Skip to content
Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Deslidefied)   These are 27 old-fashioned food terms you will only hear in the South. Who wants some chitlins and some hoecake?   (deslide.clusterfake.net) divider line
    More: Interesting, number of slides, Lens, 1990s American television series, site, image URLs, slides  
•       •       •

1205 clicks; posted to Food » on 27 Jun 2022 at 12:25 PM (13 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



34 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-06-27 9:17:27 AM  
Wickles are great.
 
2022-06-27 9:26:45 AM  
 Hushpuppies


I don't live in the south and have never heard them called anything else.
 
2022-06-27 9:28:28 AM  

shastacola: Hushpuppies


I don't live in the south and have never heard them called anything else.


""hushpuppy" is the name for a deep-fried food made of eggs and flour and mixed with cornmeal "

Stopped taking the article seriously right there. Has this person even seen a hushpuppy recipe?
 
2022-06-27 9:31:08 AM  

shastacola: I don't live in the south and have never heard them called anything else.


Well you don't get paid $20 an article to write bullshiat for clicks, do ya?!
 
2022-06-27 9:50:21 AM  
List fails without fried okra.

//and sweet potato pie
 
2022-06-27 10:37:20 AM  
Except for 'goobers' these are not food terms, but actual regional dishes. Someone needs to stop running their headlines through the Thesaurus before sending it off.
 
2022-06-27 11:18:10 AM  
Pennsylvania is not the South
 
2022-06-27 11:57:38 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-06-27 11:59:39 AM  

cretinbob: Pennsylvania is not the South


but you'd be excused for thinking that after visiting rural PA
 
2022-06-27 12:05:23 PM  

cretinbob: Pennsylvania is not the South


I saw the shoofly pie one. I don't like it personally but it is a Pennsylvania Dutch thing (Amish say they speak this but it is more like German). That is one of the defining desserts of Lancaster County.
 
2022-06-27 12:36:14 PM  
Evy'body loves Hocakes 
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-06-27 12:37:51 PM  
"Here are 17 old-fashioned food terms you'll only ever hear in the South...."

- "Besides being a popular dish in the Southern U.S., chitlins are also a delicacy served worldwide and can be found in many Spanish, Asian, French, Jamaican, and Latin American kitchens."

- "In addition to the South, these cakes are also popular in New England."

- "The cake, which originated in Jamaica, is named after the island's national bird."

- "this delicacy has roots in both Native American and Indonesian cuisine."

- "a staple dessert of the Pennsylvania Dutch..."

- "roots are in West African cuisine, inspired most specifically by the Senegalese recipe..."


That's some mighty fine research.
 
2022-06-27 12:42:08 PM  
Possum pie sounds pretty good.
 
2022-06-27 12:45:18 PM  
I just had an (admittedly terrible, from Emerald City Fish & Chips) catfish po'boy, so I'm getting a kick...

Seriously, one of the worst meals I've had delivered in recent memory. Crab puppies fried in old oil until burned, halibut fried so hard, so dry, that it had to be torn apart with both hands because it couldn't be chewed, and a "po'boy" that was about 3 ounces of alleged catfish, if that. A friggin' blunt reminder that it's still much, much better to cook at home.
 
2022-06-27 12:47:28 PM  
I could go for some chow-chow with boiled dinner and blueberry grunt for dessert.
 
2022-06-27 12:47:34 PM  

CFitzsimmons: "Here are 17 old-fashioned food terms you'll only ever hear in the South...."

- "Besides being a popular dish in the Southern U.S., chitlins are also a delicacy served worldwide and can be found in many Spanish, Asian, French, Jamaican, and Latin American kitchens."

- "In addition to the South, these cakes are also popular in New England."

- "The cake, which originated in Jamaica, is named after the island's national bird."

- "this delicacy has roots in both Native American and Indonesian cuisine."

- "a staple dessert of the Pennsylvania Dutch..."

- "roots are in West African cuisine, inspired most specifically by the Senegalese recipe..."


That's some mighty fine research.


When you're writing a slide show, it's not like anyone's going to care - they just want pictures, yo.

And, seriously, fritters & hushpuppies are definitely a New England thing. God, I miss Rocky Point shore dinners...
 
2022-06-27 1:38:37 PM  

FormlessOne: CFitzsimmons: "Here are 17 old-fashioned food terms you'll only ever hear in the South...."

- "Besides being a popular dish in the Southern U.S., chitlins are also a delicacy served worldwide and can be found in many Spanish, Asian, French, Jamaican, and Latin American kitchens."

- "In addition to the South, these cakes are also popular in New England."

- "The cake, which originated in Jamaica, is named after the island's national bird."

- "this delicacy has roots in both Native American and Indonesian cuisine."

- "a staple dessert of the Pennsylvania Dutch..."

- "roots are in West African cuisine, inspired most specifically by the Senegalese recipe..."


That's some mighty fine research.

When you're writing a slide show, it's not like anyone's going to care - they just want pictures, yo.

And, seriously, fritters & hushpuppies are definitely a New England thing. God, I miss Rocky Point shore dinners...


Oh, I know, it's just fun to point out how poorly written the thing was.

I'm from New England as well and I fondly remember hush puppies and Johnny cakes. We also ate grits and dirty rice and all sorts of things one would "only ever hear in the South."

Just a terrible attempt at a list by this author.
 
2022-06-27 1:45:50 PM  

FormlessOne: I just had an (admittedly terrible, from Emerald City Fish & Chips) catfish po'boy, so I'm getting a kick...

Seriously, one of the worst meals I've had delivered in recent memory. Crab puppies fried in old oil until burned, halibut fried so hard, so dry, that it had to be torn apart with both hands because it couldn't be chewed, and a "po'boy" that was about 3 ounces of alleged catfish, if that. A friggin' blunt reminder that it's still much, much better to cook at home.


That place is still in business? I left Seattle 4 years ago, I remember trying it a couple times hoping they would improve, but no...pure garbage
 
2022-06-27 1:58:46 PM  

ChrisDe: Possum pie sounds pretty good.


The article indicates this is especially popular in Arkansas. I have lived in Arkansas for 45 years and have never heard of it.
 
2022-06-27 2:05:43 PM  

majestic: ChrisDe: Possum pie sounds pretty good.

The article indicates this is especially popular in Arkansas. I have lived in Arkansas for 45 years and have never heard of it.


Often the case. I was born and raised just south of Chicago and didn't hear about Chicago-style pizza or hotdogs until I moved to New Jersey. Nor did I know about ketchup being forbidden on hotdogs.
 
2022-06-27 2:39:53 PM  
Po'boy sandwiches can be found at many restaurants with Cajun themed food . I had one a while ago in Los Angeles.
 
2022-06-27 2:58:34 PM  
I heard of hush puppies and corn fritters when I was a kid growing up in northern Ohio.  Pretty much anywhere Red Lobster was, people knew of hush puppies.
 
2022-06-27 2:59:04 PM  
The headline and slideshow were both this:
michaelsemer.comView Full Size
 
2022-06-27 3:07:21 PM  
Yeah, that list is terrible, most of them are not food terms, and about half of them originate from outside the South.
 
2022-06-27 3:12:55 PM  
I'm from the heart of Appalachia, and I never heard that dish called "Killed Lettuce". Everyone here calls it "wilted lettuce salad". It is pretty awesome.
 
2022-06-27 3:21:05 PM  

FormlessOne: I just had an (admittedly terrible, from Emerald City Fish & Chips) catfish po'boy, so I'm getting a kick...

Seriously, one of the worst meals I've had delivered in recent memory. Crab puppies fried in old oil until burned, halibut fried so hard, so dry, that it had to be torn apart with both hands because it couldn't be chewed, and a "po'boy" that was about 3 ounces of alleged catfish, if that. A friggin' blunt reminder that it's still much, much better to cook at home.


I think that every time I eat in a restaurant anymore.
 
2022-06-27 5:02:20 PM  
It's spelled chitterlings.
 
2022-06-27 5:07:38 PM  

discgolfguru: I'm from the heart of Appalachia, and I never heard that dish called "Killed Lettuce". Everyone here calls it "wilted lettuce salad". It is pretty awesome.


Wisconsinite here with no connection to Appalachia or the south but I grew up on wilted lettuce salad and yes, that is what we called it. I also grew up with divinity and make it for Christmas every year.
 
2022-06-27 5:35:20 PM  
I don't live in the South and I've heard of nearly everything on that list except for Wickles, Killed Lettuce, and Possum Pie.

A large number of the foods listed there are very common outside of the South like corn fritters and hushpuppies to name a few. And when you have to stretch to include dishes from states that aren't even in the South, that's just bullsh*t.

And after copying and pasting the link into a new window, it came from Eat This, Not That. I expect nothing but sh*tty articles from that site.
 
2022-06-27 5:37:48 PM  

eyeq360: I don't live in the South and I've heard of nearly everything on that list except for Wickles, Killed Lettuce, and Possum Pie.

A large number of the foods listed there are very common outside of the South like corn fritters and hushpuppies to name a few. And when you have to stretch to include dishes from states that aren't even in the South, that's just bullsh*t.

And after copying and pasting the link into a new window, it came from Eat This, Not That. I expect nothing but sh*tty articles from that site.


Wickles are yummy.  We have them in the supermarket in AZ.  They are a lovely snacking pickle.
 
2022-06-27 8:40:17 PM  
Alas, my days of hoecake are behind me.
 
2022-06-27 10:26:03 PM  

rosekolodny: eyeq360: I don't live in the South and I've heard of nearly everything on that list except for Wickles, Killed Lettuce, and Possum Pie.

A large number of the foods listed there are very common outside of the South like corn fritters and hushpuppies to name a few. And when you have to stretch to include dishes from states that aren't even in the South, that's just bullsh*t.

And after copying and pasting the link into a new window, it came from Eat This, Not That. I expect nothing but sh*tty articles from that site.

Wickles are yummy.  We have them in the supermarket in AZ.  They are a lovely snacking pickle.


That sounds wickipulous, I mean ripickulous, wikipikulous even. Pass that jar!
 
2022-06-28 6:34:36 AM  
I dunno... "Kool-Aid Pickles" sounds like an abomination.

/never had them
//pretty sure I don't want to
///not a pickle fan in the first place
 
2022-06-28 8:50:16 AM  

Turtlefarker: FormlessOne: I just had an (admittedly terrible, from Emerald City Fish & Chips) catfish po'boy, so I'm getting a kick...

Seriously, one of the worst meals I've had delivered in recent memory. Crab puppies fried in old oil until burned, halibut fried so hard, so dry, that it had to be torn apart with both hands because it couldn't be chewed, and a "po'boy" that was about 3 ounces of alleged catfish, if that. A friggin' blunt reminder that it's still much, much better to cook at home.

That place is still in business? I left Seattle 4 years ago, I remember trying it a couple times hoping they would improve, but no...pure garbage


We didn't know - we gave them a shot via delivery, because the wife wanted fish & chips, and, hoo-boy, they ain't good.
 
Displayed 34 of 34 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.