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(NHK World (Japan))   Japanese researchers say they have successfully filmed a giant rare deep-sea fish in the Pacific, an 8-foot-4 "yokozuna iwashi," slowly swimming towards the camera and biting a bait basket. They're gonna need a bigger sushi chef   (www3.nhk.or.jp) divider line
    More: Cool, Orders of magnitude, Japanese researchers, Ocean, Deep sea fish, Japan, giant rare deep-sea fish, central Japan, Tokyo  
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1830 clicks; posted to STEM » on 01 Jul 2022 at 4:05 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-07-01 2:32:12 PM  
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2022-07-01 4:06:14 PM  
So, why do we not use IR cameras for deep sea stuff and insist on visible light?
 
2022-07-01 4:16:32 PM  
The Simpsons Poison Blowfish Sushi
Youtube -_SU_Ikab5g
 
2022-07-01 4:23:37 PM  
I got your giant slickhead right here! ;-)
 
2022-07-01 4:24:41 PM  
Why Japan cares: It could be endangered and they can make ice cream out of it.
 
2022-07-01 4:45:39 PM  
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2022-07-01 4:56:34 PM  

Concrete Donkey: So, why do we not use IR cameras for deep sea stuff and insist on visible light?


IR is severely limited underwater. The wavelength is very long and easily absorbed by the water. This is why things that are visibly red are the first color to "disappear" and look black when you dive underwater. Even if it could penetrate, almost everything would be close to water temp anyways, so it would be hard to see any variation.

/not a science talking guy
//I have way too much useless trivia tucked away
///I can be insufferable to listen to when I've had a few drinks
 
2022-07-01 5:41:39 PM  
Well, I learned something today.

I didn't know that yokozuna meant "grand champion".
I always thought it meant "big fat fark".
 
2022-07-01 5:55:46 PM  
I love NHK. They speak such perfect English. And I found it amusing when they had white people speaking in an odd almost overdone manner when speaking Japanese , for language lessons. Anyhow, there's just so much we most likely will never know about what lives in the really deep oceans.
 
2022-07-01 6:57:11 PM  
It was delicious.
 
2022-07-01 7:01:19 PM  
SUGOI

DEKAI

 
2022-07-01 7:32:29 PM  

Concrete Donkey: So, why do we not use IR cameras for deep sea stuff and insist on visible light?


Fark user imageView Full Size


See how there's not even a hint of the animal below water level?

And those are whales, who run much hotter than fish. IT is worse than the visible spectrum underwater.
 
2022-07-01 7:33:18 PM  

Boudyro: Concrete Donkey: So, why do we not use IR cameras for deep sea stuff and insist on visible light?

[Fark user image image 320x320]

See how there's not even a hint of the animal below water level?

And those are whales, who run much hotter than fish. IT is worse than the visible spectrum underwater.


IR not IT dammit.
 
2022-07-01 8:13:45 PM  
So the Japanese CAN research marine life without killing and eating it. Now they have no excuse for their whale "research" vessels.
 
2022-07-01 8:19:53 PM  

seanpaul.bobadilla: So the Japanese CAN research marine life without killing and eating it. Now they have no excuse for their whale "research" vessels.


They don't know if it is endangered yet. Once they find out it is it is game on. Slickhead sushi
 
2022-07-01 11:04:27 PM  

King Something: SUGOIDEKAI


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2022-07-02 2:41:33 AM  

leeksfromchichis: King Something: SUGOIDEKAI

[encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com image 640x323]


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2022-07-02 4:07:37 AM  

resident dystopian: Well, I learned something today.

I didn't know that yokozuna meant "grand champion".
I always thought it meant "big fat fark".


It's kinda both though, isn't it?
 
2022-07-02 6:56:14 AM  
FTA:  "He said many things are still unknown about the deep sea."

Let's keep using it as a garbage dump and toxic waste site.
 
2022-07-02 11:03:38 AM  

Boudyro: Boudyro: Concrete Donkey: So, why do we not use IR cameras for deep sea stuff and insist on visible light?

[Fark user image image 320x320]

See how there's not even a hint of the animal below water level?

And those are whales, who run much hotter than fish. IT is worse than the visible spectrum underwater.

IR not IT dammit.


It's cool; IT guys are pretty useless under water, too.
 
2022-07-02 11:22:33 AM  
> Deep-sea camera captures giant 'yokozuna iwashi' in Pacific

The Japanese are not that creative  in inventing common names for animals.
'Yokozuna iwashi' basically means "jumbo sardine", but the word used for "jumbo" is the same as the top sumo title.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sumo#Professional_sumo
Above the maegashira are the three champion or titleholder ranks, called the san'yaku, which are not numbered. These are, in ascending order, komusubi (小結), sekiwake (関脇), and ōzeki (大関). At the pinnacle of the ranking system is the rank of yokozuna (横綱).[23]

Fish in the genera Alepocephalidae are commonly called "slickheads" because they have no scales on their heads (but in Japan)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alepocephalidae
In Japanese they are known as Sekitori Iwashi (関取鰯, "Massive Sardine").[3]

That word doesn't simply mean "massive"
A sekitori (関取) is a rikishi (力士, sumo wrestler) who is ranked in one of the top two professional divisions: makuuchi and jūryō.[1]

There are probably enough sumo terms that they can invent names for lots of related fish.

and the yokozuna slickhead (as some Japanese want it to be called in English) is scientifically Narcetes shonanmaruae
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Narcetes_shonanmaruae

If an even bigger slickhead species is found what will it be called?
Godzilla sardine?
 
2022-07-02 3:32:53 PM  

FigPucker: Concrete Donkey: So, why do we not use IR cameras for deep sea stuff and insist on visible light?

IR is severely limited underwater. The wavelength is very long and easily absorbed by the water. This is why things that are visibly red are the first color to "disappear" and look black when you dive underwater. Even if it could penetrate, almost everything would be close to water temp anyways, so it would be hard to see any variation.

/not a science talking guy
//I have way too much useless trivia tucked away
///I can be insufferable to listen to when I've had a few drinks


The visible spectrum is really the only decently transparent zone for seawater... once you're out of that range, you have to go very low frequency or very, very high frequency/energy to achieve any penetration, both ends of which have issues that make them unsuitable for any imaging.
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2022-07-02 3:38:32 PM  

AdrienVeidt: And those are whales, who run much hotter than fish. IT is worse than the visible spectrum underwater.

IR not IT dammit.

It's cool; IT guys are pretty useless under water, too.


Not if you want those emails from your wife, sailor....

/former underwater IT guy - ET1(SS)
//you don't, it'll just make it that much worse when you get back and find out she's been cheating on you since about 30 seconds after the ship's whistle blew
 
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