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(Makers)   The case for protecting US manufacturing   (theprepared.org) divider line
    More: Interesting, Economics, Manufacturing, Economy, Industry, stock of the manufactured goods, Vaclav Smil, reinvigoration of manufacturing, support businesses  
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742 clicks; posted to Business » on 24 Jun 2022 at 10:30 PM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



35 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-06-24 7:32:23 PM  
What manufacturing are you talking about subby? The United States doesn't manufacture much of anything anymore.
 
2022-06-24 7:36:31 PM  

solokumba: What manufacturing are you talking about subby? The United States doesn't manufacture much of anything anymore.


The US manufactures more than ever, it just doesn't employ many people to do it.
 
2022-06-24 8:25:26 PM  

OptionC: solokumba: What manufacturing are you talking about subby? The United States doesn't manufacture much of anything anymore.

The US manufactures more than ever, it just doesn't employ many people to do it.


It still employs tons of people, but journalists don't hang out with any of them.  Every town in this country with a population between 10K and 100K has a manufacturing industry presence.  It's just that there's always room for more and, boy, sure would've been nice to make a few of our own microchips.
 
2022-06-24 8:51:16 PM  

Naido: It still employs tons of people, but journalists don't hang out with any of them.


What is tons of people?

Manufacturing in the United States was at its peak in 1979.
Every year since 1979 it has dwindled.
Prove how strong it is now.
 
2022-06-24 10:30:51 PM  

solokumba: Naido: It still employs tons of people, but journalists don't hang out with any of them.

What is tons of people?

Manufacturing in the United States was at its peak in 1979.
Every year since 1979 it has dwindled.
Prove how strong it is now.


https://www.census.gov/library/stories/2020/10/manufacturing-still-among-top-five-united-states-employers.html
 
2022-06-24 10:53:42 PM  

Naido: solokumba: Naido: It still employs tons of people, but journalists don't hang out with any of them.

What is tons of people?

Manufacturing in the United States was at its peak in 1979.
Every year since 1979 it has dwindled.
Prove how strong it is now.

https://www.census.gov/library/stories/2020/10/manufacturing-still-among-top-five-united-states-employers.html


That's not saying much.
 
2022-06-24 11:27:54 PM  

solokumba: Naido: solokumba: Naido: It still employs tons of people, but journalists don't hang out with any of them.

What is tons of people?

Manufacturing in the United States was at its peak in 1979.
Every year since 1979 it has dwindled.
Prove how strong it is now.

https://www.census.gov/library/stories/2020/10/manufacturing-still-among-top-five-united-states-employers.html

That's not saying much.


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2022-06-24 11:41:31 PM  
The US is number 2 worldwide for manufacturing. It has real gaps and issues but it a LOT of manufacturing is done here. It's just that PLCs and machinery have greatly reduced the human element. I experienced this first hand when I worked in industrial maintenance.
cdn.statcdn.comView Full Size
 
2022-06-25 12:06:33 AM  

adamatari: The US is number 2 worldwide for manufacturing. It has real gaps and issues but it a LOT of manufacturing is done here. It's just that PLCs and machinery have greatly reduced the human element. I experienced this first hand when I worked in industrial maintenance.
[cdn.statcdn.com image 850x850]


And the top manufacturing companies in the US are oil companies and tech companies.
US manufacturing does not mean that the products are made in the US.

Any company can be a manufacturer, even if their products are made in other countries.
 
2022-06-25 12:07:06 AM  

adamatari: The US is number 2 worldwide for manufacturing. It has real gaps and issues but it a LOT of manufacturing is done here. It's just that PLCs and machinery have greatly reduced the human element. I experienced this first hand when I worked in industrial maintenance.
[cdn.statcdn.com image 850x850]


So US manufacturing isn't tough enough?


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2022-06-25 12:34:50 AM  
The US mostly got out of manufacturing consumer goods, the profit margins are negligible and it makes sense to go for the cheapest labor you can find.  When it comes to manufacturing commercial goods it makes sense to pay more for skilled workers as the profit margins are substantial but the quality demands are higher.

The machines that made your coffee machine were probably made in Germany, Japan and the USA at a factory that uses equipment made the Germany, Japan and the USA... Italy also makes the odd appearance here and there.

Long story short, we make the machines that make the products.
 
2022-06-25 12:39:02 AM  
Ctrl +F "national security "

There you go.
 
2022-06-25 1:10:01 AM  

electricjebus: The US mostly got out of manufacturing consumer goods, the profit margins are negligible and it makes sense to go for the cheapest labor you can find.  When it comes to manufacturing commercial goods it makes sense to pay more for skilled workers as the profit margins are substantial but the quality demands are higher.

The machines that made your coffee machine were probably made in Germany, Japan and the USA at a factory that uses equipment made the Germany, Japan and the USA... Italy also makes the odd appearance here and there.

Long story short, we make the machines that make the products.


We make bombs and weapons. That is our export.
 
2022-06-25 4:00:49 AM  

electricjebus: The US mostly got out of manufacturing consumer goods, the profit margins are negligible and it makes sense to go for the cheapest labor you can find.  When it comes to manufacturing commercial goods it makes sense to pay more for skilled workers as the profit margins are substantial but the quality demands are higher.

The machines that made your coffee machine were probably made in Germany, Japan and the USA at a factory that uses equipment made the Germany, Japan and the USA... Italy also makes the odd appearance here and there.

Long story short, we make the machines that make the products.


A lighting company I worked for had some manufacturing in China and I went over there occasionally to supervise the assembly line. In the factory they also manufactured cell phone cases (Otter Box cell phone cases specifically.) The injection molding machines they used were all manufactured in Europe and imported to China. All the factory did was source the plastic and the workers, the actual manufacturing was mostly all done by the European machines.
 
2022-06-25 7:46:17 AM  
Boeing, Caterpillar, and Deere don't make anything?
 
2022-06-25 8:05:40 AM  
Once upon a time we had things called "tariffs," where you paid extra to import stuff made in another country. That way you kept jerbs in your own country.

Then along came globalization, which took the government out of the equation and sent jerbs overseas. Jerbs that could have gone to people with red hats.
 
2022-06-25 8:12:00 AM  
Automobiles and heavy equipment (CAT stuff) comes to mind around me. Central Illinois makes lots of CAT equipment.

Made in Decatur IL:

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-06-25 8:58:28 AM  

solokumba: Naido: It still employs tons of people, but journalists don't hang out with any of them.

What is tons of people?

Manufacturing in the United States was at its peak in 1979.
Every year since 1979 it has dwindled.
Prove how strong it is now.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-06-25 9:22:17 AM  

Rapmaster2000: Boeing, Caterpillar, and Deere don't make anything?


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-06-25 9:29:53 AM  

mrmopar5287: Automobiles and heavy equipment (CAT stuff) comes to mind around me. Central Illinois makes lots of CAT equipment.

Made in Decatur IL:

[Fark user image 425x298]


Every household needs one of those.
Flint Michigan makes cars too.
Oh wait... Flint doesn't make anything anymore.
 
2022-06-25 9:37:15 AM  

solokumba: Every household needs one of those.


Payload capacity is 400 tons, so you could carry the house in the dump bed.

Fuel capacity is 1,000 gallons, so that's a $5,000 fill up if off-road Diesel is $5 a gallon.
 
2022-06-25 9:41:26 AM  

mrmopar5287: solokumba: Every household needs one of those.

Payload capacity is 400 tons, so you could carry the house in the dump bed.

Fuel capacity is 1,000 gallons, so that's a $5,000 fill up if off-road Diesel is $5 a gallon.


Mother Nature is thrilled to have these.
 
2022-06-25 9:45:36 AM  

solokumba: Rapmaster2000: Boeing, Caterpillar, and Deere don't make anything?

[Fark user image image 757x193]


And plenty is made in the US.  There is a massive factory in Waterloo Iowa. It would be pretty stupid to manufacture farm equipment in Argentina and export it to your largest market which is the US.  That's cost prohibitive.

Once upon a time I was offered a job to work for Deere in Cedar Rapids.

I get it that the TV says all manufacturing is gone because you can't go work for US Steel straight out of high school, but they still make plenty of steel with 1/10th of the workers they needed 50 years ago.  You should go to Indiana.  It seems half of my Purdue classmates manage a factory there.
 
2022-06-25 9:59:47 AM  

Rapmaster2000: solokumba: Rapmaster2000: Boeing, Caterpillar, and Deere don't make anything?

[Fark user image image 757x193]

And plenty is made in the US.  There is a massive factory in Waterloo Iowa. It would be pretty stupid to manufacture farm equipment in Argentina and export it to your largest market which is the US.  That's cost prohibitive.

Once upon a time I was offered a job to work for Deere in Cedar Rapids.

I get it that the TV says all manufacturing is gone because you can't go work for US Steel straight out of high school, but they still make plenty of steel with 1/10th of the workers they needed 50 years ago.  You should go to Indiana.  It seems half of my Purdue classmates manage a factory there.


Plenty.
Tons.
Very descriptive words.
 
2022-06-25 10:03:50 AM  

solokumba: Rapmaster2000: solokumba: Rapmaster2000: Boeing, Caterpillar, and Deere don't make anything?

[Fark user image image 757x193]

And plenty is made in the US.  There is a massive factory in Waterloo Iowa. It would be pretty stupid to manufacture farm equipment in Argentina and export it to your largest market which is the US.  That's cost prohibitive.

Once upon a time I was offered a job to work for Deere in Cedar Rapids.

I get it that the TV says all manufacturing is gone because you can't go work for US Steel straight out of high school, but they still make plenty of steel with 1/10th of the workers they needed 50 years ago.  You should go to Indiana.  It seems half of my Purdue classmates manage a factory there.

Plenty.
Tons.
Very descriptive words.


I feel no need to apply a burden that you won't apply to yourself.  Maybe if you hadn't started with "The United States doesn't manufacture much of anything anymore."

Much of anything anymore.
 
2022-06-25 10:16:06 AM  

OptionC: solokumba: What manufacturing are you talking about subby? The United States doesn't manufacture much of anything anymore.

The US manufactures more than ever, it just doesn't employ many people to do it.


Sure it does.  The manufactured rage machine employs multiple shiat loads of people.
 
2022-06-25 10:24:01 AM  

Rapmaster2000: solokumba: Rapmaster2000: solokumba: Rapmaster2000: Boeing, Caterpillar, and Deere don't make anything?

[Fark user image image 757x193]

And plenty is made in the US.  There is a massive factory in Waterloo Iowa. It would be pretty stupid to manufacture farm equipment in Argentina and export it to your largest market which is the US.  That's cost prohibitive.

Once upon a time I was offered a job to work for Deere in Cedar Rapids.

I get it that the TV says all manufacturing is gone because you can't go work for US Steel straight out of high school, but they still make plenty of steel with 1/10th of the workers they needed 50 years ago.  You should go to Indiana.  It seems half of my Purdue classmates manage a factory there.

Plenty.
Tons.
Very descriptive words.

I feel no need to apply a burden that you won't apply to yourself.  Maybe if you hadn't started with "The United States doesn't manufacture much of anything anymore."

Much of anything anymore.


Here is a word that is not descriptive.
UNIONS
 
2022-06-25 11:43:22 AM  

Rapmaster2000: And plenty is made in the US.  There is a massive factory in Waterloo Iowa. It would be pretty stupid to manufacture farm equipment in Argentina and export it to your largest market which is the US.  That's cost prohibitive.


lolwut? That's how a huge portion, maybe the majority, of products make it to you. From other countries and continents. Shipping a finished product from one location is going to be less expensive than if you had to pay fair local wages. If that wasn't the case, we wouldn't have a global economy.

Once upon a time I was offered a job to work for Deere in Cedar Rapids.

.... And that's somehow relevant?
 
2022-06-25 12:15:46 PM  

solokumba: Blah, blah, blah... more dis-ingenuine horseshiat.


I make product labeling and decals for many local and national manufacturers. Every one of my customers is a manufacturer, maker, creator of something for sale.
I would have no business if it wasn't all of the items being made in the US today. My business is one of thousands across the US that provide the same kind of products. It is an industry that does billions of dollars alone.
To say that US manufacturing has declined is fair if you look at it through the lens of large corporations.
Things have changed and I don't think its entirely a bad thing. If you look at from the local level you will notice that literally every street in America (rural and urban) has a small business, a maker, a crafter or a service provider.
THAT is what made America and that is what we do. Period.
 
2022-06-25 8:26:43 PM  

DMDmarty: solokumba: Blah, blah, blah... more dis-ingenuine horseshiat.

I make product labeling and decals for many local and national manufacturers. Every one of my customers is a manufacturer, maker, creator of something for sale.
I would have no business if it wasn't all of the items being made in the US today. My business is one of thousands across the US that provide the same kind of products. It is an industry that does billions of dollars alone.
To say that US manufacturing has declined is fair if you look at it through the lens of large corporations.
Things have changed and I don't think its entirely a bad thing. If you look at from the local level you will notice that literally every street in America (rural and urban) has a small business, a maker, a crafter or a service provider.
THAT is what made America and that is what we do. Period.


Cool. What is your ETSY address?
 
2022-06-25 8:56:29 PM  

solokumba: Naido: It still employs tons of people, but journalists don't hang out with any of them.

What is tons of people?

Manufacturing in the United States was at its peak in 1979.
Every year since 1979 it has dwindled.
Prove how strong it is now.


Manufacturing for consumer level disposable goods is pretty much non-existant in the US, if that's what you're saying. Spatulas, toothbrushes, small toys, clothing. Yeah, that's gone. And good riddance. China and Thailand can make cheap crap cheaper than anybody else.

Manufacturing for long term consumer goods like furniture and cars, yeah, the US is still pretty solid. There is money to be made in something built to last for a couple of decades.

Manufacturing for intermediate goods and high precision machines are dominated by American firms. American labor makes the machines that go to China to make the plastic toys that get sold at the dollar store. And they're some of the best in the world at it.

What you're complaining about is the "uncool" side of industrial output. Nobody gives a shiat where their elevator counterweight systems come from (Otis Elevators in Connecticut, with a major plant in South Carolina), but that is all made with American quality. What dumbasses in flyover states want is the Leave It To Beaver "cool" manufacturing - consumable stuff with gruff men in hardhats that gets shipped everywhere in the country thanks to Sears.

Screw that. Jobs didn't disappear because American labor is inferior. They disappeared because robots are cheaper. American firms produce output at a scale unheard of in 1955 at a lower cost-basis, which explains why price inflation of consumer goods has been so limited since 1990. If you want to know where all that savings and efficiency went if the middle class is still hurt, blame the shareholders.
 
2022-06-25 9:18:21 PM  

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: Manufacturing for consumer level disposable goods is pretty much non-existant in the US, if that's what you're saying. Spatulas, toothbrushes, small toys, clothing. Yeah, that's gone. And good riddance. China and Thailand can make cheap crap cheaper than anybody else.


Mt Colgate 360 toothbrushes ($3) say made in Switzerland. I have no idea how that is advantageous over Ohio.
 
2022-06-25 10:45:44 PM  

margarito bandito: Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: Manufacturing for consumer level disposable goods is pretty much non-existant in the US, if that's what you're saying. Spatulas, toothbrushes, small toys, clothing. Yeah, that's gone. And good riddance. China and Thailand can make cheap crap cheaper than anybody else.

Mt Colgate 360 toothbrushes ($3) say made in Switzerland. I have no idea how that is advantageous over Ohio.


Same here. I do know that when shipping barges get stuck or are behind schedule US shelves become bare.
We do have oil.
But for some reason, the price is based on the global economy.
We make cars, but they need chips. Who makes chips. Not the US.
WE DO OFFER 84 MONTH FINANCING ON CARS.
 
2022-06-26 2:49:30 AM  

solokumba: margarito bandito: Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: Manufacturing for consumer level disposable goods is pretty much non-existant in the US, if that's what you're saying. Spatulas, toothbrushes, small toys, clothing. Yeah, that's gone. And good riddance. China and Thailand can make cheap crap cheaper than anybody else.

Mt Colgate 360 toothbrushes ($3) say made in Switzerland. I have no idea how that is advantageous over Ohio.

Same here. I do know that when shipping barges get stuck or are behind schedule US shelves become bare.
We do have oil.
But for some reason, the price is based on the global economy.
We make cars, but they need chips. Who makes chips. Not the US.
WE DO OFFER 84 MONTH FINANCING ON CARS.


icinsights.comView Full Size
 
2022-06-26 9:12:12 AM  

solokumba: DMDmarty: solokumba: Blah, blah, blah... more dis-ingenuine horseshiat.

I make product labeling and decals for many local and national manufacturers. Every one of my customers is a manufacturer, maker, creator of something for sale.
I would have no business if it wasn't all of the items being made in the US today. My business is one of thousands across the US that provide the same kind of products. It is an industry that does billions of dollars alone.
To say that US manufacturing has declined is fair if you look at it through the lens of large corporations.
Things have changed and I don't think its entirely a bad thing. If you look at from the local level you will notice that literally every street in America (rural and urban) has a small business, a maker, a crafter or a service provider.
THAT is what made America and that is what we do. Period.

Cool. What is your ETSY address?


Wow, what a pos you are. Thanks I don't sell one etsy.
 
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