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(CNBC)   American Airlines IT department solves the pilot shortage   (cnbc.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Southwest Airlines, Delta Air Lines, American Airlines pilots, Airline, Aircraft, Avianca, Regional airline, Airlines  
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1897 clicks; posted to Business » on 02 Jul 2022 at 8:53 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



26 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-07-02 9:06:01 PM  
Time for another bailout.
 
2022-07-02 9:16:47 PM  
They do their damndest to avoid letting pilots drop any trips at at all.
 
2022-07-02 9:53:21 PM  
I still don't understand where everyone is working. Every place is scrambling to staff their industry. Stores and restaurants are the worst hit, 2-3 hour waits everywhere, fast food places are closing their lobby and closing dar earlier. But it's everywhere, not just restaurants and convenience stores.

So I ask again; If every place is suffering labor shortages, where in the fark is everyone working?
 
2022-07-02 10:01:33 PM  

Mikey1969: I still don't understand where everyone is working. Every place is scrambling to staff their industry. Stores and restaurants are the worst hit, 2-3 hour waits everywhere, fast food places are closing their lobby and closing dar earlier. But it's everywhere, not just restaurants and convenience stores.

So I ask again; If every place is suffering labor shortages, where in the fark is everyone working?


Some died.  Alot realized the cost of childcare was eating up the income of the second household job.  Even more realized that housing costs were up so high they got roommates so they can afford a roof over their head and don't needd that second job.
 
2022-07-02 10:17:35 PM  
So they fixed the glitch?
 
2022-07-02 10:23:13 PM  

Mikey1969: I still don't understand where everyone is working. Every place is scrambling to staff their industry. Stores and restaurants are the worst hit, 2-3 hour waits everywhere, fast food places are closing their lobby and closing dar earlier. But it's everywhere, not just restaurants and convenience stores.

So I ask again; If every place is suffering labor shortages, where in the fark is everyone working?


The actual peak years the Baby Boom being born was 1957-1961 with 1959 being the absolute top birth year.  Cultural zeitgeist seems to think of the Boomers as being Woodstock, Beatles, and Vietnam.  That was only true of the very early ones.  The actually larger years, in absolute numbers, were disco to Cosby boomers.   Anyway, the real median retirement age is like 63.  Yeah, plenty of people work to 70.  But even more get to even a deeply diminished Social Security check (62), any reliable income at all, and hang up the hat.  Working sucks.  Anyway, the largest birth years ever have mostly retired over the last two years.  That has cascading effects down to not enough people at the Burger King.
 
2022-07-02 10:25:13 PM  

DORMAMU: Mikey1969: I still don't understand where everyone is working. Every place is scrambling to staff their industry. Stores and restaurants are the worst hit, 2-3 hour waits everywhere, fast food places are closing their lobby and closing dar earlier. But it's everywhere, not just restaurants and convenience stores.

So I ask again; If every place is suffering labor shortages, where in the fark is everyone working?

Some died.  Alot realized the cost of childcare was eating up the income of the second household job.  Even more realized that housing costs were up so high they got roommates so they can afford a roof over their head and don't needd that second job.


Also, people went and got better paying jobs or started their own businesses as the free time, government stimulus payments, and extra unemployment gave them the breathing room needed to either get their business on its feet or get the training required to get a better job.
 
2022-07-02 10:40:47 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-07-02 11:23:58 PM  
There is no fix. The company put pilots back on their flights. There is no mechanism in the contract for them to do that. The union is advising pilots who dropped trips to stay at home.

Best thing you can do right now is come up with a solid plan B if you are flying on AA in the next couple weeks. Hopefully you won't need it.
 
2022-07-02 11:35:52 PM  

skinink: So they fixed the glitch?


Skeptical me says they rolled back something because it wasn't used how they thought it would be.
 
2022-07-02 11:36:31 PM  

TheSubjunctive: Mikey1969: I still don't understand where everyone is working. Every place is scrambling to staff their industry. Stores and restaurants are the worst hit, 2-3 hour waits everywhere, fast food places are closing their lobby and closing dar earlier. But it's everywhere, not just restaurants and convenience stores.

So I ask again; If every place is suffering labor shortages, where in the fark is everyone working?

The actual peak years the Baby Boom being born was 1957-1961 with 1959 being the absolute top birth year.  Cultural zeitgeist seems to think of the Boomers as being Woodstock, Beatles, and Vietnam.  That was only true of the very early ones.  The actually larger years, in absolute numbers, were disco to Cosby boomers.   Anyway, the real median retirement age is like 63.  Yeah, plenty of people work to 70.  But even more get to even a deeply diminished Social Security check (62), any reliable income at all, and hang up the hat.  Working sucks.  Anyway, the largest birth years ever have mostly retired over the last two years.  That has cascading effects down to not enough people at the Burger King.


Businesses have also been reluctant hire back after the Covid layoffs. Corporate profits at a high, adding workers just eats up that profit. Look at the call times for airlines. Delta and AA run 8 hours to talk to an agent.  They refuse to hire any more agents. I think they have discovered that if everyone treats their customers poorly, they'll just have to put up with it as they have no recourse.

And when they do hire back, those senior baby boomers with 40 years experience are being replaced with someone with zero experience because they are taking the opportunity to reduce wages.
 
2022-07-02 11:41:40 PM  
Flew into Sky Harbor today on Southwest (direct flight from TPA to PHX). Everything was on time by some miracle.
Airports are insane though. Wear a mask at all times. Luckily, I have access to Level 3 masks, so I felt safe.
 
2022-07-02 11:49:37 PM  
Did they use a Sabre?

Fark user imageView Full Size

Or maybe they just called up some old Korean War veterans who flew F-86 Sabres back in the day

Fark user imageView Full Size

F-86 Sabre VS MiG-15 Dogfight Korean War Multiple Kills
Youtube tsGREOUphOM

The video is worth 4 minutes.  Happy 4th of July!
 
2022-07-03 1:39:46 AM  

HempHead: TheSubjunctive: Mikey1969: I still don't understand where everyone is working. Every place is scrambling to staff their industry. Stores and restaurants are the worst hit, 2-3 hour waits everywhere, fast food places are closing their lobby and closing dar earlier. But it's everywhere, not just restaurants and convenience stores.

So I ask again; If every place is suffering labor shortages, where in the fark is everyone working?

The actual peak years the Baby Boom being born was 1957-1961 with 1959 being the absolute top birth year.  Cultural zeitgeist seems to think of the Boomers as being Woodstock, Beatles, and Vietnam.  That was only true of the very early ones.  The actually larger years, in absolute numbers, were disco to Cosby boomers.   Anyway, the real median retirement age is like 63.  Yeah, plenty of people work to 70.  But even more get to even a deeply diminished Social Security check (62), any reliable income at all, and hang up the hat.  Working sucks.  Anyway, the largest birth years ever have mostly retired over the last two years.  That has cascading effects down to not enough people at the Burger King.

Businesses have also been reluctant hire back after the Covid layoffs. Corporate profits at a high, adding workers just eats up that profit. Look at the call times for airlines. Delta and AA run 8 hours to talk to an agent.  They refuse to hire any more agents. I think they have discovered that if everyone treats their customers poorly, they'll just have to put up with it as they have no recourse.

And when they do hire back, those senior baby boomers with 40 years experience are being replaced with someone with zero experience because they are taking the opportunity to reduce wages.


This is my feeling. The entire "No one wants to work!" is simply the capitalist class taking advantage of what was ONCE but IS NO LONGER a pandemic-related issue to reset everyone's expectations of customer service and the like for the worse. There's some subset of customers that will just shrug and go "Yeah, what are you gonna do?" or "Damn those Biden government handouts!" (That simply don't exist anymore) and accept the terrible service and thus won't demand improvement.

So many places that loudly proclaim "We'd hire but no one wants to work" aren't doing anything to make their jobs more attractive for workers, or in actuality aren't even trying to hire (there's lots of reports - anecdotal mind you - of people applying to those kinds of places only to learn they aren't actually hiring at all).
 
2022-07-03 1:56:59 AM  

TheSubjunctive: Mikey1969: I still don't understand where everyone is working. Every place is scrambling to staff their industry. Stores and restaurants are the worst hit, 2-3 hour waits everywhere, fast food places are closing their lobby and closing dar earlier. But it's everywhere, not just restaurants and convenience stores.

So I ask again; If every place is suffering labor shortages, where in the fark is everyone working?

The actual peak years the Baby Boom being born was 1957-1961 with 1959 being the absolute top birth year.  Cultural zeitgeist seems to think of the Boomers as being Woodstock, Beatles, and Vietnam.  That was only true of the very early ones.  The actually larger years, in absolute numbers, were disco to Cosby boomers.   Anyway, the real median retirement age is like 63.  Yeah, plenty of people work to 70.  But even more get to even a deeply diminished Social Security check (62), any reliable income at all, and hang up the hat.  Working sucks.  Anyway, the largest birth years ever have mostly retired over the last two years.  That has cascading effects down to not enough people at the Burger King.


No.

Please try to actually READ a farking post before being an "expert".

Your smplistc "answer" doesn't account for the sheer VOLUME of places that have the staffing shortage. On top of that, I see plenty of jobs that are not available for "Boomers", such as the manual labor/manufacturing jobs that my stepson is working/looking into.

If you had a real answer, you would have covered all age brackets. Instead, you're pushing out a particular little turd that you probably heard someone else wrongly state, and since you don't have the imagination to come up with your own insights, you answer like 10% of the question, and do poorly at that.

Do you have an answer, or at you just trying to impress a date?
 
2022-07-03 2:58:36 AM  

Mikey1969: TheSubjunctive: Mikey1969: I still don't understand where everyone is working. Every place is scrambling to staff their industry. Stores and restaurants are the worst hit, 2-3 hour waits everywhere, fast food places are closing their lobby and closing dar earlier. But it's everywhere, not just restaurants and convenience stores.

So I ask again; If every place is suffering labor shortages, where in the fark is everyone working?

The actual peak years the Baby Boom being born was 1957-1961 with 1959 being the absolute top birth year.  Cultural zeitgeist seems to think of the Boomers as being Woodstock, Beatles, and Vietnam.  That was only true of the very early ones.  The actually larger years, in absolute numbers, were disco to Cosby boomers.   Anyway, the real median retirement age is like 63.  Yeah, plenty of people work to 70.  But even more get to even a deeply diminished Social Security check (62), any reliable income at all, and hang up the hat.  Working sucks.  Anyway, the largest birth years ever have mostly retired over the last two years.  That has cascading effects down to not enough people at the Burger King.

No.

Please try to actually READ a farking post before being an "expert".

Your smplistc "answer" doesn't account for the sheer VOLUME of places that have the staffing shortage. On top of that, I see plenty of jobs that are not available for "Boomers", such as the manual labor/manufacturing jobs that my stepson is working/looking into.

If you had a real answer, you would have covered all age brackets. Instead, you're pushing out a particular little turd that you probably heard someone else wrongly state, and since you don't have the imagination to come up with your own insights, you answer like 10% of the question, and do poorly at that.

Do you have an answer, or at you just trying to impress a date?


Wow dude, chill
 
2022-07-03 3:29:57 AM  
Interesting responses on this thread. I see Capital is still on strike, the pigs are still on a work slowdown in most major cities, and the labor movements in this country has never been this strong in a minute. The Pilots union needs to go on strike already.
/call center workers should unionize already
 
2022-07-03 6:10:13 AM  

iron_city_ap: There is no fix. The company put pilots back on their flights. There is no mechanism in the contract for them to do that. The union is advising pilots who dropped trips to stay at home.

Best thing you can do right now is come up with a solid plan B if you are flying on AA in the next couple weeks. Hopefully you won't need it.


Solid union planning as usual. AA is already facing trouble maintaining flights and has been cutting them so let's force our employer and one of the biggest airlines into bankruptcy or at least into a financial state where they start major restructuring by cutting more flights, jobs, salaries, and benefits. Worst case scenario, management gets golden parachutes and everyone else gets pink slips. That will definitely further the best interests of everyone involved in the airline industry.
 
2022-07-03 7:18:55 AM  

Mikey1969: you answer like 10% of the question, and do poorly at that.

Do you have an answer, or at you just trying to impress a date?


You're clearly offering 0% of any answer and brutally butthurt because someone is offering 10% of one?  Another 10% is that, if we had had Obama-era levels of (licit) immigration over the last 5 years, there would be another million and change working-age adults, largely (but not entirely) in the 'bottom' of the economy.  Anyway, there is a trickle-on effect.  I personally know people who were driving buses and building cabinets four years ago who got laid off or furloughed, took a six month bootcamp in something boring, and took up a desk job.

The idea that companies aren't really trying feels like it has some merit.  My team of what was about 25 has lost 8 people since Covid, largely the best (or at least the most senior, buffering us from meetings).  Upper management tried to hire a mid-level department lead (with a joke of a listing) maybe 6 months ago.  That failed and they haven't even tried since.  It's "muck along with what you have" all the way.  But, overall, I don't think that's the answer because unemployment is effectively zero.
 
2022-07-03 9:04:43 AM  
Timely for me personally.  I'm currently in the interview process for a Senior Data Architect spot at one of the major airlines.

If "bugs" like this can occur in the first place, maybe my time is best spent in another industry.
 
2022-07-03 10:45:10 AM  

Heliodorus: iron_city_ap: There is no fix. The company put pilots back on their flights. There is no mechanism in the contract for them to do that. The union is advising pilots who dropped trips to stay at home.

Best thing you can do right now is come up with a solid plan B if you are flying on AA in the next couple weeks. Hopefully you won't need it.

Solid union planning as usual. AA is already facing trouble maintaining flights and has been cutting them so let's force our employer and one of the biggest airlines into bankruptcy or at least into a financial state where they start major restructuring by cutting more flights, jobs, salaries, and benefits. Worst case scenario, management gets golden parachutes and everyone else gets pink slips. That will definitely further the best interests of everyone involved in the airline industry.


That's the union's job. Do you suggest the union should allow the company to violate the contract?
/ I'm not the most hung-ho union guy but I am a stickler for rules. The company cannot fix its mistakes by violating the contract.
 
2022-07-03 11:22:16 AM  

rohar: Timely for me personally.  I'm currently in the interview process for a Senior Data Architect spot at one of the major airlines.

If "bugs" like this can occur in the first place, maybe my time is best spent in another industry.


You will enjoy TPF.
 
2022-07-03 12:03:00 PM  

DRTFA: Heliodorus: iron_city_ap: There is no fix. The company put pilots back on their flights. There is no mechanism in the contract for them to do that. The union is advising pilots who dropped trips to stay at home.

Best thing you can do right now is come up with a solid plan B if you are flying on AA in the next couple weeks. Hopefully you won't need it.

Solid union planning as usual. AA is already facing trouble maintaining flights and has been cutting them so let's force our employer and one of the biggest airlines into bankruptcy or at least into a financial state where they start major restructuring by cutting more flights, jobs, salaries, and benefits. Worst case scenario, management gets golden parachutes and everyone else gets pink slips. That will definitely further the best interests of everyone involved in the airline industry.

That's the union's job. Do you suggest the union should allow the company to violate the contract?
/ I'm not the most hung-ho union guy but I am a stickler for rules. The company cannot fix its mistakes by violating the contract.


They should take a long term approach and tell members they need to show up for the scheduled flights that were there before the removals. This was an unintended technical glitch that workers are trying to take unfair advantage of that will bankrupt the company. No company, no jobs in the future is more important than some pilots not working a month they don't want to. And a large amount of unemployed pilots and other airline industry workers means most won't get hired in any immediate fashion and it will just serve to push down wages and benefits across the entire industry.
 
2022-07-03 12:39:12 PM  

Heliodorus: DRTFA: Heliodorus: iron_city_ap: There is no fix. The company put pilots back on their flights. There is no mechanism in the contract for them to do that. The union is advising pilots who dropped trips to stay at home.

Best thing you can do right now is come up with a solid plan B if you are flying on AA in the next couple weeks. Hopefully you won't need it.

Solid union planning as usual. AA is already facing trouble maintaining flights and has been cutting them so let's force our employer and one of the biggest airlines into bankruptcy or at least into a financial state where they start major restructuring by cutting more flights, jobs, salaries, and benefits. Worst case scenario, management gets golden parachutes and everyone else gets pink slips. That will definitely further the best interests of everyone involved in the airline industry.

That's the union's job. Do you suggest the union should allow the company to violate the contract?
/ I'm not the most hung-ho union guy but I am a stickler for rules. The company cannot fix its mistakes by violating the contract.

They should take a long term approach and tell members they need to show up for the scheduled flights that were there before the removals. This was an unintended technical glitch that workers are trying to take unfair advantage of that will bankrupt the company. No company, no jobs in the future is more important than some pilots not working a month they don't want to. And a large amount of unemployed pilots and other airline industry workers means most won't get hired in any immediate fashion and it will just serve to push down wages and benefits across the entire industry.


It isn't taking unfair advantage. The pilots selected an option in the computer system to drop (be removed from) trips. The company had the system set to '100% no'. Well, someone in the company turned something off, so then the system dropped the trips. It wasn't something that randomly or arbitrarily removed pilots. Everything they did was 100% legit. The company screwed up.
 
2022-07-03 3:42:18 PM  

DRTFA: That's the union's job. Do you suggest the union should allow the company to violate the contract?


For a one-time, unintentional issue that can be fixed with both sides being reasonable, yes.

I'm the union steward at my job. We went through a thing at my job on our annual leave bid. Our contract says that any time a BUE cancels approved leave, it must be made available on a first-come-first-served basis. During the leave bid for weeks of vacation, the scheduling guy was allowing people to be waitlisted for weeks of vacation. I warned the management guy that they cannot waitlist because that's not making canceled leave available on a FCFS basis, and I was ignored. A few weeks later, someone complained and the scheduling guy in management finally hand that *WHOOPS* moment where he realized what I told him was correct. My suggestion to fix the problem was not to rebid the entire vacation year because people had already made plans and couldn't afford to lose something if another person jumped in their place. My suggestion was to go back to the point that someone chose to have a week of vacation be waitlisted and to allow them to pick the weeks that would have been open on the calendar at that junction. The end result was maybe we had one or two weeks of the year that were slightly overbooked with leave because we allowed another person to take that leave, but it was manageable with everyone's cooperation.

That's how you be reasonable. You realize something is farked up and you be part of the solution to fix it rather than always telling the other side FARK YOU.

As I've told multiple people: "You keep saying FARK YOU to everyone and soon enough the time will come that they say FARK YOU to you."
 
2022-07-03 4:55:05 PM  

mrmopar5287: DRTFA: That's the union's job. Do you suggest the union should allow the company to violate the contract?

For a one-time, unintentional issue that can be fixed with both sides being reasonable, yes.

I'm the union steward at my job. We went through a thing at my job on our annual leave bid. Our contract says that any time a BUE cancels approved leave, it must be made available on a first-come-first-served basis. During the leave bid for weeks of vacation, the scheduling guy was allowing people to be waitlisted for weeks of vacation. I warned the management guy that they cannot waitlist because that's not making canceled leave available on a FCFS basis, and I was ignored. A few weeks later, someone complained and the scheduling guy in management finally hand that *WHOOPS* moment where he realized what I told him was correct. My suggestion to fix the problem was not to rebid the entire vacation year because people had already made plans and couldn't afford to lose something if another person jumped in their place. My suggestion was to go back to the point that someone chose to have a week of vacation be waitlisted and to allow them to pick the weeks that would have been open on the calendar at that junction. The end result was maybe we had one or two weeks of the year that were slightly overbooked with leave because we allowed another person to take that leave, but it was manageable with everyone's cooperation.

That's how you be reasonable. You realize something is farked up and you be part of the solution to fix it rather than always telling the other side FARK YOU.

As I've told multiple people: "You keep saying FARK YOU to everyone and soon enough the time will come that they say FARK YOU to you."


Those "one time unintentional" issues will happen very frequently if the company learns the union allow that. Why spend money to fix broken systems at that point?
 
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