Skip to content
Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Abc.net.au)   Biological defleecing to save farmers from the back breaking labour of shearing   (abc.net.au) divider line
    More: Cool, Wool, Merino, merino sheep, Emeritus professor Phil Hynd, Research body, Mulesing, Domestic sheep, wool producers  
•       •       •

644 clicks; posted to STEM » on 21 Jun 2022 at 3:55 AM (23 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

 
2022-06-21 5:25:58 AM  
6 votes:

Kat09tails: I would think that with the value of fleece in the toilet because the wool mills and other textile industries going offshore the solution would be more of a conversion to hair sheep for the meat sheep industry. Most sheep are shorn at a loss in the west. Hair sheep shed their coat without needing be sheared where wooled sheep MUST be sheared regularly.


Wool isn't a synthetic product, you can move a wool mill offshore but that doesn't change where the wool itself comes from.

NZ and Australia are doing absolutely fine producing wool.
 
2022-06-21 12:45:06 AM  
1 vote:
 
2022-06-21 1:25:48 AM  
1 vote:
All shearers have soft, smooth hands.
 
2022-06-21 10:03:54 AM  
1 vote:
Wool is an amazing material. I do not think about it much, frankly, but it has an important niche.

Neat article and of course it is labor intensive.

I am not excited about going for chemicals, but not for any particular reason. As long as everyone is careful about it and the material is not affected.

I wonder if anyone has tried a different approach of "half automating" the process, with mechanical shearing of the broad surfaces, with some guy or guys doing the faces and difficult contours to clean the animals up. I wonder if you could train the animals to come to stalls for regular automated brushing so that they like it and feel comfortable with it, and then one day, they come in and get snipped instead of brushed. They might not even know the difference untll it is all over.

Certainly not an expert, but those are pretty high rates for shearing.
 
Displayed 4 of 4 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.