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(Some Guy)   It's 1983 and you're working for Atari creating a Star Wars video arcade game. How do you hide yours and your colleagues' names in the game? Easy: just do it and to hell with the consequences. This "Easter Egg" is discovered 40 years later   (arcadeblogger.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Star Wars, Arcade game, Luke Skywalker, Atari, Star Wars arcade cabinet, Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, development of the game, Jed Margolin  
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1710 clicks; posted to Discussion » and Fandom » on 28 Jun 2022 at 7:15 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



28 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-06-28 6:33:35 AM  
Still play this as warm up on RetroArch even though it's crap without the heavy arcade yoke control. I loved that game so much when it hit our arcade.
 
2022-06-28 7:23:11 AM  

yohohogreengiant: Still play this as warm up on RetroArch even though it's crap without the heavy arcade yoke control. I loved that game so much when it hit our arcade.


Fark user imageView Full Size


If you have the space, Arcade1up are rumoured to be bringing this back out at some point. Well worth it, even just as a piece of art. And my kid loves it!
 
2022-06-28 7:44:50 AM  
The quarters I put into that game.
 
2022-06-28 7:59:54 AM  

Shagbert: yohohogreengiant: Still play this as warm up on RetroArch even though it's crap without the heavy arcade yoke control. I loved that game so much when it hit our arcade.

[Fark user image image 425x318]

If you have the space, Arcade1up are rumoured to be bringing this back out at some point. Well worth it, even just as a piece of art. And my kid loves it!


That's pretty damn awesome.

Nice. Kid standing on a bucket to reach out? Start them young on the arcade games.

Yeah, i don't have empty volume for that, sadly. I may consider just fastening the yoke to a plank and good to go .

But it warms my heart.
 
2022-06-28 8:34:41 AM  
The laundromat I went to on college had three arcade games, Star Wars, Indiana Jones Temple of Doom and Speed Buggy. I've always had a soft spot for vector graphics in arcade games.
 
2022-06-28 8:42:51 AM  
I remember someone pointing out "May The Force Be With You" back in the day.  I played that game enough to at least pick it up "subliminally".
 
2022-06-28 9:19:47 AM  

yohohogreengiant: Shagbert: yohohogreengiant: Still play this as warm up on RetroArch even though it's crap without the heavy arcade yoke control. I loved that game so much when it hit our arcade.

[Fark user image image 425x318]

If you have the space, Arcade1up are rumoured to be bringing this back out at some point. Well worth it, even just as a piece of art. And my kid loves it!

That's pretty damn awesome.

Nice. Kid standing on a bucket to reach out? Start them young on the arcade games.

Yeah, i don't have empty volume for that, sadly. I may consider just fastening the yoke to a plank and good to go .

But it warms my heart.


No the A1U cabs are sort of 3/4 sized so he was just standing and peering up at it. I think he was about 6 in that pic.

In other news, if you just want the yoke, this is by far the best one to get: https://thunderstickstudio.com/collections/new-arrivals/products/grs-flight-yoke

It's as sturdy as the arcade yoke was but built using better tech (no gears or teeth to strip).

There's also a ready made desk mount for it: https://www.buystuffarcades.com/products/grs-yoke-mount

Your wallet will hate me... :)
 
2022-06-28 9:26:47 AM  
I just played this at Funspot in Laconia, NH over the weekend, so I'm getting a kick...

If you are anywhere in the Northeast, you owe it to yourself to visit this place. I only wish it wasn't a 3-hour drive from my home.
 
2022-06-28 9:36:12 AM  

Shagbert: yohohogreengiant: Shagbert: yohohogreengiant: Still play this as warm up on RetroArch even though it's crap without the heavy arcade yoke control. I loved that game so much when it hit our arcade.

[Fark user image image 425x318]

If you have the space, Arcade1up are rumoured to be bringing this back out at some point. Well worth it, even just as a piece of art. And my kid loves it!

That's pretty damn awesome.

Nice. Kid standing on a bucket to reach out? Start them young on the arcade games.

Yeah, i don't have empty volume for that, sadly. I may consider just fastening the yoke to a plank and good to go .

But it warms my heart.

No the A1U cabs are sort of 3/4 sized so he was just standing and peering up at it. I think he was about 6 in that pic.

In other news, if you just want the yoke, this is by far the best one to get: https://thunderstickstudio.com/collections/new-arrivals/products/grs-flight-yoke

It's as sturdy as the arcade yoke was but built using better tech (no gears or teeth to strip).

There's also a ready made desk mount for it: https://www.buystuffarcades.com/products/grs-yoke-mount

Your wallet will hate me... :)


Mine too ... I assume this is awesome for the Star Wars Trilogy arcade game as well.
 
2022-06-28 9:54:04 AM  

JeffKochosky: I just played this at Funspot in Laconia, NH over the weekend, so I'm getting a kick...

If you are anywhere in the Northeast, you owe it to yourself to visit this place. I only wish it wasn't a 3-hour drive from my home.


Fun Spot is great!
 
2022-06-28 10:00:57 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-06-28 10:30:11 AM  

yohohogreengiant: Still play this as warm up on RetroArch even though it's crap without the heavy arcade yoke control. I loved that game so much when it hit our arcade.


Still one of my favorite games of all time. They had it at the Rochester Museum of Play last time I was there and it was still great! (Stand up version though, not the full sit-down version...)
 
2022-06-28 11:00:21 AM  

Shagbert: yohohogreengiant: Still play this as warm up on RetroArch even though it's crap without the heavy arcade yoke control. I loved that game so much when it hit our arcade.

[Fark user image 425x318]

If you have the space, Arcade1up are rumoured to be bringing this back out at some point. Well worth it, even just as a piece of art. And my kid loves it!


This is one I very much want.  It was released when I was in the process of moving between states and I had enough large items to deal with so I held hope it would still be available after I moved.  It was not.  But if they do re-release it, I will get it.

My friends have one and it plays right.
 
2022-06-28 11:00:22 AM  
FTA:
For many games after Star Wars it actually became fairly common practice for the programming teams to add their names to arcade video games. Some went as far as having a full credits screen - like at the end of the movies. Hard Drivin' for example lists everyone and everything but the kitchen sink!
But Star Wars holds the accolade as the first Atari game where this was successfully pulled off, ostensibly, right under the noses of the powers that be.


Um....no.

Warren Robinett put his name into Atari's "Adventure" game as an easter egg 3 years earlier in 1980. And Howard Scott Warshaw put his initials into "Yars Revenge" in 1982. This is hardly the "...first Atari game where it was successfully pulled off." Who writes this crap?
 
2022-06-28 11:11:45 AM  

Dick Gozinya: FTA:
For many games after Star Wars it actually became fairly common practice for the programming teams to add their names to arcade video games. Some went as far as having a full credits screen - like at the end of the movies. Hard Drivin' for example lists everyone and everything but the kitchen sink!
But Star Wars holds the accolade as the first Atari game where this was successfully pulled off, ostensibly, right under the noses of the powers that be.

Um....no.

Warren Robinett put his name into Atari's "Adventure" game as an easter egg 3 years earlier in 1980. And Howard Scott Warshaw put his initials into "Yars Revenge" in 1982. This is hardly the "...first Atari game where it was successfully pulled off." Who writes this crap?


I think they're speaking exclusively about Atari arcade cabinets, not 2600 VCS games.
 
2022-06-28 11:48:37 AM  

Dick Gozinya: FTA:
Um....no.

Warren Robinett put his name into Atari's "Adventure" game as an easter egg 3 years earlier in 1980. And Howard Scott Warshaw put his initials into "Yars Revenge" in 1982. This is hardly the "...first Atari game where it was successfully pulled off." Who writes this crap?


Cheer up Dick. This is referencing arcade games.
 
2022-06-28 12:21:56 PM  
Atari 2600 was my parent for a long time, lots of love here, so know how real this is for me to say:

All corporations are evil. Atari taught me this more than any other. And here is how:


'The company line was they didn't want other companies stealing their talent and people. "

And the in practice rality they really wanted:

The company line was they didn't want the other companies stealing their talent and people to have any market leverage or in fact even a compeditive labor market in the first place. So they made sure none of the work you did for them could give you any credit to command a better wage in the market.

Rich business owners want everyone to know what THEY made so they can be compeditive in the market. But they don't want anyone else to be known for what they made cause then they'd be a market of competitive wages in order to acquire their talents.
Anyone that ain't got the POV of "Stick it to the man" is fooking ignorant about their reality.But then today's kids are all "thank you Mr.Man sir, can i have dollar to shill your product sir?"
 
2022-06-28 12:28:07 PM  
This isn't a new discovery. It has been known in retro/classic gaming circles for decades.
 
2022-06-28 12:38:55 PM  

PvtStash: Atari 2600 was my parent for a long time, lots of love here, so know how real this is for me to say:

All corporations are evil. Atari taught me this more than any other. And here is how:


'The company line was they didn't want other companies stealing their talent and people. "

And the in practice rality they really wanted:

The company line was they didn't want the other companies stealing their talent and people to have any market leverage or in fact even a compeditive labor market in the first place. So they made sure none of the work you did for them could give you any credit to command a better wage in the market.

Rich business owners want everyone to know what THEY made so they can be compeditive in the market. But they don't want anyone else to be known for what they made cause then they'd be a market of competitive wages in order to acquire their talents.
Anyone that ain't got the POV of "Stick it to the man" is fooking ignorant about their reality.But then today's kids are all "thank you Mr.Man sir, can i have dollar to shill your product sir?"


Yeah. There's probably a debate to be had that's too complicated for my simple brain about the commercialisation of something creative, like a videogame.

i.e selling nuts and bolts and becoming a millionaire in the process is a pretty simple equation. Build something functional that people need for x, sell it for y.

Videogames is more subjective. Is it an art form vs nuts and bolts. Probably. And so in the early days of Atari certainly, the guys creating the games were doing it for the love and the "art" (videogame) that resulted. What Atari the corporate machine was good at, was monetising that game, by creating wonderful art and branding, putting a story and hype about the game and creating the market need for that thing. Creative people are less likely to kick up a stink about pay and conditions, and why would Atari question that?

And then you become something more than just a company with a P&L sheet (Atari, Apple, Google, Facebook) and now, all the best creative people want to work there, not for the money, but because you work on cool stuff.

So from the outside in, I think its easy to say "they should stick it to the man, man". but in reality any creative person will tell you not to take a role for the money (whereas the sales people are the opposite).

maybe.

Its a complicated subject, but I take your point.
 
2022-06-28 1:00:46 PM  

neilbradley: This isn't a new discovery. It has been known in retro/classic gaming circles for decades.


I'm surprised that they had  3 programmers (one presumably modding the hardware as well) and a designer.  A couple of years before it would have been one engineer, a technician, with possibly some help with the sound or other things.

It would be a few years more before you have the full credit list you see now.  Although not from Atari, they wanted to get their help (called "towel designers" by management) to feel replacable.  Activision got its start by poaching a crew called "the fantastic four" to make games for them.  Yes, both Activision and EA were a lot different in those days.  I think EA got bought out, and Activision figured that they could make a lot of money by simply abusing employees less (at least until Atari fell out of the market, then they could abuse them as much as they wanted).
 
2022-06-28 1:44:06 PM  
videotopia:
Yeah. There's probably a debate to be had that's too complicated for my simple brain about the commercialisation of something creative, like a videogame.

i.e selling nuts and bolts and becoming a millionaire in the process is a pretty simple equation. Build something functional that people need for x, sell it for y.

Videogames is more subjective. Is it an art form vs nuts and bolts. Probably. And so in the early days of Atari certainly, the guys creating the games were doing it for the love and the "art" (videogame) that resulted. What Atari the corporate machine was good at, was monetising that game, by creating wonderful art and branding, putting a story and hype about the game and creating the market need for that thing. Creative people are less likely to kick up a stink about pay and conditions, and why would Atari question that?

And then you become something more than just a company with a P&L ...



I find it really simpler than you think.

I mean we been selling 'entertainment" as plays, opera, tv, and movies a long long time now and none of that is any different than a video game. In that it demands a large group of differently specialized talents to produce the final work.


it's not all that extra complicated really.

the actual crux of the problem is simply a culture of individual greed.
The people who had the power, did not want to share in the wealth, and so used their power to engineer a situaiotn in which they did not have to.

That is all that happened, and that is all that ever happens no matter what for profit  market we are in.

How can i put more of this in my pocket?
that's the only question.


So it would sound as if the culture is, if they do not demand more then you can and should not give it them, and even better if you can make a situaotn in which they have little to no leverage to try and demand more, even better.


Like this:
the only thing a capitals hates more than a communist, is a competitor.
how can be it that they all take actions to try and not have competition in the first place, while speaking words to claim they welcome the competition?I do belvei the accepted wisdom is, "actions speak louder than words," so i figure anyone actually listening is  a chump falling for it.
 
2022-06-28 1:44:17 PM  

UberDave: I remember someone pointing out "May The Force Be With You" back in the day.  I played that game enough to at least pick it up "subliminally".


Same, but this is a very nice confirmation.
 
2022-06-28 2:23:40 PM  

yet_another_wumpus: neilbradley: This isn't a new discovery. It has been known in retro/classic gaming circles for decades.

I'm surprised that they had  3 programmers (one presumably modding the hardware as well) and a designer.  A couple of years before it would have been one engineer, a technician, with possibly some help with the sound or other things.

It would be a few years more before you have the full credit list you see now.  Although not from Atari, they wanted to get their help (called "towel designers" by management) to feel replacable.  Activision got its start by poaching a crew called "the fantastic four" to make games for them.  Yes, both Activision and EA were a lot different in those days.  I think EA got bought out, and Activision figured that they could make a lot of money by simply abusing employees less (at least until Atari fell out of the market, then they could abuse them as much as they wanted).


It's funny how Activision out the programmers front of box (David Crane did example) and was where devs were treated well. Things have changed
 
2022-06-28 7:48:27 PM  
Hiding stuff in gerbers is a long established tradition in the electronics industry.
 
2022-06-28 7:55:59 PM  
The Star Wars Atari game that is my default definition:

Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back for the Atari 2600
Youtube NcWGvwYWHgY
 
2022-06-28 9:10:32 PM  

yet_another_wumpus: neilbradley: This isn't a new discovery. It has been known in retro/classic gaming circles for decades.

I'm surprised that they had  3 programmers (one presumably modding the hardware as well) and a designer.  A couple of years before it would have been one engineer, a technician, with possibly some help with the sound or other things.

It would be a few years more before you have the full credit list you see now.  Although not from Atari, they wanted to get their help (called "towel designers" by management) to feel replacable.  Activision got its start by poaching a crew called "the fantastic four" to make games for them.  Yes, both Activision and EA were a lot different in those days.  I think EA got bought out, and Activision figured that they could make a lot of money by simply abusing employees less (at least until Atari fell out of the market, then they could abuse them as much as they wanted).


Activision didn't poach them. Activision were them. The four of them left Atari and founded Activision themselves.
 
2022-06-29 3:39:05 AM  
I can totally recommend Howard Scott Warshaw's memoir if you want a *lot* more background on why Atari didn't want people credited and the affect that had on the people working there.

https://newonceuponatari.hswarshaw.com

(Favourite story was the guy who got a voucher for a turkey as a bonus payment for his work on a massive seller, and straight up quit to make his own studio)
 
2022-06-29 12:19:51 PM  

Gordon Bennett: yet_another_wumpus: neilbradley: This isn't a new discovery. It has been known in retro/classic gaming circles for decades.
...
Activision didn't poach them. Activision were them. The four of them left Atari and founded Activision themselves.


Mostly true.  They were leaving and a guy named Jim Levy came along and provided the funding and ran the company for them (there was another "founder" as well, not sure if legal or accounting).  But they effectively wound up working for Levy under much better terms.

But there certainly wasn't an Activision until they started writing games.
 
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