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(Ars Technica)   NASA schedules astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams to fly Boeing on December. No word if they will get hazard pay   (arstechnica.com) divider line
    More: Murica, International Space Station, Space Shuttle, Boeing's Starliner spacecraft, successful test flight, launch date, Mir, NASA's internal schedules, space station  
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329 clicks; posted to STEM » on 01 Jul 2022 at 11:53 PM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



18 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-07-02 12:35:08 AM  
WTF did those two do to be crash test dummies on the Boeing launch?
Has to suck to be told the valuable astronauts get to go up on Dragons and will meet you there.
 
2022-07-02 12:39:06 AM  
Butch and Suni?
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-07-02 12:49:22 AM  

Dryad: WTF did those two do to be crash test dummies on the Boeing launch?
Has to suck to be told the valuable astronauts get to go up on Dragons and will meet you there.


from what I understand, Starliner is a smoother ride than Dragon. For all of its other comforts, Dragon has harsher G-pulls than even Soyuz.
 
2022-07-02 1:02:31 AM  
I'm sure the capsule MCAS will be working and well documented.  No need for re-training.
 
2022-07-02 1:51:31 AM  
by the way, there's a Virgin Orbit launch going on right now

Virgin Orbit's Straight Up Mission
Youtube O662GsLrdhc
 
2022-07-02 3:11:36 AM  
Far safer than trying to fly SpaceX's starship.
 
2022-07-02 3:23:49 AM  
If it's Boeing, they might not be going.
 
2022-07-02 4:15:02 AM  

Obscene_CNN: Far safer than trying to fly SpaceX's starship.


Is today opposite day Ivan?
 
2022-07-02 4:15:44 AM  
I met Butch in a bathroom of the Boeing building here in Houston. There weren't many people in the building and I had to take a major poo so I ran into the first bathroom I saw and barely made it before anarchy broke loose. Butch walked in at the height of my symphony and was laughing in the stall next to me. I didn't know who he was until I was washing my hands and recognized him (there is a massive banner with all of the active astronauts on it in the front lobby). He was totally cool and we of course talked about poo in space, if you ever get diarrhea, how that works, how does farting work, and if you can get constipated. Very scientific and high level stuff. He knows one of my friends who might be going up to the ISS next year.

/CSB
 
2022-07-02 6:23:22 AM  

The Bestest: Dryad: WTF did those two do to be crash test dummies on the Boeing launch?
Has to suck to be told the valuable astronauts get to go up on Dragons and will meet you there.

from what I understand, Starliner is a smoother ride than Dragon. For all of its other comforts, Dragon has harsher G-pulls than even Soyuz.


The current Starliner is so smooth, you don't even feel like you're moving.
 
2022-07-02 7:14:17 AM  

ISO15693: Obscene_CNN: Far safer than trying to fly SpaceX's starship.

Is today opposite day Ivan?


He's right. Starship will be more dangerous. This is not a attack on SpaceX.

Capsules in low-Earth orbit have been done since the 60s. SpaceX's starship is new and cutting edge. No one has done anything like it. It also won't have an escape tower or an equivalent. And if they take off from Earth, the number of rocket engines will be huge compared to anything that has not gone boom.  It is going to be a long time before anything like starship/superheavy can said to be as safe as a capsule/conventional rocket. And that also ignores that Starship will be going to the Moon where you won't have a teams of engineers and technicians on site as you would at a pad.  What Starship is supposed to do is inherently more dangerous by far than either Boeing's Starliner or SpaceX's Dragon are supposed to do. As I have already stated, capsules have been done for a long time. The rockets both fly one have proven incredibly reliable as well. ULA has never had a failed launch. And SpaceX's Falcon 9 has had two losses, one one the ground and one being launched. Both those were early in the program and the rocket has flown well over a hundred times since without incident.
 
2022-07-02 8:08:36 AM  

Mad_Radhu: If it's Boeing, they might not be going.


If it ain't SpaceX, I ain't....     day sex?
 
2022-07-02 9:09:43 AM  

the money is in the banana stand: I met Butch in a bathroom of the Boeing building here in Houston. There weren't many people in the building and I had to take a major poo so I ran into the first bathroom I saw and barely made it before anarchy broke loose. Butch walked in at the height of my symphony and was laughing in the stall next to me. I didn't know who he was until I was washing my hands and recognized him (there is a massive banner with all of the active astronauts on it in the front lobby). He was totally cool and we of course talked about poo in space, if you ever get diarrhea, how that works, how does farting work, and if you can get constipated. Very scientific and high level stuff. He knows one of my friends who might be going up to the ISS next year.

/CSB


Well?  How do they deal with Montezuma's Revenge?
 
2022-07-02 9:10:53 AM  

drewsclues: Mad_Radhu: If it's Boeing, they might not be going.

If it ain't SpaceX, I ain't....     day sex?


If it's SpaceX, please, let them fly my ex?
 
2022-07-02 9:19:25 AM  

The Bestest: Dryad: WTF did those two do to be crash test dummies on the Boeing launch?
Has to suck to be told the valuable astronauts get to go up on Dragons and will meet you there.

from what I understand, Starliner is a smoother ride than Dragon. For all of its other comforts, Dragon has harsher G-pulls than even Soyuz.


But both Dragon and Soyuz have one big advantage - they are built by companies that remember how to spaceflight
Boeing lost all that institutional knowledge years ago, but still has all the baggage of being Boeing starting from first principles, and so far its been a 100% predictable shiatshow.
 
2022-07-02 9:25:50 AM  

TheMysteriousStranger: ULA has never had a failed launch. And SpaceX's Falcon 9 has had two losses, one one the ground and one being launched. Both those were early in the program and the rocket has flown well over a hundred times since without incident.


Technically true, only because ULA used old, proven rockets that were developed before they called themselves ULA.
They had a LOT of booms before those platforms were stable.
Falcon development only having 2 was incredible, and virtually unthinkable for a clean sheet design.
-
/Good way to spin "ULA is using heavy, obsolete ICBM platforms dating from before most of us were born" though
 
2022-07-02 9:27:25 AM  
Looks like Virgin's launch was a success (I couldn't stay up for the whole thing), meaning they officially have a better record than Astra now.
 
2022-07-02 1:41:39 PM  

The Bestest: Looks like Virgin's launch was a success (I couldn't stay up for the whole thing), meaning they officially have a better record than Astra now.


oh wow, Astra's record is worse than I thought..

This successful launch makes Virgin 4-1 (4-0 with paying customers).
Astra is 2-7.
 
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