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(Phys Org2)   This fungi is having sex. Why you should care   (phys.org) divider line
    More: PSA, Bacteria, Asexual reproduction, Reproduction, Organism, HIV, Sexual intercourse, results of that study, Human sexual behavior  
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672 clicks; posted to STEM » on 27 Jun 2022 at 3:49 PM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



13 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-06-27 3:57:06 PM  
A fun guy having sex? it's not news, it's fark
 
2022-06-27 4:00:00 PM  
"You are currently using an ad blocker. What are the consequences"

live.staticflickr.comView Full Size
 
2022-06-27 4:12:01 PM  
Maybe they should stop playing Barry White in the lab to keep the fungi from fungi'n around.
 
2022-06-27 4:12:22 PM  
 
2022-06-27 4:21:34 PM  

Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: "You are currently using an ad blocker. What are the consequences"

[live.staticflickr.com image 221x240]


Jesus. You're overworried about your digital contraception.

Researchers find deadly fungus can multiply by having sex, which could produce more drug-resistant, virulent strains
by McMaster University
Fark user imageView Full Size

Candida albicans, which is related to Candida auris. Credit: CDC
Researchers at McMaster University have unlocked an evolutionary mystery of a deadly pathogen responsible for fueling the superbug crisis: it can reproduce by having sex.
And while such fraternizing is infrequent, scientists report it could be producing more drug-resistant and more virulent strains of Candida auris, capable of spreading faster.
C. auris is a fungus that can cause severe infections and sometimes death, often striking immunocompromised hospital patients.
Unlike animals and plants, microorganisms of this nature usually divide and reproduce asexually, so one produces two, two produce four and so on, all genetically identical to each other, through a process of very simple division and without the exchange of genetic material.
"One of the really complex and puzzling questions about this fungal pathogen is its origin and how it reproduces in nature," says Jianping Xu, a professor in McMaster's Department of Biology and researcher with Canada's Global Nexus for Pandemics and Biological Threats.
For the study, recently published online in Computation and Structural Biotechnology Journal, researchers analyzed nearly 1,300 strains available on a public database of C. auris genome sequences. They searched for and confirmed recombination events, or sexual activity.
The findings will help to inform further research because scientists can now replicate those sexual behaviors in the lab.
"The research tells us that this fungus has recombined in the past and can recombine in nature , which enable it to generate new genetic variants rather quickly," explains Xu. "That may sound frightening, but it's a double-edged sword. Because we learned they could recombine in nature, we could possibly replicate the process in the lab, which could allow us to understand the genetic controls of virulence and drug resistance and potentially other traits that make it such a dangerous pathogen, much faster."
C. auris was first discovered in 2009 and has since spread in over 50 countries, where outbreaks have been reported and thousands have died from fungal infections.
In Canada, three of the five known divergent lineages of C. auris have been identified, some isolated from the same hospital.
Xu explains that if one strain becomes resistant to one drug and another strain becomes resistant to another drug, then through sexual activity they could produce offspring resistant to both drugs.
"The mixing of strains in the same hospital, potentially in the same patient, creates an opportunity for them to meet and mate," he says. "This study is about sex and the implication of sex to organisms is often very broad. For fungi, it means they can spread genes that are beneficial to them much faster through populations than asexual reproduction alone."
In previous work, Xu and his collaborators at the University of Delhi had found drug-resistant strains of C. auris on the skins of two popular varieties of stored apples, Royal Gala and Red Delicious, which had been treated with fungicides to extend shelf life. The results of that study suggested the apples could be a pathway for the yeast, helping it to spread drug-resistant strains more widely.
 
2022-06-27 5:01:53 PM  
This isn't news. Fungi reproduce sexually all the time. Many, if not most, reproduce both sexually and asexually, and their sexual reproduction is more complicated than with plants and animals. I tried to read up on it a bit before posting but my attention span is too short at the moment.
 
2022-06-27 5:02:27 PM  
I'm gonna guess this is about fun guys rubbing their mushroom caps together and not click
 
2022-06-27 5:15:31 PM  

CordycepsInYourBrain: This isn't news. Fungi reproduce sexually all the time. Many, if not most, reproduce both sexually and asexually, and their sexual reproduction is more complicated than with plants and animals. I tried to read up on it a bit before posting but my attention span is too short at the moment.


User name checks out.
 
2022-06-27 5:25:52 PM  

Tax Boy: A fun guy having sex? it's not news, it's fark


Yeah, sometimes resulting in a fun gal infection.
 
2022-06-27 5:42:52 PM  

chitownmike: I'm gonna guess this is about fun guys rubbing their mushroom caps together and not click


Don't spore-shame.
 
2022-06-27 5:44:51 PM  
One, if not THE reason that sexual reproduction dominates in evolution to the point the exceptions are extremely remarkable is that it provides a lot of opportunity for advantageous traits to spread through a population instead of having to have the entire population replaced by the progeny of a single successful mutation.

Then again, bacteria can skip that and just transfer genes back and forth whenever the hell they like.
 
2022-06-27 8:31:16 PM  
Fungi having sex?

Obviously it's not married.
 
2022-06-28 5:08:17 AM  

Nimbull: Maybe they should stop playing Barry White in the lab to keep the fungi from fungi'n around.


More like Tony Orlando and Dawn

Tony Orlando "Candida"
Youtube WROdwlk9_h8
 
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