork skin is super fussy, but it is kind of traditional. And it helps to keep the mess of beans and protein from sticking to the pot. While releasing a bit more fat into the whole thing.

You're looking at stages of cooking. You can do your duck a bit ahead of time. And it's kind of an all day thing, basically checking in, getting your stages set, and then hare off to do something else for a bit, and come back, until you get your ragout ready, then layer, and bake for an hour or two. Stir everything back in, top with your sausage, reserved fat, and bread crumbs and bake a bit longer. An hour at 275 is about right to brown the crumbs and keep the rest burbling gently under the surface.

Cassoulet IS super rich, and none too great for folks with sodium issues, but it's yummy. And a li'l of a pain in the ass to clean afterwards.

Not subby, but you are confirming my thought that any savoring of cassoulet should continue to be satiated by restaurants with good chefs


I think of cassoulet as home cooking, but I'll leave the soufflé potatoes and oysters Rockefeller to Galatoire's.
 
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