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(History Channel)   On this day in history, in 1985, the number of kicks one could get on Route 66 went to zero   (history.com) divider line
    More: Vintage, Interstate Highway System, U.S. Route 66, Freeway, Autobahn, highway signs, iconic Route, John Steinbeck, Texas  
•       •       •

4249 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Jun 2022 at 10:50 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-06-27 10:54:07 AM  
John Lydon - Route 66
Youtube WQDGqnrgAZM
 
2022-06-27 10:54:35 AM  
The missus and I are planning a Route 66 (historic) drive next year in her Mustang GT convertible.  Looking forward to the road trip.
 
2022-06-27 11:00:59 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size

Still posted across the country
 
2022-06-27 11:02:10 AM  
But you can do just fine on Route 69. . .
 
2022-06-27 11:03:21 AM  

Boojum2k: But you can do just fine on Route 69. . .


Started off going lickety-split, but then right away blew a rod.
 
2022-06-27 11:05:39 AM  
Route 66 connected Chicago and Springfield, IL back in the day;  we had a mandatory trip to Sprfld in Jr. High.  MOST of the route we took was I-55, but at that time there were a few detours off the uncompleted interstate and onto the ancient Rte 66.  Some of those segments are still extant, marked as chitownmike pointed out above.  At least one segment is used as an onramp for I-55.
 
2022-06-27 11:06:48 AM  

EasilyDistracted: The missus and I are planning a Route 66 (historic) drive next year in her Mustang GT convertible.  Looking forward to the road trip.


Be sure to visit the Blue Whale that is outside of Catoosa, Oklahoma.
 
2022-06-27 11:07:47 AM  
I had no idea.  Thought it was still a thing.

I guess we still have

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-06-27 11:07:57 AM  

EasilyDistracted: The missus and I are planning a Route 66 (historic) drive next year in her Mustang GT convertible.  Looking forward to the road trip.


Pack a few extra spare tires
 
2022-06-27 11:08:59 AM  
Blueberry Hill still thrilling?
 
2022-06-27 11:09:53 AM  

whidbey: I had no idea.  Thought it was still a thing.

I guess we still have

[Fark user image image 275x183]


Nope, they changed that to US-491 due to sign theft.
 
2022-06-27 11:11:19 AM  

buserror: whidbey: I had no idea.  Thought it was still a thing.

I guess we still have

[Fark user image image 275x183]

Nope, they changed that to US-491 due to sign theft.


Good thing it wasn't 420 then.

I wonder what's 491?  Sign theft, duh.
 
2022-06-27 11:13:37 AM  
My daily commute prior to going fully remote was up and down the same 4-mile stretch of old Route 66 on this retro beauty. I get my kicks however I'd like, subby. 

lh3.googleusercontent.comView Full Size
 
2022-06-27 11:15:52 AM  
A better time, a worse time.
 
2022-06-27 11:19:45 AM  

chitownmike: [Fark user image 136x200]
Still posted across the country


Yup.  4 different routes through my city, bannered by years active.  Even appears on the finger signs as any other route number on the signs that have been replaced since putting the route shield on the finger signs became typical here.
 
2022-06-27 11:20:39 AM  

whidbey: I had no idea.  Thought it was still a thing.

I guess we still have

[Fark user image 275x183]


Nope, it got renumbered US 550 to reflect its current parent route and get people to stop stealing the signs.
 
2022-06-27 11:24:01 AM  

blasterz: My daily commute prior to going fully remote was up and down the same 4-mile stretch of old Route 66 on this retro beauty. I get my kicks however I'd like, subby. 

[lh3.googleusercontent.com image 850x637]


Fun fact: Arizona DOT currently owns the Burma-Shave trademark, they got it mostly so on US Historic 66 they could put up signs in the style of the old ads, which themselves aren't entirely authentic (since the current ones meet all the usual placement and reflectivity standards as other highway signs, presumably because you work with what you got) and because the previous owner was being a dick to the historical society that was maintaining and restoring their old abandoned ad signs.

I think these are the only red signs posted by a state DOT on a highway that don't indicate potential mortal danger.
 
2022-06-27 11:29:05 AM  

Baloo Uriza: blasterz: My daily commute prior to going fully remote was up and down the same 4-mile stretch of old Route 66 on this retro beauty. I get my kicks however I'd like, subby. 

[lh3.googleusercontent.com image 850x637]

Fun fact: Arizona DOT currently owns the Burma-Shave trademark, they got it mostly so on US Historic 66 they could put up signs in the style of the old ads, which themselves aren't entirely authentic (since the current ones meet all the usual placement and reflectivity standards as other highway signs, presumably because you work with what you got) and because the previous owner was being a dick to the historical society that was maintaining and restoring their old abandoned ad signs.

I think these are the only red signs posted by a state DOT on a highway that don't indicate potential mortal danger.


Yeah, I don't think the local society here in the Illinois flatlands cares much if they even bothered looking into who owns the trademark. The signs are non-reflective and the old Route acts as a service road for Interstate 55 so the signs aren't really visible from any federal highway.
 
2022-06-27 11:38:11 AM  
I was actually born on Route 66. The ambulance did not make it to Mennonite Hospital on Main St (Route 66) in Bloomington, IL. I was born in the parking lot of the IGA Market in Normal, IL about a mile away. My Uncle (Mother's brother) was on the Bloomington Fire Dept and part of the "Rescue Squad" as it was called. He delivered me. It was a big article in the Bloomington Daily Pantagraph (real paper, still in print). I came early, the snowy roads hadn't been cleared enough and the 1955 Pontiac Ambulance (only 1 year old at the time) had trouble getting through the snow. Main St/Route 66 were better cleared than the roads leading to Brokaw Hospital in Normal, so the decision was to take Mother to Mennonite Hospital even though Brokaw was closer, but on uncleared, hilly roads the Rescue Squad didn't think they would be able to navigate.

The dividing line between Bloomington and Normal was Division St. Projecting the dividing line into the IGA parking lot found the ambulance had parked, for my delivery, so the front of the vehicle was half in Bloomington and the rear half was in Normal. Since Mother was on a gurney in the rear half, my birth certificate records me born in Normal but the birth itself was recorded in Bloomington.

I long ago adopted the attitude that at least it says "Normal" somewhere on my birth certificate.

Route 66 was an important part of my early childhood and that of my Family. I made a few trips along the length of it to California as a kid in Summers. Shortly before WW2 Mother and her first husband drove it to reach their Honeymoon destination: Santa Catalina Island, off Los Angeles. We drove north to Chicago many times for shopping and to visit Family in Chicagoland, visit Riverside Park and the Loop and the Museums. In the 1970s and after, when I was a Sailor stationed in California, I made a few driving trips along the length of it since I just liked driving. Route 66 was an important and special part of my life.

An Aunt and her husband had a diner in Chenoa, IL on Route 66. Father's family had a hotel and farms in Livingston, IL just off Route 66. (One farm was called Chicago Road Farm.) We also travelled by train (Chicago & Alton, the Ann Southern and the Abraham Lincoln) to Chicago, often paralleling Route 66. Good memories of a good road.

One topic of travelling conversation was how to keep cool in the pre-air-conditioning days of auto travel when crossing AZ, NM, TX in Summer. A common thing was to fill coolers with ice in the mornings. Not great but the best available remedy in those days. Then, about 10 days later, the return trip.
 
2022-06-27 11:38:27 AM  
I prefer Highway 61.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-06-27 11:40:47 AM  

EasilyDistracted: The missus and I are planning a Route 66 (historic) drive next year in her Mustang GT convertible.  Looking forward to the road trip.


I tried to drive part of it (the original 'old' Route 66) during a road trip out west in 2018. Couldn't make it more than 1/4 mile before I thought the car was going to disintegrate. Worse than cobblestone. The asphalt is in such bad shape from baking in the sun, I had to turn around and get right back on the new highway. Plan accordingly. I think we tried in Arizona or New Mexico.
 
2022-06-27 11:44:38 AM  
And the Round Barn and Pop's in Arcadia are also worth a look. I drive 15 miles on Route 66 every day to and from work. On a nice weekend, it is thick with Harleys.
 
2022-06-27 11:53:40 AM  

EasilyDistracted: The missus and I are planning a Route 66 (historic) drive next year in her Mustang GT convertible.  Looking forward to the road trip.


Be sure to go standin' on a corner in Winslow, Arizona.

Be sure to NOT rest your hand on the bronze statue there.  You know, a 6 foot tall piece of metal that's been baking in the sun in the desert.

You can see from the shiny spots on the shoulders that show I'm not the only one dumb enough to do that.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-06-27 11:57:02 AM  

blasterz: Baloo Uriza: blasterz: My daily commute prior to going fully remote was up and down the same 4-mile stretch of old Route 66 on this retro beauty. I get my kicks however I'd like, subby. 

[lh3.googleusercontent.com image 850x637]

Fun fact: Arizona DOT currently owns the Burma-Shave trademark, they got it mostly so on US Historic 66 they could put up signs in the style of the old ads, which themselves aren't entirely authentic (since the current ones meet all the usual placement and reflectivity standards as other highway signs, presumably because you work with what you got) and because the previous owner was being a dick to the historical society that was maintaining and restoring their old abandoned ad signs.

I think these are the only red signs posted by a state DOT on a highway that don't indicate potential mortal danger.

Yeah, I don't think the local society here in the Illinois flatlands cares much if they even bothered looking into who owns the trademark. The signs are non-reflective and the old Route acts as a service road for Interstate 55 so the signs aren't really visible from any federal highway.


Well, the good news is ADOT both has no intentions of suing people for using the trademark (at least for that kind of purpose) and has no intentions of letting it go.
 
2022-06-27 12:00:21 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size

"Tod Stiles, a recent college graduate with no future prospects due to circumstances beyond his control." After some time he tired of aimlessly wandering the southwest and settled in L.A.
He took charge of his life and sold the Corvette and become a police officer.
His traveling companion, Buz Murdock, found his way to Hollywood and after kicking around for a few years eventually appeared fully nude in Playgirl magazine.
 
2022-06-27 12:04:50 PM  

RobotSpider: EasilyDistracted: The missus and I are planning a Route 66 (historic) drive next year in her Mustang GT convertible.  Looking forward to the road trip.

I tried to drive part of it (the original 'old' Route 66) during a road trip out west in 2018. Couldn't make it more than 1/4 mile before I thought the car was going to disintegrate. Worse than cobblestone. The asphalt is in such bad shape from baking in the sun, I had to turn around and get right back on the new highway. Plan accordingly. I think we tried in Arizona or New Mexico.


Sounds like New Mexico.  One especially bad section goes through Pueblo Laguna; the pueblo renumbered it as L-66 and removed the pavement because they don't want the traffic or the tourism.  This is also the longest stretch I can think of where photography is prohibited by law, so it's very much a 'take only experiences, leave only tire tracks" kind of place.  You don't want to let the local cops see you with your camera out or with a dashcam.  In some of the flatter parts of the desert it's honestly hard to tell where the road even is because it seamlessly meets the open desert.

This section was the biggest surprise to me when I drove it about 10 years ago because I remembered it not long after US 66 became a historic route in the 1980s on a family road trip as a kid, and it was still the main road that wasn't I 40 then.
 
2022-06-27 12:08:24 PM  
I watched the first episode of Route 66 when I saw it was on a streaming site. For the nostalgia. Did not bother to watch any others. Let it rest in peace.
 
2022-06-27 12:14:32 PM  

BunchaRubes: EasilyDistracted: The missus and I are planning a Route 66 (historic) drive next year in her Mustang GT convertible.  Looking forward to the road trip.

Be sure to go standin' on a corner in Winslow, Arizona.

Be sure to NOT rest your hand on the bronze statue there.  You know, a 6 foot tall piece of metal that's been baking in the sun in the desert.

You can see from the shiny spots on the shoulders that show I'm not the only one dumb enough to do that.

[Fark user image 538x519]


In one of the parks here, we have a statue of a Great Dane with his paw up. His paw is always gold.
 
2022-06-27 12:18:33 PM  

Lurk Who's Talking: ...Shortly before WW2 Mother and her first husband drove it to reach their Honeymoon destination: Santa Catalina Island, off Los Angeles...


You're kidding.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-06-27 12:18:40 PM  

Baloo Uriza: RobotSpider: EasilyDistracted: The missus and I are planning a Route 66 (historic) drive next year in her Mustang GT convertible.  Looking forward to the road trip.

I tried to drive part of it (the original 'old' Route 66) during a road trip out west in 2018. Couldn't make it more than 1/4 mile before I thought the car was going to disintegrate. Worse than cobblestone. The asphalt is in such bad shape from baking in the sun, I had to turn around and get right back on the new highway. Plan accordingly. I think we tried in Arizona or New Mexico.

Sounds like New Mexico.  One especially bad section goes through Pueblo Laguna; the pueblo renumbered it as L-66 and removed the pavement because they don't want the traffic or the tourism.  This is also the longest stretch I can think of where photography is prohibited by law, so it's very much a 'take only experiences, leave only tire tracks" kind of place.  You don't want to let the local cops see you with your camera out or with a dashcam.  In some of the flatter parts of the desert it's honestly hard to tell where the road even is because it seamlessly meets the open desert.

This section was the biggest surprise to me when I drove it about 10 years ago because I remembered it not long after US 66 became a historic route in the 1980s on a family road trip as a kid, and it was still the main road that wasn't I 40 then.


Do you know the reason for the intense privacy?
 
2022-06-27 12:19:58 PM  

blasterz: My daily commute prior to going fully remote was up and down the same 4-mile stretch of old Route 66 on this retro beauty. I get my kicks however I'd like, subby. 

[lh3.googleusercontent.com image 850x637]


That bike is beautiful! 🏍
 
2022-06-27 12:21:38 PM  

FarkingChas: I watched the first episode of Route 66 when I saw it was on a streaming site. For the nostalgia. Did not bother to watch any others. Let it rest in peace.


Fark user imageView Full Size


You have to watch the Robert Duvall heroin episode "Birdcage on my Foot".
 
2022-06-27 12:23:36 PM  
It's on my bucket list to drive Route 66.  But I'm in Pennsylvania, so I'd have to drive a wee bit just to get to it.

I'd take the Interstates back, though.
 
2022-06-27 12:25:46 PM  
My grandfather was an Oklahoma dirt farmer who probably owed most of his livelihood to the fact that truckers used Route 66 to ship grain and other agricultural products from there to California and Chicago.  So yeah, it was a lifeline in its day.
 
2022-06-27 12:32:55 PM  

chitownmike: [Fark user image 136x200]
Still

RE-posted across the country

FTFY...

That was done later, after they realized just how popular everything was. The true highway is gone, a few stretches remain, but if it had been a normal highway, it definitely would have been left to the dustbin of history. But 66 was different, so they went back out and added the markers. Except for these off and on stretches, the only other place the road still exists is wherever it was the road through Main Street. Flagstaff, Seligman, Williams, Winslow, Ash Fork.
 
2022-06-27 12:36:27 PM  

RobotSpider: EasilyDistracted: The missus and I are planning a Route 66 (historic) drive next year in her Mustang GT convertible.  Looking forward to the road trip.

I tried to drive part of it (the original 'old' Route 66) during a road trip out west in 2018. Couldn't make it more than 1/4 mile before I thought the car was going to disintegrate. Worse than cobblestone. The asphalt is in such bad shape from baking in the sun, I had to turn around and get right back on the new highway. Plan accordingly. I think we tried in Arizona or New Mexico.


I've driven all over 66 in Arizona, and the parts that are meant to be driven on are just fine. Were you on the old roadbed?
 
2022-06-27 12:39:02 PM  

atomic-age: Baloo Uriza: RobotSpider: EasilyDistracted: The missus and I are planning a Route 66 (historic) drive next year in her Mustang GT convertible.  Looking forward to the road trip.

I tried to drive part of it (the original 'old' Route 66) during a road trip out west in 2018. Couldn't make it more than 1/4 mile before I thought the car was going to disintegrate. Worse than cobblestone. The asphalt is in such bad shape from baking in the sun, I had to turn around and get right back on the new highway. Plan accordingly. I think we tried in Arizona or New Mexico.

Sounds like New Mexico.  One especially bad section goes through Pueblo Laguna; the pueblo renumbered it as L-66 and removed the pavement because they don't want the traffic or the tourism.  This is also the longest stretch I can think of where photography is prohibited by law, so it's very much a 'take only experiences, leave only tire tracks" kind of place.  You don't want to let the local cops see you with your camera out or with a dashcam.  In some of the flatter parts of the desert it's honestly hard to tell where the road even is because it seamlessly meets the open desert.

This section was the biggest surprise to me when I drove it about 10 years ago because I remembered it not long after US 66 became a historic route in the 1980s on a family road trip as a kid, and it was still the main road that wasn't I 40 then.

Do you know the reason for the intense privacy?


They're just a small, peaceful nation in the middle of the desert not really wanting to get engaged or be engaged a whole hell of a lot.   Photography is culturally offensive on a spiritual level and the pueblo's been vibing away not really caring about anything more than a few hours away for several centuries.  Nobody asked them if they wanted Route 66, much less driving it right down the main street of their settlements.  They quite understandably felt like they were being treated like just another roadside attraction to be gawked at and resented that quite a lot.  And I don't really blame them, living on Route 66 like I have most of the last decade's like living in a fishbowl even now.

For folks who want to check out the Pueblo Laguna and its environs, I recommend you don't out of respect, but if you do, either pass through inconspicuously without stopping or do some research online to see if there's presently a visitors center or equivalent inviting people in.  And probably couldn't hurt to have a copy of that information on you in case you get stopped, almost all the side roads along L-66 are posted local or destination access only, so it's not legal to leave L-66 without being a local or having a reason to do so.
 
2022-06-27 12:40:39 PM  

atomic-age: Baloo Uriza: RobotSpider: EasilyDistracted: The missus and I are planning a Route 66 (historic) drive next year in her Mustang GT convertible.  Looking forward to the road trip.

I tried to drive part of it (the original 'old' Route 66) during a road trip out west in 2018. Couldn't make it more than 1/4 mile before I thought the car was going to disintegrate. Worse than cobblestone. The asphalt is in such bad shape from baking in the sun, I had to turn around and get right back on the new highway. Plan accordingly. I think we tried in Arizona or New Mexico.

Sounds like New Mexico.  One especially bad section goes through Pueblo Laguna; the pueblo renumbered it as L-66 and removed the pavement because they don't want the traffic or the tourism.  This is also the longest stretch I can think of where photography is prohibited by law, so it's very much a 'take only experiences, leave only tire tracks" kind of place.  You don't want to let the local cops see you with your camera out or with a dashcam.  In some of the flatter parts of the desert it's honestly hard to tell where the road even is because it seamlessly meets the open desert.

This section was the biggest surprise to me when I drove it about 10 years ago because I remembered it not long after US 66 became a historic route in the 1980s on a family road trip as a kid, and it was still the main road that wasn't I 40 then.

Do you know the reason for the intense privacy?


Pueblos are New Mexico's way of dressing up reservations, because as we all know, slapping a new name on things always fixes the issue.

Anyway, I'm guessing that this is some power trip on behalf of the tribe. If they can deny people the ability to do something as simple as take photos, then they've "won".
 
2022-06-27 12:44:35 PM  
Back in the 1990s I was down in Smokey Mountain National Forest doing some camping and I ran into a couple of guys who said they were on road trip driving Route 66 from the East Coast to the West Coast. I think drugs might have been the co-pilot on their road trip.
 
2022-06-27 12:48:07 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-06-27 12:49:18 PM  

Mikey1969: Pueblos are New Mexico's way of dressing up reservations, because as we all know, slapping a new name on things always fixes the issue.


Not always.  Navajo isn't a pueblo.  And neither New Mexico nor the US has a choice in what they want to call themselves.

Mikey1969: Anyway, I'm guessing that this is some power trip on behalf of the tribe. If they can deny people the ability to do something as simple as take photos, then they've "won".


I'm unaware of any point in my life, even when US 66 existed, where photography was legal in the Pueblo Laguna territory.
 
2022-06-27 12:49:57 PM  
I get my kicks above the waistline, sunshine.
 
2022-06-27 12:50:41 PM  
They don't mention the Depeche Mode version of the song which is the first one I think of.
 
2022-06-27 12:55:30 PM  

atomic-age: Baloo Uriza: RobotSpider: EasilyDistracted: The missus and I are planning a Route 66 (historic) drive next year in her Mustang GT convertible.  Looking forward to the road trip.

I tried to drive part of it (the original 'old' Route 66) during a road trip out west in 2018. Couldn't make it more than 1/4 mile before I thought the car was going to disintegrate. Worse than cobblestone. The asphalt is in such bad shape from baking in the sun, I had to turn around and get right back on the new highway. Plan accordingly. I think we tried in Arizona or New Mexico.

Sounds like New Mexico.  One especially bad section goes through Pueblo Laguna; the pueblo renumbered it as L-66 and removed the pavement because they don't want the traffic or the tourism.  This is also the longest stretch I can think of where photography is prohibited by law, so it's very much a 'take only experiences, leave only tire tracks" kind of place.  You don't want to let the local cops see you with your camera out or with a dashcam.  In some of the flatter parts of the desert it's honestly hard to tell where the road even is because it seamlessly meets the open desert.

This section was the biggest surprise to me when I drove it about 10 years ago because I remembered it not long after US 66 became a historic route in the 1980s on a family road trip as a kid, and it was still the main road that wasn't I 40 then.

Do you know the reason for the intense privacy?


More like inten$e permit$.
 
2022-06-27 12:57:30 PM  

BunchaRubes: atomic-age: Baloo Uriza: RobotSpider: EasilyDistracted: The missus and I are planning a Route 66 (historic) drive next year in her Mustang GT convertible.  Looking forward to the road trip.

I tried to drive part of it (the original 'old' Route 66) during a road trip out west in 2018. Couldn't make it more than 1/4 mile before I thought the car was going to disintegrate. Worse than cobblestone. The asphalt is in such bad shape from baking in the sun, I had to turn around and get right back on the new highway. Plan accordingly. I think we tried in Arizona or New Mexico.

Sounds like New Mexico.  One especially bad section goes through Pueblo Laguna; the pueblo renumbered it as L-66 and removed the pavement because they don't want the traffic or the tourism.  This is also the longest stretch I can think of where photography is prohibited by law, so it's very much a 'take only experiences, leave only tire tracks" kind of place.  You don't want to let the local cops see you with your camera out or with a dashcam.  In some of the flatter parts of the desert it's honestly hard to tell where the road even is because it seamlessly meets the open desert.

This section was the biggest surprise to me when I drove it about 10 years ago because I remembered it not long after US 66 became a historic route in the 1980s on a family road trip as a kid, and it was still the main road that wasn't I 40 then.

Do you know the reason for the intense privacy?

More like inten$e permit$.


They don't seem to be interested in that, either.  I'm surprised it's hard for people to understand some folks just want to be left alone.
 
2022-06-27 1:25:00 PM  

whidbey: buserror: whidbey: I had no idea.  Thought it was still a thing.

I guess we still have

[Fark user image image 275x183]

Nope, they changed that to US-491 due to sign theft.

Good thing it wasn't 420 then.

I wonder what's 491?  Sign theft, duh.


Don't worry, Virginia has you covered.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-06-27 1:47:02 PM  
Baloo Uriza:

I'm unaware of any point in my life, even when US 66 existed, where photography was legal in the Pueblo Laguna territory.

Exactly, because they are on a power trip, just as I said. There's no reason for this, a camera doesn't "steal your soul". They just found something where they can sit and exercise power over others.
 
2022-06-27 1:48:22 PM  

BunchaRubes: EasilyDistracted: The missus and I are planning a Route 66 (historic) drive next year in her Mustang GT convertible.  Looking forward to the road trip.

Be sure to go standin' on a corner in Winslow, Arizona.

Be sure to NOT rest your hand on the bronze statue there.  You know, a 6 foot tall piece of metal that's been baking in the sun in the desert.

You can see from the shiny spots on the shoulders that show I'm not the only one dumb enough to do that.

[Fark user image 538x519]


In January 1973, I was on a Greyhound bus from Missouri to California.  There was a stop in Winslow, we got out to stretch our legs and the man seated next to me (a very nice hippie war vet guy) walked up to me and starting singing that song.  Who knew that would become a "tradition".

I remember Route 66.  In the winter when going back to Missouri from northern California, we'd go south from Humboldt (with a stop at the Orange Cove, CA family groves) and hook up with 66 somewhere before Barstow.  Loved the song as a little girl because it mentioned Joplin, MO.  Where a lot of my family lived (thereabouts anyway).

I think the only long drive I want to do these days is Highway 20.  The longest highway in the US.  Goes from the Oregon coast to Boston, MA.
 
2022-06-27 1:53:56 PM  

fifthofzen: [Fark user image 520x770]


Mmmm, Pink Power Ranger.
 
2022-06-27 2:02:24 PM  

Mikey1969: Baloo Uriza:

I'm unaware of any point in my life, even when US 66 existed, where photography was legal in the Pueblo Laguna territory.

Exactly, because they are on a power trip, just as I said. There's no reason for this, a camera doesn't "steal your soul". They just found something where they can sit and exercise power over others.


You sound white, Karen.
 
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