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(CNBC)   New innovation: economy class passengers may pay an extra fee to lie down during long flights, which is totally different from paying an extra fee to upgrade to business class   (cnbc.com) divider line
    More: Stupid, Sleep, Cathay Pacific, Air New Zealand, Air France, Circadian rhythm, Airbus A380, bunk beds, Boeing  
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720 clicks; posted to Business » on 03 Jul 2022 at 3:38 PM (21 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-07-03 4:49:22 PM  
6 votes:
**PROBABLE STORY REPEAT**

Around 15 years ago, we got a direct flight to Hawaii from farking Cincinnati. After we were airborne we discovered that it was around 20% full. Maybe less. It was a widebody jet, and most people had chosen window seats so there was row after row in the middle of the plane that were empty. Ever the crafty bugger, about an hour from the airport, I took an Ambien, headed for an open row, pushed up a couple of arm rests, laid down across the seats, and woke up over the Pacific. Nobody tapped my shoulder to ask me to return to my seat. Nobody objected. I realize that if your only experience of air travel is the last 10 years, you might not believe that happened.
 
2022-07-03 6:40:08 PM  
4 votes:

wetrat: International business class didn't used to mean a bed. But it the last few decades, it's been an arms race to have the nicest business class. It has gotten so nice that (a) most airlines have dropped first class because nobody could tell the difference between business and first and (b) there was too big of a gap between economy (which is still terrible) and business (which is ultra luxurious). To solve this problem, airlines introduced "premium economy", which is basically what business class used to be. It's only natural that the next step is to introduce beds into premium economy, rinse and repeat.


This is the problem with damn near everything these days. You have the "affordable" tier, which is garbage, and then you have the ridiculously expensive and excessively luxurious tier. There doesn't seem to be much of a "somewhat pricey, but good without being excessive" tier anymore.
 
2022-07-03 4:32:19 PM  
3 votes:
International business class didn't used to mean a bed. But it the last few decades, it's been an arms race to have the nicest business class. It has gotten so nice that (a) most airlines have dropped first class because nobody could tell the difference between business and first and (b) there was too big of a gap between economy (which is still terrible) and business (which is ultra luxurious). To solve this problem, airlines introduced "premium economy", which is basically what business class used to be. It's only natural that the next step is to introduce beds into premium economy, rinse and repeat.
 
2022-07-03 5:11:20 PM  
1 vote:

yakmans_dad: **PROBABLE STORY REPEAT**

Around 15 years ago, we got a direct flight to Hawaii from farking Cincinnati. After we were airborne we discovered that it was around 20% full. Maybe less. It was a widebody jet, and most people had chosen window seats so there was row after row in the middle of the plane that were empty. Ever the crafty bugger, about an hour from the airport, I took an Ambien, headed for an open row, pushed up a couple of arm rests, laid down across the seats, and woke up over the Pacific. Nobody tapped my shoulder to ask me to return to my seat. Nobody objected. I realize that if your only experience of air travel is the last 10 years, you might not believe that happened.


I had a similar experience in the early 90s.  I was on a 747 flight from Heathrow to Riyadh.  Those 4 middle seats were quite comfy.  RIP to the Queen of the Skies.
 
2022-07-03 6:18:49 PM  
1 vote:

Stile4aly: yakmans_dad: **PROBABLE STORY REPEAT**

Around 15 years ago, we got a direct flight to Hawaii from farking Cincinnati. After we were airborne we discovered that it was around 20% full. Maybe less. It was a widebody jet, and most people had chosen window seats so there was row after row in the middle of the plane that were empty. Ever the crafty bugger, about an hour from the airport, I took an Ambien, headed for an open row, pushed up a couple of arm rests, laid down across the seats, and woke up over the Pacific. Nobody tapped my shoulder to ask me to return to my seat. Nobody objected. I realize that if your only experience of air travel is the last 10 years, you might not believe that happened.

I had a similar experience in the early 90s.  I was on a 747 flight from Heathrow to Riyadh.  Those 4 middle seats were quite comfy.  RIP to the Queen of the Skies.


I probably never been on a flight with less than 80% occupancy, but I do recall one or two recently where enough middle rows were empty for people to lie down across them.  I don't recall anybody having a problem with that.

Now on a 15 hour flight from LA to Sydney, someone asked me to give up my aisle seat with an open middle seat so they could lie down.  I did not.
 
2022-07-03 7:19:40 PM  
1 vote:

wetrat: International business class didn't used to mean a bed. But it the last few decades, it's been an arms race to have the nicest business class. It has gotten so nice that (a) most airlines have dropped first class because nobody could tell the difference between business and first and (b) there was too big of a gap between economy (which is still terrible) and business (which is ultra luxurious). To solve this problem, airlines introduced "premium economy", which is basically what business class used to be. It's only natural that the next step is to introduce beds into premium economy, rinse and repeat.


I used to travel to Asia on business, and fortunately, my company paid for business class tickets, which I could occasionally upgrade to first. There is a huge difference in business class, from seats, to food, to service, depending on the airline. Singapore business class is almost as good as some (American) airlines' first class service. And the poorly-rated airlines' (which I won't name) business class are just ok.
Here is an easy way to spot the difference between first class and business class on a long haul trans-Pacific flight.
If you get a huge pillow and caviar, you are in first class.
 
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