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(The New Yorker)   Words of wisdom, from an alpaca farmer   (newyorker.com) divider line
    More: Amusing, Alpaca, alpaca farm, Camelid, old farmhouse, Llama, alpaca fleece, old roommate Kyle, hard way  
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4219 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Jul 2022 at 4:26 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-07-02 12:33:06 PM  
Don't we have a resident alpaca (or was it llamas?) farmer or 2 here on Fark?
 
2022-07-02 12:55:08 PM  
Some people are better at breeding than others...

The Breeders - Cannonball
Youtube fxvkI9MTQw4
 
2022-07-02 2:12:07 PM  
The real money's in alpaca feed and medicine.
 
2022-07-02 4:31:13 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


oblig
 
2022-07-02 4:32:00 PM  
Article appears to be satire.
 
2022-07-02 4:46:00 PM  
If heading out to a picnic, alpaca lunch.
 
2022-07-02 4:48:57 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-07-02 5:00:26 PM  
Trite
 
2022-07-02 5:01:03 PM  
Things I learned in Minecraft, episode 138:

Alpacas have dead aim, impressive range, and spit will KILL you.
 
2022-07-02 5:05:31 PM  
Buried lede:

Don't start an alpaca farm.

Seriously. Don't waste the prime years of your life tending to these curly-haired, evil camels. ♦
 
2022-07-02 5:06:26 PM  

dammit just give me a login: Don't we have a resident alpaca (or was it llamas?) farmer or 2 here on Fark?


Here I am!

I know it's a silly article but...

Alpacas are cheap.  If he paid $15000 for an Alpaca he got fleeced (sorry).  We paid like $600 Canadian for 5 of them, all but one with amazing fleece and good breeding stock if we wanted to breed.  For $15000 we could have bought a large commercial herd.

Yes they spit, not that much and almost never at us (the exception being shearing day...  Guaranteed someone is getting a hefty green blast).

Water...  Just put in a stock waterer...  Was this guy really trying to run a farm hand watering?  Also $3k for a vet visit?  Are there not farm vets where he lives?  Ours comes to the house and will treat all 7 animals for a few hundred bucks!

Fighting teeth...  Yeah that's real.  They use them to try and castrate rival males.  However, it's extraordinarily unusual to have domestic alpacas that haven't had them removed.

Poop/manure...  Actually the critters are super polite poopers.  They all go in a single location, and all at once.  Like one wanders over to the poo pile, then within 10 minutes they have all gone in the same place...  There is only one poo pile per pasture.  Once a spring we shovel the deer like dried out poops into a spreader with some grass seed and spread it in the year.  The winter sheltered gets a little bit gross and we pitch it out twice in a season.  The straw and everything in it just goes in a pile and gets turned.  That composts beautifully and every year we use it to fertilize our garden and invite friends to pick it up.  If it ever gets too much we do a trip to the compost pile at the landfill.  Their poop doesn't really smell.

The business side of it...  You could make a living with something like 30 or so breeding animals.  Alpaca meat is expensive.  A really enterprising hobbiest could probably have a nice supplemental income from 5 to 10 animals.  Wool is a giant waste of time because there is so much work processing.  Felt could be a money maker.  We make shoes, slippers, and hats (cowboy, baseball, mountain, cloche).  Not hard to learn, and can sell for enough to make it worth the time.  Spare fibre can be washed and used to fill dog beds...  $20 worth of soft fabric and a zipper and you've got a bed you can sell for more than $100.  Some big frames with window screens for drying poop and a big old food mill and you could sell in burlap sacks as garden supplement.  Little tea bags of ground poop that you steep in a watering can before watering flowers is very high margin.  You just need a couple of good farmers markets or a strong etsy presence to sell everything.

In the winter we do charity photo days where we dress them up silly and invite folks to come over and do family photos for Christmas cards with them. Last year we raised a couple thousand bucks with that too.

Our critters are by far the cheapest and easiest animals I've ever owned. Our little herd costs less than 2 dogs, and moving to the country to have a funny farm also means that you get to live out in the country.

Here's a silly pic of a goat in a train playing peek a boo with an Alpaca to make up for all the text.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-07-02 5:08:00 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


Llamas sound more exciting, though.
 
2022-07-02 5:09:28 PM  
Invest in Bitcoin.
Hell, I could have started my own cryptocurrency by now-alpacacoin, or some crap like that.
i.gr-assets.comView Full Size
 
2022-07-02 5:14:16 PM  

dammit just give me a login: Don't we have a resident alpaca (or was it llamas?) farmer or 2 here on Fark?


Yup.  I have llamas and had a few alpacas.  With the exception of one who spent a lot of time with my llamas & learned some manners, the alpacas were nasty.    I got rid of them fast.

About 20 years ago was when there was a big sales pitch about alpacas, "the huggable investment".  We llama farmers knew it was bullshiat.  The same thing happened a decade earlier with llamas (and emus).

People bought into it while the hype was raging, and then most lost a bunch of money because it's just not a good idea to invest in anything that poops.  I started farming right after that happened to the llama market and loved it.  They're great animals.  My herd got up to over 100 because I was doing rescue.  I would take in peoples' herds of 10 or more at a time from people who were giving them away.

A few years ago, a friend realized she was going broke raising her alpacas and gave me half a dozen.  I ended up trading them to someone else for the same number of llamas and vowed no more alpacas on my farm.
 
2022-07-02 5:17:07 PM  
So Alpacas are the rural version of crypto.
 
2022-07-02 5:19:49 PM  

shmeckle: dammit just give me a login: Don't we have a resident alpaca (or was it llamas?) farmer or 2 here on Fark?

Yup.  I have llamas and had a few alpacas.  With the exception of one who spent a lot of time with my llamas & learned some manners, the alpacas were nasty.    I got rid of them fast.

About 20 years ago was when there was a big sales pitch about alpacas, "the huggable investment".  We llama farmers knew it was bullshiat.  The same thing happened a decade earlier with llamas (and emus).

People bought into it while the hype was raging, and then most lost a bunch of money because it's just not a good idea to invest in anything that poops.  I started farming right after that happened to the llama market and loved it.  They're great animals.  My herd got up to over 100 because I was doing rescue.  I would take in peoples' herds of 10 or more at a time from people who were giving them away.

A few years ago, a friend realized she was going broke raising her alpacas and gave me half a dozen.  I ended up trading them to someone else for the same number of llamas and vowed no more alpacas on my farm.


That's funny...  My experience has been the opposite with neighboring llamas being way grumpier and more aggressive than alpacas...  We have a much smaller heard though.  We got them from a farm with about 350 animals that was downsizing.  We literally walked out in the group and picked a handful of good looking ones that were social and curious with us.  These folks would cull the antisocial ones young and sell the meat though do that may be a factor..
 
2022-07-02 5:27:04 PM  

shmeckle: dammit just give me a login: Don't we have a resident alpaca (or was it llamas?) farmer or 2 here on Fark?

Yup.  I have llamas and had a few alpacas.  With the exception of one who spent a lot of time with my llamas & learned some manners, the alpacas were nasty.    I got rid of them fast.

About 20 years ago was when there was a big sales pitch about alpacas, "the huggable investment".  We llama farmers knew it was bullshiat.  The same thing happened a decade earlier with llamas (and emus).

People bought into it while the hype was raging, and then most lost a bunch of money because it's just not a good idea to invest in anything that poops.  I started farming right after that happened to the llama market and loved it.  They're great animals.  My herd got up to over 100 because I was doing rescue.  I would take in peoples' herds of 10 or more at a time from people who were giving them away.

A few years ago, a friend realized she was going broke raising her alpacas and gave me half a dozen.  I ended up trading them to someone else for the same number of llamas and vowed no more alpacas on my farm.


Yeah, me experience is the dead opposite of yours. Alpacas are way easier to handle and far more sociable. Not sure if you've had strangely bad luck or if I've had lots of good luck. And I mean lots. I spend a lot of time with a lot of alpacas. Meat sells well and alpaca fleece is f--king amazing.  Stuff made with it sells like gangbusters at the fairs and markets we frequent. Llamas are assholes. Not sure what the difference is for you.
 
2022-07-02 5:32:49 PM  

cew-smoke: shmeckle: dammit just give me a login: Don't we have a resident alpaca (or was it llamas?) farmer or 2 here on Fark?

Yup.  I have llamas and had a few alpacas.  With the exception of one who spent a lot of time with my llamas & learned some manners, the alpacas were nasty.    I got rid of them fast.

About 20 years ago was when there was a big sales pitch about alpacas, "the huggable investment".  We llama farmers knew it was bullshiat.  The same thing happened a decade earlier with llamas (and emus).

People bought into it while the hype was raging, and then most lost a bunch of money because it's just not a good idea to invest in anything that poops.  I started farming right after that happened to the llama market and loved it.  They're great animals.  My herd got up to over 100 because I was doing rescue.  I would take in peoples' herds of 10 or more at a time from people who were giving them away.

A few years ago, a friend realized she was going broke raising her alpacas and gave me half a dozen.  I ended up trading them to someone else for the same number of llamas and vowed no more alpacas on my farm.

Yeah, me experience is the dead opposite of yours. Alpacas are way easier to handle and far more sociable. Not sure if you've had strangely bad luck or if I've had lots of good luck. And I mean lots. I spend a lot of time with a lot of alpacas. Meat sells well and alpaca fleece is f--king amazing.  Stuff made with it sells like gangbusters at the fairs and markets we frequent. Llamas are assholes. Not sure what the difference is for you.


Do you spin the fibre for wool or do fleece?
 
2022-07-02 5:33:58 PM  

fragMasterFlash: Some people are better at breeding than others...

[iFrame https://www.youtube.com/embed/fxvkI9MTQw4?autoplay=1&widget_referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&start=0&enablejsapi=1&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&widgetid=1]


Many years ago, my uncoordinated good friend had backstage passes at a Breeders concert. She's forever enshrined in cool-uncoolness for having walked up to try to say something cool to Kelly Deal but instead stumbled and grabbed Kelly's tit. lol
 
2022-07-02 5:35:58 PM  
farm? please tell me they didn't try to plant them?
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-07-02 5:40:40 PM  

foxy_canuck: cew-smoke: shmeckle: dammit just give me a login: Don't we have a resident alpaca (or was it llamas?) farmer or 2 here on Fark?

Yup.  I have llamas and had a few alpacas.  With the exception of one who spent a lot of time with my llamas & learned some manners, the alpacas were nasty.    I got rid of them fast.

About 20 years ago was when there was a big sales pitch about alpacas, "the huggable investment".  We llama farmers knew it was bullshiat.  The same thing happened a decade earlier with llamas (and emus).

People bought into it while the hype was raging, and then most lost a bunch of money because it's just not a good idea to invest in anything that poops.  I started farming right after that happened to the llama market and loved it.  They're great animals.  My herd got up to over 100 because I was doing rescue.  I would take in peoples' herds of 10 or more at a time from people who were giving them away.

A few years ago, a friend realized she was going broke raising her alpacas and gave me half a dozen.  I ended up trading them to someone else for the same number of llamas and vowed no more alpacas on my farm.

Yeah, me experience is the dead opposite of yours. Alpacas are way easier to handle and far more sociable. Not sure if you've had strangely bad luck or if I've had lots of good luck. And I mean lots. I spend a lot of time with a lot of alpacas. Meat sells well and alpaca fleece is f--king amazing.  Stuff made with it sells like gangbusters at the fairs and markets we frequent. Llamas are assholes. Not sure what the difference is for you.

Do you spin the fibre for wool or do fleece?


Depends on my brother's mood. It's his animals. I just come out and help him. We do spin a lot of it into yarn to make clothes. But sometimes we use it to make fleece jackets and the like.
 
2022-07-02 5:44:43 PM  

foxy_canuck: These folks would cull the antisocial ones young and sell the meat though so that may be a factor..


It only takes a few generations of "cull the antisocial ones young" to change the behavior of a genetically isolated group of animals.  They managed to make foxes sociable reasonably quickly (6 generations?), and foxes are less sociable than either alpacas or llamas.
 
2022-07-02 5:55:55 PM  

gameshowhost: If heading out to a picnic, alpaca lunch.


Marmoset knock you out
 
2022-07-02 5:56:42 PM  

Russ1642: [Fark user image image 267x400]


God dammit!
 
2022-07-02 6:01:06 PM  

foxy_canuck: dammit just give me a login: Don't we have a resident alpaca (or was it llamas?) farmer or 2 here on Fark?

Here I am!

I know it's a silly article but...

Alpacas are cheap.  If he paid $15000 for an Alpaca he got fleeced (sorry).  We paid like $600 Canadian for 5 of them, all but one with amazing fleece and good breeding stock if we wanted to breed.  For $15000 we could have bought a large commercial herd.


I know that I know far less than you about raising alpacas, and anything farm-related really, but even topical searches note that alpacas can run between $3000-$20000 for high quality breed stock, or wool, or pedigree alpacas. That's for American and Canadian purchases, you cannot export them legally from Peru anymore (where author claimed to have purchased them), so there must be a high demand for those breeds, not to mention transport fees and associated costs of moving livestock over international borders.

It sounds like you got a deal, or maybe you yourself are the one being fleeced, and are passing on your fleecing to your customers, additional fleecees in the multilevel market-farming scheme that is alpaca farming.  Truly it sounds like a horrifying nightmare, top to bottom.

Here's hoping you come to your senses as the author did and seek support and possibly professional help.

/it was satire all the way down btw.
 
2022-07-02 6:04:37 PM  

yellowjester: farm? please tell me they didn't try to plant them?
[Fark user image 299x168]


Eat The Placenta: Invest in Bitcoin.
Hell, I could have started my own cryptocurrency by now-alpacacoin, or some crap like that.
[i.gr-assets.com image 250x272]


plant them indeed
 
2022-07-02 6:09:33 PM  

cew-smoke: shmeckle: dammit just give me a login: Don't we have a resident alpaca (or was it llamas?) farmer or 2 here on Fark?
...
Yeah, me experience is the dead opposite of yours. Alpacas are way easier to handle and far more sociable. Not sure if you've had strangely bad luck or if I've had lots of good luck. And I mean lots. I spend a lot of time with a lot of alpacas. Meat sells well and alpaca fleece is f--king amazing.  Stuff made with it sells like gangbusters at the fairs and markets we frequent. Llamas are assholes. Not sure what the difference is for you.


I think most new llama owners don't handle theirs enough. Maybe they're put off by the size.

I spend a lot of time with my llamas and insist they interact with me.  When one is born, every day for the first few weeks, I make it do its "lessons".  I make it stand still and pick up each foot, saying "Foot please" and will say "Ok" and release it once the baby is still.  I also make it let me touch its tail and hold its head, and finally make it stand still without pulling away.  After about 2 weeks, they're a lot more tractable.

The secret with llamas (and probably alpacas too) is that they're herd animals and they will follow a confident leader.  You just have to act like you're the one in charge.
 
2022-07-02 6:12:51 PM  
Raising Alpaca's the closest thing to a pyramid scam in the farming/ranching world. A friends father got caught up in it about 13 years ago, and after a few years they realized the fur brought nothing near what it cost to feed them, the only way to make money was to sell new born breeding females to other rubes. Couldn't sell the 40+ herd, couldn't afford to feed the herd, it was just a bad time for all those involved. My friend doesn't like to talk about the choices his father made.
 
2022-07-02 6:16:00 PM  
Well, as long as the lady is paying, why not take the vicuna?
Youtube Uw9Ski5DJMA
 
2022-07-02 6:18:08 PM  
Has anyone checked to see how they taste?   Alpaca Burger for the rubes.  Alpaca Steaks for the rich farks.

Just need an Alpaca Meat Influencer and, for cash, here I am.

Bout to tuck in to Alpaca bacon and eggs.  Yums and tasty!

Fixing alpaca burgers for the crew.  Can't wait to see cheese paca on a toasted bun!
 
2022-07-02 6:21:29 PM  

Summoner101: gameshowhost: If heading out to a picnic, alpaca lunch.

Marmoset knock you out


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-07-02 6:24:57 PM  

lurkey: The real money's in alpaca feed and medicine.


Stop copying me..
Camp lejeune
shiat on.our dollars
 
2022-07-02 6:25:45 PM  

cew-smoke: alpaca fleece is f--king amazing. Stuff made with it sells like gangbusters at the fairs and markets we frequent.


Farkin Charlie: Raising Alpacas is the closest thing to a pyramid scam in the farming/ranching world. [...] they realized the fur brought nothing near what it cost to feed them,


OK, these two statements seem contradictory.  However, cew-smoke did not mention the profit margin on items made with alpaca fleece.  Maybe they're selling things at cost, and the alpaca farm is not a profit center but a hobby?  It seems as if people posting here have had wildly different experiences with these camelids.  Don't look at me, though, the closest I've gotten to a llama was seeing the guard llamas if I drove by the MSU sheep pastures.
 
2022-07-02 6:25:51 PM  

iheartscotch: Article appears to be satire.


At the bottom of TFA it's implied that it's satire but that's usually somewhat entertaining. This wasn't
 
2022-07-02 6:27:46 PM  

BFletch651: Buried lede:

Don't start an alpaca farm.
Seriously. Don't waste the prime years of your life tending to these curly-haired, evil camels. ♦


Evil camels is redundant
 
2022-07-02 6:28:02 PM  

cew-smoke: foxy_canuck: cew-smoke: shmeckle: dammit just give me a login: Don't we have a resident alpaca (or was it llamas?) farmer or 2 here on Fark?

Yup.  I have llamas and had a few alpacas.  With the exception of one who spent a lot of time with my llamas & learned some manners, the alpacas were nasty.    I got rid of them fast.

About 20 years ago was when there was a big sales pitch about alpacas, "the huggable investment".  We llama farmers knew it was bullshiat.  The same thing happened a decade earlier with llamas (and emus).

People bought into it while the hype was raging, and then most lost a bunch of money because it's just not a good idea to invest in anything that poops.  I started farming right after that happened to the llama market and loved it.  They're great animals.  My herd got up to over 100 because I was doing rescue.  I would take in peoples' herds of 10 or more at a time from people who were giving them away.

A few years ago, a friend realized she was going broke raising her alpacas and gave me half a dozen.  I ended up trading them to someone else for the same number of llamas and vowed no more alpacas on my farm.

Yeah, me experience is the dead opposite of yours. Alpacas are way easier to handle and far more sociable. Not sure if you've had strangely bad luck or if I've had lots of good luck. And I mean lots. I spend a lot of time with a lot of alpacas. Meat sells well and alpaca fleece is f--king amazing.  Stuff made with it sells like gangbusters at the fairs and markets we frequent. Llamas are assholes. Not sure what the difference is for you.

Do you spin the fibre for wool or do fleece?

Depends on my brother's mood. It's his animals. I just come out and help him. We do spin a lot of it into yarn to make clothes. But sometimes we use it to make fleece jackets and the like.


Cant find a menthol
 
2022-07-02 6:29:21 PM  

iheartscotch: Article appears to be satire.


Apparently.
They'd be better off if they reran some Calvin Trillin columns.


/ reading a CT anthology
// quite good
/// three slashies for good luck
 
2022-07-02 6:30:07 PM  

deadsanta: foxy_canuck: dammit just give me a login: Don't we have a resident alpaca (or was it llamas?) farmer or 2 here on Fark?

Here I am!

I know it's a silly article but...

Alpacas are cheap.  If he paid $15000 for an Alpaca he got fleeced (sorry).  We paid like $600 Canadian for 5 of them, all but one with amazing fleece and good breeding stock if we wanted to breed.  For $15000 we could have bought a large commercial herd.

I know that I know far less than you about raising alpacas, and anything farm-related really, but even topical searches note that alpacas can run between $3000-$20000 for high quality breed stock, or wool, or pedigree alpacas. That's for American and Canadian purchases, you cannot export them legally from Peru anymore (where author claimed to have purchased them), so there must be a high demand for those breeds, not to mention transport fees and associated costs of moving livestock over international borders.

It sounds like you got a deal, or maybe you yourself are the one being fleeced, and are passing on your fleecing to your customers, additional fleecees in the multilevel market-farming scheme that is alpaca farming.  Truly it sounds like a horrifying nightmare, top to bottom.

Here's hoping you come to your senses as the author did and seek support and possibly professional help.

/it was satire all the way down btw.


Got a question
U think I'm not as smart or stronger

Lol
U gave up
 
2022-07-02 6:31:00 PM  

deadsanta: foxy_canuck: dammit just give me a login: Don't we have a resident alpaca (or was it llamas?) farmer or 2 here on Fark?

Here I am!

I know it's a silly article but...

Alpacas are cheap.  If he paid $15000 for an Alpaca he got fleeced (sorry).  We paid like $600 Canadian for 5 of them, all but one with amazing fleece and good breeding stock if we wanted to breed.  For $15000 we could have bought a large commercial herd.

I know that I know far less than you about raising alpacas, and anything farm-related really, but even topical searches note that alpacas can run between $3000-$20000 for high quality breed stock, or wool, or pedigree alpacas. That's for American and Canadian purchases, you cannot export them legally from Peru anymore (where author claimed to have purchased them), so there must be a high demand for those breeds, not to mention transport fees and associated costs of moving livestock over international borders.

It sounds like you got a deal, or maybe you yourself are the one being fleeced, and are passing on your fleecing to your customers, additional fleecees in the multilevel market-farming scheme that is alpaca farming.  Truly it sounds like a horrifying nightmare, top to bottom.

Here's hoping you come to your senses as the author did and seek support and possibly professional help.

/it was satire all the way down btw.


Take If I waited
 
2022-07-02 6:32:38 PM  

danceswithcrows: [Fark user image image 613x609]

Llamas sound more exciting, though.


Having worked in factories that could kill me if I don't act carefully, the llamas sound way more exciting.

I don't think I could work a job that didn't come with a death and dismemberment policy anymore.
 
2022-07-02 6:35:33 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-07-02 6:37:30 PM  

foxy_canuck: Fighting teeth...  Yeah that's real.  They use them to try and castrate rival males.


Well, I certainly wasn't aware of the extent of gay blowjobs in Alpacatown, so much so that the guys would try to give other guys a BJ Surprise.
 
2022-07-02 6:38:06 PM  
There was a farm near Midway, Ky that raised cattle, bison, alpacas, and camels. Several years ago now, they threw in the towel and now just raise cattle.
 
2022-07-02 6:39:04 PM  

Billy Liar: [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/Uw9Ski5DJMA]


Billy Liar: [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/Uw9Ski5DJMA]


You read my mind.
 
2022-07-02 6:41:30 PM  
Now I know why they spit, I thought they just didn't like us.
 
2022-07-02 6:46:13 PM  
i.imgflip.comView Full Size


BOOOOOOO!
 
2022-07-02 6:49:55 PM  

foxy_canuck: If he paid $15000 for an Alpaca he got fleeced (sorry).


This is the New Yorker.  The writer has never been within 50 feet of a farm animal.  The special kind of prima facie self-conceit needed to write for the New Yorker is so removed from the world in general that it can be irreparably tainted by something as down to earth as being in the vicinity of a farm animal.

If you read between the lines, what this guy actually did is sink his money in bitcoin.  Now he's trying to make some kind of ironic point about bitcoin by metaphor to alpaca farming.
 
2022-07-02 6:52:50 PM  

Day_Old_Dutchie: [i.imgflip.com image 500x528]

BOOOOOOO!


It should be "Alpaca my bags".
Saying "I'll alpaca" just ruins the joke, because the "al" is supposed to sound like "I'll".
 
2022-07-02 6:55:01 PM  

aerojockey: foxy_canuck: If he paid $15000 for an Alpaca he got fleeced (sorry).

This is the New Yorker.  The writer has never been within 50 feet of a farm animal.  The special kind of prima facie self-conceit needed to write for the New Yorker is so removed from the world in general that it can be irreparably tainted by something as down to earth as being in the vicinity of a farm animal.

If you read between the lines, what this guy actually did is sink his money in bitcoin.  Now he's trying to make some kind of ironic point about bitcoin by metaphor to alpaca farming.


He probably didn't sink his money into bitcoin or alpacas.
It's a joke article. The bitcoin is the punchline.
 
2022-07-02 7:02:14 PM  

chitownmike: iheartscotch: Article appears to be satire.

At the bottom of TFA it's implied that it's satire but that's usually somewhat entertaining. This wasn't


It's The New Yorker, thereal-life equivalent of Sensible Chuckle Magazine.
 
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