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(The Register)   DOS is refusing the command to END   (theregister.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, DOS, Emulator, Microsoft Windows, Operating system, X86-64, Novell, MS-DOS, X86  
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1505 clicks; posted to STEM » on 28 Jun 2022 at 11:20 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-06-28 9:18:21 AM  
Huh.  I didn't know about DOSBox-X.  I'mma have to play with that a ton later.  Looks like it does everything DOSBox does and a butt-ton more.
 
2022-06-28 9:21:32 AM  
At my old job, we had a legacy software that required DOS older than v. 6. We didn't need it often, but when we needed it, we *really* needed it.

We kept one laptop that had swappable drive bays and a 3.5" drive in that bay. And a DOS 5 boot disk.

I think the hardware we were using it on finally hit EOL and we dumped it all.
 
2022-06-28 9:52:28 AM  
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2022-06-28 11:40:05 AM  
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2022-06-28 11:46:53 AM  
10 PRINT "GOODBYE WORLD"
20 GOTO 10
 
2022-06-28 11:48:16 AM  
Having written at least one terminate and stay resident (TSR) DOS device driver I can appreciate the fact that it just won't die.
 
2022-06-28 11:59:44 AM  

fragMasterFlash: Having written at least one terminate and stay resident (TSR) DOS device driver I can appreciate the fact that it just won't die.


Damn brings back memories. CSB time.

When I was a undergrad student, I used to love C programming and read through some books that introduced me to TSR and they were great fun. Some one in my school was trying to develop a DOS interface for administering a test and they wanted to show a running countdown clock while the program is waiting for users input. The instructor for that course was a dogmatic moron who read in the book that C programs on DOS are single threaded and argued that what they wanted was impossible.

Cue me introducing my friends to concept of TSR and I helped them put a timer on the program (some of the code had to be written in C/ asm directives).

The look on the instructors face when they demoed the application is still something I remember 22 years later.

/CSB
 
2022-06-28 12:17:03 PM  

windozer: fragMasterFlash: Having written at least one terminate and stay resident (TSR) DOS device driver I can appreciate the fact that it just won't die.

Damn brings back memories. CSB time.

When I was a undergrad student, I used to love C programming and read through some books that introduced me to TSR and they were great fun. Some one in my school was trying to develop a DOS interface for administering a test and they wanted to show a running countdown clock while the program is waiting for users input. The instructor for that course was a dogmatic moron who read in the book that C programs on DOS are single threaded and argued that what they wanted was impossible.

Cue me introducing my friends to concept of TSR and I helped them put a timer on the program (some of the code had to be written in C/ asm directives).

The look on the instructors face when they demoed the application is still something I remember 22 years later.

/CSB


Kind of reminds me of when I took a programming course in college.  Now, I'm not saying the course was dogshiat, but part of our curriculum was learning a bit of Clipper.  This was the early 90s, Clipper was outdated even then.  It also included C and 8088 assembler, too, though, so at least that was fun.

Nevertheless part of our lesson included learning how to convert hex to decimal and back, but they had us do it by converting to binary first. It was in their textbook and everything.  I'd been programming on 6502 assembler for a bit at this point, and I'd never had to use binary as an intermediary.  I took one of the teachers aside and told him, look, you don't need binary for this.  You can just convert straight from one to the other with simple math.  He seemed confused and had no idea what I was talking about, but to his credit, he told me to write a sheet out on how to do that.  So I did.  I don't know if they ever updated their textbooks, but at least I was able to learn _them_ something.
 
2022-06-28 12:18:32 PM  
Get an old P1 or P2 system off eBay, install FreeDOS or MS DOS 6.2 on one of those removable SD card drive addons you can get for those. Spend the rest of your life living the good old days as the world around you falls in to a SaaS Windows 11 collective.
 
2022-06-28 12:22:03 PM  
One job I had kept a very old Sun workstation around because it had a compiled program that would not run on newer versions of the Sun O/S.  The only thing the program did was once a month upload a file to a bank.  Account name, protocol and password were all compiled into the program and no one wanted to tackle the mess.
 
2022-06-28 12:32:05 PM  

Nimbull: Get an old P1 or P2 system off eBay, install FreeDOS or MS DOS 6.2 on one of those removable SD card drive addons you can get for those. Spend the rest of your life living the good old days as the world around you falls in to a SaaS Windows 11 collective.


My good old days were mainly spent on Commodore systems. I was running CP/M on my C-128 years before I had to deal with MS-DOS.
 
2022-06-28 12:32:16 PM  

Psychopusher: Huh.  I didn't know about DOSBox-X.  I'mma have to play with that a ton later.  Looks like it does everything DOSBox does and a butt-ton more.


Fire up Dosbox,drop in QEMM and DoubleDOS and you now have InceptiOS
 
2022-06-28 12:41:38 PM  
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2022-06-28 1:13:56 PM  

Nimbull: Get an old P1 or P2 system off eBay, install FreeDOS or MS DOS 6.2 on one of those removable SD card drive addons you can get for those. Spend the rest of your life living the good old days as the world around you falls in to a SaaS Windows 11 collective.


don't forget to insall a little speaker so you can hear the modem sounds
 
2022-06-28 1:27:58 PM  

Psychopusher: Huh.  I didn't know about DOSBox-X.  I'mma have to play with that a ton later.  Looks like it does everything DOSBox does and a butt-ton more.


I like that it combines a ton of different DOSBox mods into one and that it is still under active development.  It is a noticeable improvement over the DOSBox-SVN version I had been previously using.
 
2022-06-28 1:50:54 PM  

Ivo Shandor: Nimbull: Get an old P1 or P2 system off eBay, install FreeDOS or MS DOS 6.2 on one of those removable SD card drive addons you can get for those. Spend the rest of your life living the good old days as the world around you falls in to a SaaS Windows 11 collective.

My good old days were mainly spent on Commodore systems. I was running CP/M on my C-128 years before I had to deal with MS-DOS.


I always thought it was a mistake that Commodore added the Z80 and CP/M ROM to the C128 as opposed to upgrading the CP/M cartridge that was available for the C64.  It added a lot to the bill of materials price and generally derailed the C128 from being a real update to the C64.

Just imagine if the C128 had a 65C816 compatible processor (like the IIgs had), an improved VIC with the 121-color palette of the TED, and some sort of improved sound (AHDSR oscillators, FM or PM synth, basic PCM sound, dual SIDs, etc...).  It would have filled the gap between the 8-bit series and Amiga much better.
 
2022-06-28 1:58:39 PM  

Dinjiin: I always thought it was a mistake that Commodore added the Z80 and CP/M ROM to the C128 as opposed to upgrading the CP/M cartridge that was available for the C64. It added a lot to the bill of materials price and generally derailed the C128 from being a real update to the C64.


Yeah, it was a weird machine. They were going for a dual-purpose home + business model where you could do your spreadsheets in CP/M with an 80-column text display, then flip over to 40-column color graphics to play games in the evening. And because the C-64 compatibility was so good, very few applications were developed for the native 128 mode.
 
2022-06-28 2:29:19 PM  

Ivo Shandor: Dinjiin: I always thought it was a mistake that Commodore added the Z80 and CP/M ROM to the C128 as opposed to upgrading the CP/M cartridge that was available for the C64. It added a lot to the bill of materials price and generally derailed the C128 from being a real update to the C64.

Yeah, it was a weird machine. They were going for a dual-purpose home + business model where you could do your spreadsheets in CP/M with an 80-column text display, then flip over to 40-column color graphics to play games in the evening. And because the C-64 compatibility was so good, very few applications were developed for the native 128 mode.


Problem was, the Z80 was getting a bit long in the tooth by '85.  Business machines were moving on to the i286 and Z8000 by then.

The Commodore 900, which used a Z8000, probably would have been a better fit for business users.  It was bundled with Coherent, a decent Unix V7 clone.  CP/M had been ported to Olivetti's Z8000 machine, so it wouldn't have taken much to port to the C900.
 
2022-06-28 2:29:47 PM  

Ivo Shandor: Dinjiin: I always thought it was a mistake that Commodore added the Z80 and CP/M ROM to the C128 as opposed to upgrading the CP/M cartridge that was available for the C64. It added a lot to the bill of materials price and generally derailed the C128 from being a real update to the C64.

Yeah, it was a weird machine. They were going for a dual-purpose home + business model where you could do your spreadsheets in CP/M with an 80-column text display, then flip over to 40-column color graphics to play games in the evening. And because the C-64 compatibility was so good, very few applications were developed for the native 128 mode.


One nice thing about the C-128 wass that you could write a program in BASIC that was too large to run natively on the C-64, use Blitz or some other BASIC to assembly translator to effectively compress it and have it then run well on a C-64. There was a popular BBS program that required that workflow if you wanted to add any features or customizations to it, but I think most people just ran it on a dedicated C-128.
 
2022-06-28 2:32:09 PM  

E.S.Q.: Nimbull: Get an old P1 or P2 system off eBay, install FreeDOS or MS DOS 6.2 on one of those removable SD card drive addons you can get for those. Spend the rest of your life living the good old days as the world around you falls in to a SaaS Windows 11 collective.

don't forget to insall a little speaker so you can hear the modem sounds


You can still get 8 bit sound cards new for PC's. There's that Blasterboard I think which is SB 2.0 compatible and can pop in to a regular 8 bit slot or 16 bit ISA slot. Since P1's and P2's can have ISA slots you could potentially get decent sound. There's even AdLib cards being made or available for projects last I heard.
 
2022-06-28 5:08:16 PM  
No joke within the last 10 years I worked at a customer site where part of their inventory system was still running in MS Dos.
 
2022-06-28 5:12:03 PM  
CP/M gets no love.
 
2022-06-28 6:31:25 PM  
Lots of cool text tools available under DOS. I remember how happy I was when grep and awk were ported to DOS and for about 5 years, DOS was a very nice program. DR, grep, awk, and file redirection and I cared not who made the laws.
 
2022-06-28 7:18:14 PM  
I was trying to get a USB controlled relay working the other day under Windows 10 to test it. Python (it was just testing it, I only had to document what I did not write fully supported code) didn't want to do anything useful, and all I needed to do was just send one or two bytes, and a couple of the commands had a byte or two returned...

After much faffing about, I checked the ascii table, went to the command window, and just entered "echo d >COM5" (and characters similar) - worked without issue. I then could figure out how to basically bit-bash through a USB serial port, and put up some basic code. Fortunately, all the commands were all keyboard available, so doing it effectively through dos was simple...

Some of our test computers still use DOS. One is still running 6.1 (?iirc), another I converted to Freedos, simply because the hardware is still function but a massive headache to replace....
 
2022-06-28 9:29:53 PM  

Ivo Shandor: Dinjiin: I always thought it was a mistake that Commodore added the Z80 and CP/M ROM to the C128 as opposed to upgrading the CP/M cartridge that was available for the C64. It added a lot to the bill of materials price and generally derailed the C128 from being a real update to the C64.

Yeah, it was a weird machine. They were going for a dual-purpose home + business model where you could do your spreadsheets in CP/M with an 80-column text display, then flip over to 40-column color graphics to play games in the evening. And because the C-64 compatibility was so good, very few applications were developed for the native 128 mode.


Very few. I picked up a 128 cheaply at one point. I liked it a lot. Nevertheless I don't think I ever used it in anything but C64 mode.
 
2022-06-28 9:39:06 PM  

Dinjiin: Psychopusher: Huh.  I didn't know about DOSBox-X.  I'mma have to play with that a ton later.  Looks like it does everything DOSBox does and a butt-ton more.

I like that it combines a ton of different DOSBox mods into one and that it is still under active development.  It is a noticeable improvement over the DOSBox-SVN version I had been previously using.


I like it as well. I've mainly appreciated it for its support of undocumented VGA modes, which is very useful for running DOS demos. This thread reminded me to look for updates. I've just installed the latest version. I see on the webpage it can now run Windows 98. I'll have to look into that a bit more. There are a few games I'd like to play that won't install or run on Windows 98 under VMWare. This might be the answer I've been looking for.
 
2022-06-28 9:53:44 PM  

Gordon Bennett: Ivo Shandor: Dinjiin: I always thought it was a mistake that Commodore added the Z80 and CP/M ROM to the C128 as opposed to upgrading the CP/M cartridge that was available for the C64. It added a lot to the bill of materials price and generally derailed the C128 from being a real update to the C64.

Yeah, it was a weird machine. They were going for a dual-purpose home + business model where you could do your spreadsheets in CP/M with an 80-column text display, then flip over to 40-column color graphics to play games in the evening. And because the C-64 compatibility was so good, very few applications were developed for the native 128 mode.

Very few. I picked up a 128 cheaply at one point. I liked it a lot. Nevertheless I don't think I ever used it in anything but C64 mode.


I used 128 mode for the BASIC programs I wrote. Games were on the 64 side.
 
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