Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(NOAA)   Do you want to see if you should be converting your house into a house boat? Cool and creepy tags fought it out an cool won since it's an actually decent simulator published by a governmental agency   (coast.noaa.gov) divider line
    More: Cool, Oceanography, Storm surge, Flood, Water, Tide, Ocean, New sea level rise scenarios, Water levels  
•       •       •

3490 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Jun 2022 at 1:05 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



40 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-06-25 1:07:01 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-06-25 1:10:19 AM  
I'm a hundred feet above an artificial lake that's a thousand miles from the sea. I'm more concerned about the asteroids.
 
2022-06-25 1:10:46 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


Let's hear it for San Francisco hills. Looks like my lab may be a bit wet though.
 
2022-06-25 1:17:39 AM  
My little corner in the woods water at 20137 is all underwater for some reason. Pretty sure it still floatin.

Nice green subby! nice sim
 
2022-06-25 2:11:02 AM  
Googling "Raise house on stilts" as I sit here
 
2022-06-25 2:12:51 AM  
Water wars are not far off.
Coastal areas flooded.
Inner Africa deforested and dry.
Asia major not far behind.
Minnesota, Canada and Scandinavia.
Gonna make oil look like tits.
 
2022-06-25 2:14:38 AM  
Dammit, I cranked the sea level rise all the way up, and I'm still not beachfront.
 
2022-06-25 2:21:05 AM  

dbirchall: Dammit, I cranked the sea level rise all the way up, and I'm still not beachfront.


Have you thought about moving to Otisburg?

/contact Lex Luther Realty today!
 
2022-06-25 2:23:03 AM  
OK. I picked the wrong time to move to Florida.
 
2022-06-25 2:30:14 AM  
Washington DC metro region?

It'll be just like Venice, just less sustainable.
 
2022-06-25 2:34:40 AM  
well my house is safe from becoming a house boat but uh... the bridge that leads to the road that my house is on will become a rather crappy ecologically unsound reef.
 
2022-06-25 2:56:09 AM  
guaranteed 12 inches above mean high tide
 
2022-06-25 3:13:48 AM  

daffy: OK. I picked the wrong time to move to Florida.


There is never a right time to move to florida unless you want to have styrofoam furniture and rebuild your trailer every hurricane
 
2022-06-25 3:46:27 AM  

Iamos: [Fark user image image 264x320]

Let's hear it for San Francisco hills. Looks like my lab may be a bit wet though.


SFO will be completely under water in two weeks tops, maybe three. Make sure you top up your car with $7 a gallon gas.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-06-25 5:25:58 AM  
Clearly the solution is more guns. The solution is always more guns.
 
2022-06-25 6:21:02 AM  
I'm high and dry so I got that going for me. Hope they wrote this in COBOL.
 
2022-06-25 6:50:26 AM  
My dock is going to need some reenforcement but even at highest tide it still has 5 feet of height above the ocean. More worried about winter storms taking it out. Its basically built on a cliff.
 
2022-06-25 7:06:16 AM  
I checked out a Canadian flood map... Montreal is screwed.  Surprisingly (at least to me), Ottawa gets to take a hit as well, and the populated areas of BC are NOT going to have fun.

I assumed PEI will just disappear under the waves, but for some reason according to the maps it'll be fine.  HOW?  It's barely above the water as it is!
 
2022-06-25 8:53:36 AM  
Nice to see lake Champlain unaffected
 
2022-06-25 8:57:16 AM  

Concrete Donkey: daffy: OK. I picked the wrong time to move to Florida.

There is never a right time to move to florida unless you want to have styrofoam furniture and rebuild your trailer every hurricane


I actually live in an apartment and they Styrofoam furniture may come in very handy.
 
2022-06-25 9:28:35 AM  
With ten feet of flooding, the shores of small nearby creek will move to within 200 yards of my house. Considering the amount of Florida that will disappear, this is an exchange I'm willing to make.
 
2022-06-25 10:00:23 AM  
Nice to know Canada won't be affected at all. Phew.
 
2022-06-25 10:35:43 AM  
I'm good. I think the ocean would have to raise 500ft. All the farkers moving from the coast would suck
 
2022-06-25 10:36:05 AM  
What really amuses me is there is not a single plan for moving the major ports inland so they can still be usable
 
2022-06-25 10:37:31 AM  
Can houseboats have basements ?   Water would have to rise 60+ feet to get near my house....  bought this house primarily on location : not in a flood zone and high point in the area.. also no apartments in bullet range.. (hand gun)..
 
2022-06-25 10:48:56 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-06-25 11:10:43 AM  

justanotherfarkinfarker: I'm good. I think the ocean would have to raise 500ft. All the farkers moving from the coast would suck


If you could arrange for it to happen quickly enough, the migration problem solves itself.
 
2022-06-25 11:14:13 AM  
Hey everyone, let's make a cool website to teach people about climate change, but we'll make it incompatible with phones so it won't work for 95% of site visitors.
 
2022-06-25 11:19:31 AM  

Unsung_Hero: I checked out a Canadian flood map... Montreal is screwed.  Surprisingly (at least to me), Ottawa gets to take a hit as well, and the populated areas of BC are NOT going to have fun.

I assumed PEI will just disappear under the waves, but for some reason according to the maps it'll be fine.  HOW?  It's barely above the water as it is!


Richmond, in the lower mainland of BC, is already below sea level. There's going to be an epic flood any day now. I have family that lives there, a block from the dykes. I have no idea why they haven't sold (for a fortune) and moved somewhere a bit safer.
 
2022-06-25 11:39:59 AM  

Russ1642: Richmond, in the lower mainland of BC, is already below sea level.


Richmond is officially 1m ASL (average).  That's not a lot, and presumably there are a lot of areas within its borders below sea level.  That would make me a bit nervous... but I'm used to living almost 100m ASL and the only 'ocean' I can see from here is a Great Lake, which I am also comfortably above.
 
2022-06-25 11:55:24 AM  

Unsung_Hero: Russ1642: Richmond, in the lower mainland of BC, is already below sea level.

Richmond is officially 1m ASL (average).  That's not a lot, and presumably there are a lot of areas within its borders below sea level.  That would make me a bit nervous... but I'm used to living almost 100m ASL and the only 'ocean' I can see from here is a Great Lake, which I am also comfortably above.


If you're below the water level at high tide you're below sea level. It's not the average that matters. When a quake hits that area they're gone. The ground will liquify and heavy buildings will sink. But that won't matter much because the flooding will do the real damage.
 
2022-06-25 12:05:15 PM  

Russ1642: Unsung_Hero: Russ1642: Richmond, in the lower mainland of BC, is already below sea level.

Richmond is officially 1m ASL (average).  That's not a lot, and presumably there are a lot of areas within its borders below sea level.  That would make me a bit nervous... but I'm used to living almost 100m ASL and the only 'ocean' I can see from here is a Great Lake, which I am also comfortably above.

If you're below the water level at high tide you're below sea level. It's not the average that matters. When a quake hits that area they're gone. The ground will liquify and heavy buildings will sink. But that won't matter much because the flooding will do the real damage.


1) Now you KNOW I grew up around much more reliable Great Lakes where the risks of flooding due to rainfall or wind-driven sloshing are minimal.

2) Obviously Richmond is fine with current high tides.  They have what, a 2m differential between high and low?  So if their mean elevation is 1m ASL, then high tide would bring that down to 0, which presumably is when the dikes come into play.

But yeah, that seems like a pretty dangerous situation even before future sea level rise is accounted for.  An earthquake or even a relatively small tsunami and they're going to have a bad time.
 
2022-06-25 12:19:38 PM  

Unsung_Hero: Russ1642: Unsung_Hero: Russ1642: Richmond, in the lower mainland of BC, is already below sea level.

Richmond is officially 1m ASL (average).  That's not a lot, and presumably there are a lot of areas within its borders below sea level.  That would make me a bit nervous... but I'm used to living almost 100m ASL and the only 'ocean' I can see from here is a Great Lake, which I am also comfortably above.

If you're below the water level at high tide you're below sea level. It's not the average that matters. When a quake hits that area they're gone. The ground will liquify and heavy buildings will sink. But that won't matter much because the flooding will do the real damage.

1) Now you KNOW I grew up around much more reliable Great Lakes where the risks of flooding due to rainfall or wind-driven sloshing are minimal.

2) Obviously Richmond is fine with current high tides.  They have what, a 2m differential between high and low?  So if their mean elevation is 1m ASL, then high tide would bring that down to 0, which presumably is when the dikes come into play.

But yeah, that seems like a pretty dangerous situation even before future sea level rise is accounted for.  An earthquake or even a relatively small tsunami and they're going to have a bad time.


I grew up in Langley, pretty close to Richmond, so I don't know why you pulled the great lakes thing out of your ass. The difference between high and low tides there is 3.5m just this month. During king tides the difference is around 4.4m. But it really isn't tides that will take out Richmond, it's an earthquake. The dykes will fail, the city will sink, and when high tide hits it's gone.
 
2022-06-25 12:39:07 PM  

Russ1642: I grew up in Langley, pretty close to Richmond, so I don't know why you pulled the great lakes thing out of your ass.


Read my comment again. It's where I grew up.  It was to explain my lack of direct experience with tides.
 
2022-06-25 5:12:32 PM  

Concrete Donkey: daffy: OK. I picked the wrong time to move to Florida.

There is never a right time to move to florida unless you want to have styrofoam furniture and rebuild your trailer every hurricane


They could put pontoons and a motor on it instead.
 
2022-06-25 7:44:47 PM  
This is my house on the extreme right, the red one.

This is my street from my porch.  That's not tar, it's the tide.  Six inches of water in the middle of the street.  A storm with a high tide, strong onshore winds, and full moon.  The water lapped 1 inch up my curbing.  It's only a matter of time before we have to abandon the neighborhood.

Funny too, how the house is 200 years old.  Hundreds of people have lived in it for generations.  And we'll be the last ones.

Fark user imageView Full Size
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-06-26 12:58:10 AM  

claytonemery: the house is 200 years old.  Hundreds of people have lived in it


Hundreds of people?  Catholics?

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-06-26 9:33:13 AM  

claytonemery: This is my house on the extreme right, the red one.

This is my street from my porch.  That's not tar, it's the tide.  Six inches of water in the middle of the street.  A storm with a high tide, strong onshore winds, and full moon.  The water lapped 1 inch up my curbing.  It's only a matter of time before we have to abandon the neighborhood.

Funny too, how the house is 200 years old.  Hundreds of people have lived in it for generations.  And we'll be the last ones.

[Fark user image 850x425][Fark user image 850x637]


Stick with 'many people', which is accurate.... holds off the trolls...  nice house, nice area, but nothing is forever.. at some point in the past, that was all ice.. glaciers and all that.   Could happen again.
 
2022-06-26 9:41:10 AM  

OlderGuy: claytonemery: This is my house on the extreme right, the red one.

This is my street from my porch.  That's not tar, it's the tide.  Six inches of water in the middle of the street.  A storm with a high tide, strong onshore winds, and full moon.  The water lapped 1 inch up my curbing.  It's only a matter of time before we have to abandon the neighborhood.

Funny too, how the house is 200 years old.  Hundreds of people have lived in it for generations.  And we'll be the last ones.

[Fark user image 850x425][Fark user image 850x637]

Stick with 'many people', which is accurate.... holds off the trolls...  nice house, nice area, but nothing is forever.. at some point in the past, that was all ice.. glaciers and all that.   Could happen again.


I've done a lot of Colonial research, and written books about it.  In Colonial times, a 6 room house could have had 22 people living in it.  Including the servants in the freezing-boiling attic and the one who slept on a pallet on the kitchen floor.  The idea of two people sharing a house is a modern invention.
 
2022-06-26 12:33:10 PM  

claytonemery: OlderGuy: claytonemery: This is my house on the extreme right, the red one.

This is my street from my porch.  That's not tar, it's the tide.  Six inches of water in the middle of the street.  A storm with a high tide, strong onshore winds, and full moon.  The water lapped 1 inch up my curbing.  It's only a matter of time before we have to abandon the neighborhood.

Funny too, how the house is 200 years old.  Hundreds of people have lived in it for generations.  And we'll be the last ones.

[Fark user image 850x425][Fark user image 850x637]

Stick with 'many people', which is accurate.... holds off the trolls...  nice house, nice area, but nothing is forever.. at some point in the past, that was all ice.. glaciers and all that.   Could happen again.

I've done a lot of Colonial research, and written books about it.  In Colonial times, a 6 room house could have had 22 people living in it.  Including the servants in the freezing-boiling attic and the one who slept on a pallet on the kitchen floor.  The idea of two people sharing a house is a modern invention.


Also did research, plus growing up in Colonial Williamsburg, Va... slaves had separate quarters, and cooking was done in a separate building, to lower the chance of burning down the house..  people didn't live that long, but they usually did have larger families.. more than 100 is definitely possible.
 
Displayed 40 of 40 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.