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(Medical Xpress)   A single brain scan can now diagnose Alzheimer's but you're going to need *at least* 3 follow-ups and a few consults to make it worthwhile for your insurance company   (medicalxpress.com) divider line
    More: Followup, Alzheimer's disease, Neurology, Brain, Magnetic resonance imaging, Neuroimaging, Medical imaging, early stage, raft of tests  
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495 clicks; posted to STEM » on 20 Jun 2022 at 8:05 AM (14 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



5 Comments     (+0 »)
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2022-06-20 7:35:08 AM  
I'm a little confused here, subby. Do you think that the insurance company, which pays for unnecessary procedures, is the one that profits from them?

Or is the idea that our fictional insurance company paying more to doctors and outpatient facilities so that they can later raise rates?  Because I really think that the insurance companies think far more short term here.
 
2022-06-20 8:36:03 AM  

BigMax: I'm a little confused here, subby. Do you think that the insurance company, which pays for unnecessary procedures, is the one that profits from them?

Or is the idea that our fictional insurance company paying more to doctors and outpatient facilities so that they can later raise rates?  Because I really think that the insurance companies think far more short term here.


I think he is stating that since it is new insurance won't cover it. Also, given that we have no effective treatments it is unclear if an earlier diagnosis is beneficial, then that might be another reason to not cover the imaging.

It also appears that much of the disease process in Alzheimer's is tied to insulin resistance. Might be better off aggressively screening for and treating prediabetes. Very difficult to change the American diet but the glp-1 based drugs are promising.
 
2022-06-20 9:31:48 AM  

The_Homeless_Guy: BigMax: I'm a little confused here, subby. Do you think that the insurance company, which pays for unnecessary procedures, is the one that profits from them?

Or is the idea that our fictional insurance company paying more to doctors and outpatient facilities so that they can later raise rates?  Because I really think that the insurance companies think far more short term here.

I think he is stating that since it is new insurance won't cover it. Also, given that we have no effective treatments it is unclear if an earlier diagnosis is beneficial, then that might be another reason to not cover the imaging.

It also appears that much of the disease process in Alzheimer's is tied to insulin resistance. Might be better off aggressively screening for and treating prediabetes. Very difficult to change the American diet but the glp-1 based drugs are promising.


The main benefit of an early diagnosis is the patient's ability to make provisions for when they can no longer live independently. Few people actually set up power of attorney, make their wishes for their treatment known, or consider a long term care insurance plan until they're overdue for it.
 
2022-06-20 11:06:20 AM  
This sounds suspiciously like healthcare, so not Kaiser.
 
2022-06-20 12:46:36 PM  

Calamity Gin: The_Homeless_Guy: BigMax: I'm a little confused here, subby. Do you think that the insurance company, which pays for unnecessary procedures, is the one that profits from them?

Or is the idea that our fictional insurance company paying more to doctors and outpatient facilities so that they can later raise rates?  Because I really think that the insurance companies think far more short term here.

I think he is stating that since it is new insurance won't cover it. Also, given that we have no effective treatments it is unclear if an earlier diagnosis is beneficial, then that might be another reason to not cover the imaging.

It also appears that much of the disease process in Alzheimer's is tied to insulin resistance. Might be better off aggressively screening for and treating prediabetes. Very difficult to change the American diet but the glp-1 based drugs are promising.

The main benefit of an early diagnosis is the patient's ability to make provisions for when they can no longer live independently. Few people actually set up power of attorney, make their wishes for their treatment known, or consider a long term care insurance plan until they're overdue for it.


agreed, but that will be the insurance company's argument.
 
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