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(Daily Dot)   Anonymous E-mail from work? It's not really anonymous   (dailydot.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Employment, Thought, TikToker Alex, anonymous survey, Daily Dot, half weeks, anonymous surveys, CT June  
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512 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 28 Jun 2022 at 10:05 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



26 Comments     (+0 »)
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2022-06-28 5:50:56 AM  
now answer the survey
 
2022-06-28 5:56:38 AM  
If you have a small department and only receive the essay portions of the survey results it's very easy to determine who wrote what based on writing style.

Which is why I never do anything more than check boxes, and inflate my ratings.
 
2022-06-28 8:07:57 AM  
Everyone knows those surveys aren't truly anonymous. In general, answer that you mostly like your job and coworkers, then, if you must, suggest some minor improvement you think would be nice. If you really hate your job, still do it this way - that way you continue to get paid while you look for a new job.
 
2022-06-28 8:11:15 AM  
They can't handle the truth. My company does a survey for everything but the only ones that really count are the how are we doing on a scale of 1 to 10 surveys. People used to be professional and honest and give real grades but all that did was get those we reported to in trouble. Now everything is a 9 or a 10. Working conditions have gotten better as management's generation has changed from silent to boomer and now Gen-X but there is still a shoot the messenger mentality.
 
2022-06-28 8:25:23 AM  
Our surveys are technically anonymous but are grouped by team for analysis purposes. Marking anything down yourself will drag down the group results but won't stand out in what gets given to the managers. Anything less than 80% positive is considered a failure and requires senior leadership to explain how they're going to address it. The 'return to office' plan was trashed so hard on the surveys the company revered direction and is OK with hybrid approaches. It didn't hurt that we expanded so much we don't have enough desks.
 
2022-06-28 9:00:55 AM  

BizarreMan: If you have a small department and only receive the essay portions of the survey results it's very easy to determine who wrote what based on writing style.

Which is why I never do anything more than check boxes, and inflate my ratings.


Depending on team size even the multiple choice style questions are easy to attribute to individuals.  When I worked on a team of 3 I refused to respond.  If you don't know how I feel about my job, the company, the team, the department, then you SUCK as a manager, and no amount of putting it on paper so HR can "discuss with us" is going to change that.
 
2022-06-28 10:17:14 AM  
Hell, I knew not to do that and I don't even have a nursing degree.
 
2022-06-28 10:21:37 AM  
Duh....
 
2022-06-28 10:35:31 AM  

BizarreMan: If you have a small department and only receive the essay portions of the survey results it's very easy to determine who wrote what based on writing style.

Which is why I never do anything more than check boxes, and inflate my ratings.


I work for a large corporation and at all levels the go on and on about how much they improved. My supervisor came out and told us he can figure out who said what. You better believe he gets good marks from me.

My wife's company had an anonymous survey. Those who didn't take it got emails reminding them to take the survey.
 
2022-06-28 10:36:40 AM  
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2022-06-28 10:38:48 AM  
"I got an email from my manager saying 'take this anonymous survey,'" Alex says in the clip. "I was super critical on that survey, but also very professional."

Apparently Alex is an idiot.
 
2022-06-28 10:39:44 AM  
With my current Contract, the client makes a big deal out of these engagement surveys (all Agile and whatnot). AFAIK, they don't try to deantomyze the data, but would never take that professional risk.
 
2022-06-28 11:06:53 AM  
We had such an anonymous survey where I worked, about 20 years ago. Turns out "anonymous" meant that they didn't link any name or position to the answers. What they did, though, was organize a lunch meeting for the whole (~50 people) company, where they showed a Powerpoint presentation listing all the answers. It was really easy to figure out who wrote some of them. Nothing too bad, honestly, but I'll never understand why they chose to read every single one of them, including the one complaining about "[department] manager's body odor", in front of everyone.

Yes, said manager was present.

Yes, it was as awkward as you'd think....
 
2022-06-28 11:17:07 AM  
at my last job, we'd get these kinds of surveys all the time. they were always looking for people to fire to save money, so these surveys were a great way to get that done because there was always someone who thought they were anonymous and corporate would actually take some kind of action.

I quietly warned people every time these surveys came around, even showing them how they track the URL's when you open the link, but some people thought they knew more.  one woman filled it out, taking exception to something our general manager did.  she was gone the next day

/that was an awful company that if it got wiped off the face of the earth today, the world would be a better place
 
2022-06-28 11:36:47 AM  
th.bing.comView Full Size


But... I was told it would be anonymous...
 
2022-06-28 11:47:12 AM  
I might believe the story.

Except it's on farking TikTok Attention Whore Central, so now I have to assume the absolute worst about the person making the video, instead of the workplace.
 
2022-06-28 11:59:20 AM  
Our company had one where we had to put our job title as one of the answers.  I was the only 'gramma' in the company.
Still, HR assured me that the results were anonymous.
 
2022-06-28 12:34:10 PM  
If you worry about anonymous, you need to get a better job.  I leave constructive feedback and sometimes even include a note that I know the survey isn't anonymous and that they should feel free to contact me directly if they have additional/clarifying questions.

/the first time was funny when the HR guy had to admin the survey wasn't anonymous
 
2022-06-28 12:47:33 PM  
I'm in charge of a survey we do of the entire campus every 3 years.  Even though it's run by an outside agency I could easily de-anonymize the data based on demographic data and sometimes just the comment wording

I won't do it through- nobody sees the data files but me and even though in a few cases I could help a specific person with a problem I won't do it because it would make it obvious it wasn't truly anonymous

And I don't know about other groups but we absolutely do use the data to set priorities
 
2022-06-28 1:50:07 PM  

Another Government Employee: With my current Contract, the client makes a big deal out of these engagement surveys (all Agile and whatnot). AFAIK, they don't try to deantomyze the data, but would never take that professional risk.


Whenever I hear the term "Agile" in a business setting I want to punch somebody in the balls (not you tho)
 
2022-06-28 2:38:24 PM  
We had a survey several years back when we had a project manager that was being groomed for a  project in an entirely different technology and when it was cancelled he was dumped on us. So he was a fish out of water. To make things worst his deputy was a full time bean counter and personnel schemer that everyone hated so there was nobody technical in the front office of an organization full of engineers. Both managers got torched on the surveys the year the project was cancelled and the Project Manager guy wanted names so he could fire people. He was denied. In the end both retired soon afterwards and were never heard from again, in an industry where retirees love to come back as consultants part time.
 
2022-06-28 5:24:14 PM  
Did it really say "anonymous" or just "confidential" ?
 
2022-06-28 5:40:05 PM  
My previous employer did this. I worked in IT, so I knew it. I warned people that it wasn't *really* anonymous.

What was funny was, there was a guy that I was friends with, who was in lower-level management, and he didn't believe me. He thought that the company would never be that shifty/sneaky. Then one day, during a smoke break, he came up to me, looking very distressed, and said he was told to schedule meetings with all of the employees in his department that had given "negative" answers on the survey. He said that all the names and stuff were just...right there, as part of the "anonymous" survey system. He said it even auto-generated a report showing the people that gave "too many" negative answers.

He was pretty shaken-up. He was a good guy. He was very much a "Yay Our Company!" guy, and thought upper-management had our best interests at heart.

Over the course of the next year, he moved out of that department, and then not long after that left the company. During that whole time, he just got more-and-more disillusioned, as he started to look deeper into how things were actually done, and how management consistently lied to the employees. It was interesting to see. He was a Republican, and he even started to question the propaganda they were feeding him. It was like...his whole "Rich white men are great!" fantasy world got shattered, when he finally got to see behind the curtain.
 
2022-06-28 6:21:34 PM  

realmolo: My previous employer did this. I worked in IT, so I knew it. I warned people that it wasn't *really* anonymous.

What was funny was, there was a guy that I was friends with, who was in lower-level management, and he didn't believe me. He thought that the company would never be that shifty/sneaky. Then one day, during a smoke break, he came up to me, looking very distressed, and said he was told to schedule meetings with all of the employees in his department that had given "negative" answers on the survey. He said that all the names and stuff were just...right there, as part of the "anonymous" survey system. He said it even auto-generated a report showing the people that gave "too many" negative answers.

He was pretty shaken-up. He was a good guy. He was very much a "Yay Our Company!" guy, and thought upper-management had our best interests at heart.

Over the course of the next year, he moved out of that department, and then not long after that left the company. During that whole time, he just got more-and-more disillusioned, as he started to look deeper into how things were actually done, and how management consistently lied to the employees. It was interesting to see. He was a Republican, and he even started to question the propaganda they were feeding him. It was like...his whole "Rich white men are great!" fantasy world got shattered, when he finally got to see behind the curtain.


I'm in IT too.  My employer hired at outside firm to do the surveys one year. They told us that they would only get summary data back and not anything that could be traced back to a person. The HR person was terrible at Excel so she had me fix a file for her. The file of everyone's answers. With names.  
There might be a company somewhere that has anonymous surveys, but I haven't found one yet.
 
2022-06-29 10:21:39 AM  

The Weekend Baker: "I got an email from my manager saying 'take this anonymous survey,'" Alex says in the clip. "I was super critical on that survey, but also very professional."

Apparently Alex is an idiot.


And self-involved.
 
2022-06-29 7:02:59 PM  
our HR department is playing anonmyous survey games, but we're IT, so when you break out the numbers of a small team by gender, you pretty much identified everybody in the group.
 
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