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(8 News Now)   Remember back in the good old days when Lake Mead was so full of water it was a problem? 1983 does   (8newsnow.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Colorado River, Hoover Dam, rising waters, late June, water level, similar problem, record levels, KLAS-TV reporter Mark Fierro  
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3949 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Jun 2022 at 5:20 PM (13 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-06-28 1:49:58 PM  
Nice to know at least one problem has been solved.
 
2022-06-28 3:39:26 PM  
I remember in 1985 talking about this in my 6th grade class. Some were suggesting that we'd have to rename it Hoover Falls.

Thankfully, crisis was averted with the mega-drought!
 
2022-06-28 5:22:31 PM  
It is beyond me how a headline (TFA not fark headline) can describe the exact opposite problem as "similar."
 
2022-06-28 5:23:46 PM  
Well geez, the solution is obvious. Just mix 1985's Lake Mead with 2022's Lake Mead, split the water volume, and both time periods will be happy.

Why am I the only one who thinks of these things?
 
2022-06-28 5:23:58 PM  

Dafatone: It is beyond me how a headline (TFA not fark headline) can describe the exact opposite problem as "similar."


As in "a problem", or as in an extreme.
 
2022-06-28 5:24:43 PM  

special20: Dafatone: It is beyond me how a headline (TFA not fark headline) can describe the exact opposite problem as "similar."

As in "a problem", or as in an extreme.


Oh wait, I said I was sick of explaining shiat to you morons...

carry on.
 
2022-06-28 5:29:30 PM  
Fun fact: All the people in that news story are probably dead now.
 
2022-06-28 5:31:22 PM  

abhorrent1: Fun fact: All the people in that news story are probably in that lake now.


FTFY
 
2022-06-28 5:31:29 PM  

EdgeRunner: Well geez, the solution is obvious. Just mix 1985's Lake Mead with 2022's Lake Mead, split the water volume, and both time periods will be happy.

Why am I the only one who thinks of these things?


So you want to build a sort of "Time Tunnel" between them?
 
2022-06-28 5:32:34 PM  
Spring 1983 I was following the Dead out west, and saw a show in Las Vegas. Next day we went to Hoover Dam, and the amount of water left us in awe. It's really hard to believe what has come to pass there.
 
2022-06-28 5:34:51 PM  

Creepy Lurker Guy: EdgeRunner: Well geez, the solution is obvious. Just mix 1985's Lake Mead with 2022's Lake Mead, split the water volume, and both time periods will be happy.

Why am I the only one who thinks of these things?

So you want to build a sort of "Time Tunnel" between them?


More like a "time funnel". Because it's redirecting liquid, and also because it has the word "fun" in it. I think that'll be a big selling point! People like fun!
 
2022-06-28 5:38:57 PM  
c.tenor.comView Full Size
 
2022-06-28 5:46:13 PM  

abhorrent1: Fun fact: All the people in that news story are probably dead now.


What? 1983 was only 39 years ago. If you were 30 then you wouldn't even be 70 today. What age do you think most people die at?
 
2022-06-28 5:47:24 PM  

EdgeRunner: Well geez, the solution is obvious. Just mix 1985's Lake Mead with 2022's Lake Mead, split the water volume, and both time periods will be happy.

Why am I the only one who thinks of these things?


So they both get 2003 Lake Mead?

https://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/news/topstory/2003/0820lakemead.html

The idea that this warning would effect the slightest change is just so adorable!
 
2022-06-28 5:49:00 PM  
failures?

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-06-28 5:49:43 PM  
I mean, if you want to complain about misaligned nipnops, I get it. But that's hardly a failure.
 
2022-06-28 5:54:38 PM  
Too bad they did not redirect all that water into the aquifers.
 
2022-06-28 5:58:47 PM  
It wasn't a problem for Lake Mead. The excess water just went over the spillways as designed to do. If anything, excess water is beneficial for electricity production because you can run those turbines at 100% capacity and use that power in place of things like coal, oil, or natural gas.

The flooding almost destroyed the Glenn Canyon Dam, though.
 
2022-06-28 6:02:09 PM  
This is the perfect opportunity to dismantle Hoover and Glen Canyon dams.
 
2022-06-28 6:03:57 PM  

To The Escape Zeppelin!: abhorrent1: Fun fact: All the people in that news story are probably dead now.

What? 1983 was only 39 years ago. If you were 30 then you wouldn't even be 70 today. What age do you think most people die at?


Historically speaking, this event went down at approximately the time that the oldest millennials were getting their first taste of avocado toast.
 
2022-06-28 6:13:59 PM  

winedrinkingman: Too bad they did not redirect all that water into the aquifers.


Actually, they did redirect it. They have been pumping water into the local aquifer for years. I live in Las Vegas, and have a well instead of city water, so I'm familiar with this.

Back in 1983, I went down to the dam to watch the water going over the spillway. They had the big gates raised up so the lake was at it's absolute level. Even so, about 2-3 feet of water was going over and into the big tunnel at the bottom of the spillway. It was spectacular.
 
2022-06-28 6:15:39 PM  

special20: Dafatone: It is beyond me how a headline (TFA not fark headline) can describe the exact opposite problem as "similar."

As in "a problem", or as in an extreme.


No as in lower power producction, closed boat ramps, boating hazards hazards and businesses closing... all similarities mentioned in the article.  Same problems different cause
 
2022-06-28 6:17:00 PM  

To The Escape Zeppelin!: abhorrent1: Fun fact: All the people in that news story are probably dead now.

What? 1983 was only 39 years ago. If you were 30 then you wouldn't even be 70 today. What age do you think most people die at?


The people in the news video were not 30
 
2022-06-28 6:17:42 PM  

mrmopar5287: If anything, excess water is beneficial for electricity production...


FTFA: In 1983 the BOR cut back generator use because of the amount of water pouring down the spillways into the Colorado River. To equalize the water output heading toward Lake Mohave less water was run through the generators.
 
2022-06-28 6:18:37 PM  

To The Escape Zeppelin!: abhorrent1: Fun fact: All the people in that news story are probably dead now.

What? 1983 was only 39 years ago. If you were 30 then you wouldn't even be 70 today. What age do you think most people die at?


40...definitely 40.
 
2022-06-28 6:18:58 PM  

gameshowhost: failures?

[Fark user image 300x600]


They forgot their tickets. What a pair of losers!
 
2022-06-28 6:25:20 PM  

fatassbastard: mrmopar5287: If anything, excess water is beneficial for electricity production...

FTFA: In 1983 the BOR cut back generator use because of the amount of water pouring down the spillways into the Colorado River. To equalize the water output heading toward Lake Mohave less water was run through the generators.


Well, shiat. I hadn't read that part of the article and I'm obviously wrong. It does make sense that the water flowing over the spillways would combine with 100% of power generation water flow and cause problems downstream.
 
2022-06-28 6:25:45 PM  
My questions are these, and I am sure that if I were to google it I would find the answer, but I am too lazy (and mellowed out with pain meds) today. If the levels were so high back then, how many years of megadrought have they had to bring the levels down to where they are today? How many years of extreme rain/snowmelt would it take to bring the lake back up to normal levels?
 
2022-06-28 6:26:32 PM  

rfenster: To The Escape Zeppelin!: abhorrent1: Fun fact: All the people in that news story are probably dead now.

What? 1983 was only 39 years ago. If you were 30 then you wouldn't even be 70 today. What age do you think most people die at?

40...definitely 40.


My research says 30.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logan%27s_Run_(film)
 
2022-06-28 6:31:13 PM  

Warmachine999: If the levels were so high back then, how many years of megadrought have they had to bring the levels down to where they are today?


39.

How many years of extreme rain/snowmelt would it take to bring the lake back up to normal levels?

Fark user imageView Full Size


Thr-r-r-ree.
 
2022-06-28 6:35:41 PM  

Warmachine999: How many years of extreme rain/snowmelt would it take to bring the lake back up to normal levels?


It would probably take at least 5 years of rain/snow at about 120% of normal to bring the lakes back up to average or above average. A decade or more would be required to fill them up.

There just isn't the ability to have one good, huge, mega, unprecedented year of snowfall to bring all the water at once. Such a thing is not possible, or at least it would boggle my mind to think it could ever happen.
 
2022-06-28 6:41:00 PM  
rfenster
What? 1983 was only 39 years ago. If you were 30 then you wouldn't even be 70 today. What age do you think most people die at?

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-06-28 6:49:00 PM  

ctighe2353: special20: Dafatone: It is beyond me how a headline (TFA not fark headline) can describe the exact opposite problem as "similar."

As in "a problem", or as in an extreme.

No as in lower power producction, closed boat ramps, boating hazards hazards and businesses closing... all similarities mentioned in the article.  Same problems different cause


STFU article reading wise ass.
 
2022-06-28 6:56:32 PM  

abhorrent1: Fun fact: All the people in that news story are probably dead now.


Im not!  Got to watch the spill way spill.
 
2022-06-28 7:00:48 PM  
I remember just 5 years ago when my state had the rainiest winter on record. The spillway at Oroville reservoir failed and thousands of people below the dam were evacuated because they feared the dam might fail. 3.5 million+ acre feet of water. Now, less than half full, extreme drought. Mt state is doing it wrong.
 
2022-06-28 7:03:08 PM  

EdgeRunner: Well geez, the solution is obvious. Just mix 1985's Lake Mead with 2022's Lake Mead, split the water volume, and both time periods will be happy.

Why am I the only one who thinks of these things?


You have to be more practical. There's only so much water you can fit in a DeLorean.
 
2022-06-28 7:08:29 PM  
Desert almonds solved that problem but they never stopped growing them after the problem was solved.
 
2022-06-28 7:40:58 PM  

REO-Weedwagon: This is the perfect opportunity to dismantle Hoover and Glen Canyon dams.


Care to foot the bill for their removal?
 
2022-06-28 7:42:53 PM  
Also, Glen Canyon came very close to "self-removal" back then, anyway
 
2022-06-28 7:59:30 PM  
I'm beginning to think building lakes and cities in the desert might not have been the sharpest of ideas.
 
2022-06-28 8:22:41 PM  

The Irresponsible Captain: I'm beginning to think building lakes and cities in the desert might not have been the sharpest of ideas.


Sure, let's convert some east coast farm or forest land to high density housing and relocate people.
 
2022-06-28 8:48:34 PM  
Lake's too full. Lake's too empty. There is just no satisfying you people is there?
 
2022-06-28 9:08:11 PM  

To The Escape Zeppelin!: abhorrent1: Fun fact: All the people in that news story are probably dead now.

What? 1983 was only 39 years ago. If you were 30 then you wouldn't even be 70 today. What age do you think most people die at?


With American healthcare? Probably 50.
 
2022-06-28 10:24:11 PM  

gameshowhost: failures?

[Fark user image image 300x600]


Clothes? Fanny packs?
 
2022-06-28 11:26:15 PM  

gameshowhost: failures?

[Fark user image image 300x600]


Faliures?
 
2022-06-28 11:28:48 PM  

gameshowhost: failures?

[Fark user image image 300x600]


A 40+ festival?
 
2022-06-28 11:37:55 PM  

Warmachine999: My questions are these, and I am sure that if I were to google it I would find the answer, but I am too lazy (and mellowed out with pain meds) today. If the levels were so high back then, how many years of megadrought have they had to bring the levels down to where they are today? How many years of extreme rain/snowmelt would it take to bring the lake back up to normal levels?


The lake was last nearly full in 2000. Over these 22 years, it has gone from 25 million acre-feet (MAF) of storage to 7 MAF - a decline of 18 MAF over 22 years, which is ~0.8 MAF / year.

Similar numbers for Lake Powell, which lost 15.5 MAF / 22 years. Combined, that's 1.5 MAF / year.

For comparison, about 16.5 MAF/year are allocated from the Colorado river, representing about a 9% shortfall / over-allocation on average.

That number was determined based on historical annual rainfall. There are arguments that that number was calculated based on unusually wet years, and that the rainfall of the last 20 years is likely to indicate the future average.

Setting that aside and using the historical number:

How long it would take to restore those 34 MAF depends on how big a year we got. There is no upper bound on rain - if we somehow got 310% of a normal rain year, both could be filled in one go. (There are other reservoirs to fill as well, but Mead and Powell are a very significant proportion of total storage).

The best we've ever gotten was 180% of average (the year TFA refers to) - it would take about 3 of those in a row to top everything off. I wouldn't place any bets on that happening.

If we hit 'shortage condition 3', deliveries are reduced by about 9% - if we stayed at that reduced level and got a run of historically average years, it would take about the same amount of time - call it 22 years to return to full.
 
2022-06-29 12:50:23 AM  

Warmachine999: My questions are these, and I am sure that if I were to google it I would find the answer, but I am too lazy (and mellowed out with pain meds) today. If the levels were so high back then, how many years of megadrought have they had to bring the levels down to where they are today? How many years of extreme rain/snowmelt would it take to bring the lake back up to normal levels?


The "Dust Bowl" years were 1930-36. Figure 2 years on each end just to play it safe.

Of course, CO2 levels were far lower in 1936, so the recovery that occurred then might not happen now.

IOW, no one knows what a "typical" extreme rain or extreme drought should look like, so it's anyone's guess. The smart thing would to err on the side of caution and prepare for the worst, but we saw how well treating COVID as "the worst" turned out.

We'll find out shortly that MAGAts have been watering lawns and running their household faucets 24/7 because the liberals said there was a drought and to conserve water.
 
2022-06-29 2:21:19 AM  
Last Week Tonight's episode covered this sorta.

https://youtu.be/jtxew5XUVbQ?list=RDCMUC3XTzVzaHQEd30rQbuvCtTQ
 
2022-06-29 2:25:46 AM  
Also just learned how to put put video links in my comments.
/long time lurker
//Weeners(s)
/// three for the win


Water: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
Youtube jtxew5XUVbQ
 
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