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(Some Guy)   David Lynch: "American cinema in the hands of moneymakers who only cater to teenagers and make the former studio moguls of the 20th century look like great humanist intellectuals"   (worldofreel.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Film, Top Gun, Thierry Fremaux, 20th century, David Lynch, Sonic the Hedgehog, Lost City, later date  
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834 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 19 Jun 2022 at 3:13 AM (23 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-06-18 11:25:02 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-06-18 11:32:35 PM  
Let the kids enjoy their superhero movies, David.
 
2022-06-18 11:34:31 PM  
The author appears to be complaining that the highest grossing movies are the pablum designed to be sold to the masses, which... Duh. McDonalds hasn't sold billions of dollars by providing the best food an artist can design, carefully prepared to excite your senses.

That doesn't mean there isn't space for the experiments and the artistes. Just don't expect them to be the top of the box office.
 
2022-06-18 11:40:48 PM  
I'm betting Mr. Lynch just fine cashing those checks from same the industry who made him a whole lot of money (presumably). I'm sure it was all from intellectuals, though.
 
2022-06-19 1:05:43 AM  
He's not wrong, but he's no Kubrick.
 
2022-06-19 1:10:50 AM  

Bootleg: The author appears to be complaining that the highest grossing movies are the pablum designed to be sold to the masses, which... Duh. McDonalds hasn't sold billions of dollars by providing the best food an artist can design, carefully prepared to excite your senses.

That doesn't mean there isn't space for the experiments and the artistes. Just don't expect them to be the top of the box office.


Or at the box office at all.  Which is kind of the problem.

There are strikingly few original property films that get anywhere near a full theater release anymore.  It's all sequels, reboots, comic books and Star Wars.  Streaming is picking up the comedies and the weird stuff but something like Blue Velvet, which made $8.6M in 1986 (around $30M in 2022 dollars), would never see a theater now.
 
2022-06-19 1:17:35 AM  
It's kids who are wrong...
 
2022-06-19 1:25:48 AM  
Someone's peeved that he turned down Return of the Jedi for the dreadful Dune.
 
2022-06-19 3:19:36 AM  

OptionC: Bootleg: The author appears to be complaining that the highest grossing movies are the pablum designed to be sold to the masses, which... Duh. McDonalds hasn't sold billions of dollars by providing the best food an artist can design, carefully prepared to excite your senses.

That doesn't mean there isn't space for the experiments and the artistes. Just don't expect them to be the top of the box office.

Or at the box office at all.  Which is kind of the problem.

There are strikingly few original property films that get anywhere near a full theater release anymore.  It's all sequels, reboots, comic books and Star Wars.  Streaming is picking up the comedies and the weird stuff but something like Blue Velvet, which made $8.6M in 1986 (around $30M in 2022 dollars), would never see a theater now.


According to fark, none of this matters and it's all sour grapes for the guy participating in society.

Id go to the movie theater if there were movies like Blue Velvet getting made today. But people seem to be fine with rehashing the same shiat stories and characters over and over.
 
2022-06-19 3:19:58 AM  
I agree with him.
 
2022-06-19 3:26:25 AM  

FarkingChas: I agree with him.


Would you like us to get off your lawn as well?
 
2022-06-19 3:27:45 AM  
The way movies are consumed has changed and pretty much eliminated the $10-$30 million dollar movie in theaters.  Before streaming services the movies in that price range could survive on DVD sales even if they didn't catch on in theaters, if they were cult hits or targeted a large enough niche.  Comedies are hit especially hard, few studios are putting any comedic movies out in wide release anymore, they just don't make money.
 
2022-06-19 3:39:37 AM  

FarkingChas: I agree with him.


Absolutely.
If you grew up in the 70s, you probably do as well. Action dreck is fine, I like it now and then, but the point he's making is that there is NO room for anything else.
 
2022-06-19 3:42:09 AM  

Truthman: FarkingChas: I agree with him.

Absolutely.
If you grew up in the 70s, you probably do as well. Action dreck is fine, I like it now and then, but the point he's making is that there is NO room for anything else.


The French Connection won best picture that decade.

#wannatalkaboutittextmeok
 
2022-06-19 3:46:54 AM  
I want to live in the timeline where he didn't turn down Return Of The Jedi and then make Dune.
 
2022-06-19 3:52:57 AM  
Back when people had few entertainment choices, they would pay to watch a movie based on a modern novel that featured people standing around and talking about stuff in a mid-Atlantic accent and it would be a great evening. Like TV before cable, you had limited choices. It's not that it was bad entertainment, but when you can choose to watch a film featuring beautiful people doing doing amazing things and getting into improbable adventures, a lot of us are going to choose to do that.

What are the old movies that people who weren't even born back then know about today? The Wizard of Oz, and Gone with the Wind, and Snow White, and Clint Eastwood westerns--not Mildred Pierce or The Third Man or The Philadelphia Story. The former are great movies, but they are also highly entertaining escapist fantasy, and that's what people remember the most.

Also, it's not like there wasn't a lot of dreck during the Golden Age.  Just no one remembers it except the die-hard film buffs.
 
2022-06-19 4:00:19 AM  
Movies are a story. They take tiiiimmmeee to tell.
The whole theater experience isnt a picnic, it's being able to generally share a community moment with actual folks from your neighborhood.

Last lol comedy I saw was in the theater, maybe half full,
Mrsprof me, everyone in the theater, rolling lol, at due date with rdj and galifinakkiss(sp).
Rolling, laughing, the beard the dog, like high 5s in the aisle, was such a deperature. That was 2010 about lol, fark. But it was worth getting on DVD.

Theres comedy out there, but its niche, and I embrace that. Lynch is saying that. Not a year goes by I dont see an eraserhead shirt...damn belt onion.
Anyway, I miss tracking on the vcr....woe is me.
I'm a mst3k kid, so I welcome our millennial overlords to make comedy funny again.

/Anyone that says they read infinite jest is a liar.
 
2022-06-19 4:03:08 AM  

Truthman: FarkingChas: I agree with him.

Absolutely.
If you grew up in the 70s, you probably do as well. Action dreck is fine, I like it now and then, but the point he's making is that there is NO room for anything else.


No, its that the past few years have shown everyone that the long complicated stories we really want are better suited for streaming services, and they usually do a better job telling those stories than any hollywood producer could. Think about it: the mandalorian could have been done as a single movie, and would have done well, but it was infinitely better as a show.

The movies out now are either interconnected drek where you feel you wont understand anything unless you have watched 20 other movies before that one, or things that dont have much of a story to tell but have a lot of fun visuals to enjoy in the short time they have. The only "problem" with the system is that a bunch of old bastards are the ones who whine that things are not the way they were 30 years ago and for some reason they just cant explain at all its bad.

The times have changed and the landscape has evolved. Hollywood has lost its monopoly on visual entertainment and is trying everything short of what would work to get the money back that its lost. We dont use movies for any sort of thinking fun anymore, they are mindless fun. All the thinking fun has moved to streaming series, because we all know we can get a far more satisfying experience that way
 
2022-06-19 4:06:53 AM  
The movies I see nowadays aren't that different than what I saw in theaters back in the 80's.

But in the 80's, there was a lot of middling to crap movies that I did see on cable after they left theaters.  I have neither the time nor the inclination to do that anymore.
 
2022-06-19 4:16:49 AM  
Well, he's not wrong.
 
2022-06-19 4:21:16 AM  
Awww.....who's a bitter little has-been? Who's a bitter little has-been? It's you ain't it? Yes, it's you. You the bitter little has-been!
 
2022-06-19 4:21:34 AM  

cepson: Back when people had few entertainment choices, they would pay to watch a movie based on a modern novel that featured people standing around and talking about stuff in a mid-Atlantic accent and it would be a great evening. Like TV before cable, you had limited choices. It's not that it was bad entertainment, but when you can choose to watch a film featuring beautiful people doing doing amazing things and getting into improbable adventures, a lot of us are going to choose to do that.

What are the old movies that people who weren't even born back then know about today? The Wizard of Oz, and Gone with the Wind, and Snow White, and Clint Eastwood westerns--not Mildred Pierce or The Third Man or The Philadelphia Story. The former are great movies, but they are also highly entertaining escapist fantasy, and that's what people remember the most.

Also, it's not like there wasn't a lot of dreck during the Golden Age.  Just no one remembers it except the die-hard film buffs.


There is dreck everywhere.
Watch the Top movies of a dead era, 87-90, before pretty woman, which is a remake of my fair lady, and that genre isnt good.
But for the dreck it is, yes. 2nd best movie ever came out then, crocodile dundee 2.
<Serious, argue me.>
It has everything movie escapism is. No expectations going in and left with everything a movie should be.
Rewatching worthy.


Mary pickford was a great actress and charles Chaplin, buster keaton..
(Hipster bonafidos are showing.).

Enjoy everything and screw lost highway.
Anybody?
 
2022-06-19 4:22:46 AM  

cepson: Back when people had few entertainment choices, they would pay to watch a movie based on a modern novel that featured people standing around and talking about stuff in a mid-Atlantic accent and it would be a great evening. Like TV before cable, you had limited choices. It's not that it was bad entertainment, but when you can choose to watch a film featuring beautiful people doing doing amazing things and getting into improbable adventures, a lot of us are going to choose to do that.

What are the old movies that people who weren't even born back then know about today? The Wizard of Oz, and Gone with the Wind, and Snow White, and Clint Eastwood westerns--not Mildred Pierce or The Third Man or The Philadelphia Story. The former are great movies, but they are also highly entertaining escapist fantasy, and that's what people remember the most.

Also, it's not like there wasn't a lot of dreck during the Golden Age.  Just no one remembers it except the die-hard film buffs.


You remember.
Maybe not watch, but you know cinema-art- doesn't manifest itself.
Thx
 
2022-06-19 4:25:50 AM  

Concrete Donkey: Truthman: FarkingChas: I agree with him.

Absolutely.
If you grew up in the 70s, you probably do as well. Action dreck is fine, I like it now and then, but the point he's making is that there is NO room for anything else.

No, its that the past few years have shown everyone that the long complicated stories we really want are better suited for streaming services, and they usually do a better job telling those stories than any hollywood producer could. Think about it: the mandalorian could have been done as a single movie, and would have done well, but it was infinitely better as a show.

The movies out now are either interconnected drek where you feel you wont understand anything unless you have watched 20 other movies before that one, or things that dont have much of a story to tell but have a lot of fun visuals to enjoy in the short time they have. The only "problem" with the system is that a bunch of old bastards are the ones who whine that things are not the way they were 30 years ago and for some reason they just cant explain at all its bad.

The times have changed and the landscape has evolved. Hollywood has lost its monopoly on visual entertainment and is trying everything short of what would work to get the money back that its lost. We dont use movies for any sort of thinking fun anymore, they are mindless fun. All the thinking fun has moved to streaming series, because we all know we can get a far more satisfying experience that way


Who are we?
Bollywood.

Go....
I'll wait.
 
2022-06-19 4:28:06 AM  

Alphax: But in the 80's, there was a lot of middling to crap movies that I did see on cable after they left theaters.


I think what is missing today are John Badham movies.

John Badham is my go-to reference point for well-made, decent movies that just entertain you for 2 hours and that's it. His movies were neither expensive to film nor required extensive VFX but they had their share of A-list casts, they weren't auteur arthouse pieces nor were they Oscar bait, they didn't break box office records but they never did poorly, they contained very little sex/violence/language so they were family friendly, but they were solid movies and if you ever caught one on cable on a lazy Sunday afternoon, you'd probably plop down a watch it.

John Badham is still working today, but he had a string of memorable films in the 80s and 90s that most other filmmakers would be envious of: Short Circuit, War Games, American Flyers, Stakeout, Bird on a Wire, Blue Thunder, Point of No Return, The Hard Way.

It's not that there's no one like that making movies today, it's that there are no movies like that today, period. At least not in theatres.
 
2022-06-19 5:03:58 AM  

AAAAGGGGHHHH: Awww.....who's a bitter little has-been? Who's a bitter little has-been? It's you ain't it? Yes, it's you. You the bitter little has-been!


I'm pretty sure David Lynch has never been more popular than now.  They're re releasing Lost Highway in theaters for God's sake!
 
2022-06-19 5:08:49 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-06-19 5:23:20 AM  
Fast Show - French Art House Film
Youtube o4EjX_bywCU
 
2022-06-19 5:27:08 AM  
Because the Francis the Talking Mule films were lost and forgotten High Art?
 
2022-06-19 5:30:57 AM  
 
2022-06-19 5:48:15 AM  
I read that in his voice.
 
2022-06-19 5:57:47 AM  

batlock666: I read that in his voice.


I always get him confused with the guy from the B52s so I read it in his voice.
 
2022-06-19 6:07:09 AM  
The film industry has always had to compete for audiences. In the beginning there were only theatre and magic lantern shows. Cinema had the monopoly on moving images. Radio brought entertainment into the home, but audio only. Films shifted from silent to sound to compete.

The first significant threat to film's dominance was television. Moving pictures and sound free of admission in the comfort of your own home. Hollywood responded with widescreen, vivid colour and epics.

The next big threat came from home video and satellite TV, even though both were also a source of revenue. Star Wars had shown the way to deal with that. More action, more spectacle, more special effects, surround sound.

In this century television and streaming video presented the most significant competition yet. Thousands of choices on a big colour screen at home, 24/7. So far they've been using familiarity to draw the punters in. Sequels, prequels, remakes and adaptations from comic books all have large existing audiences. By giving people things they already know and enjoy, they create movies that stand out to people who are overwhelmed by the sheer volume of choices on offer elsewhere.
 
2022-06-19 6:10:42 AM  
It used to be a huge part of the movie budget was the film. The stuff was expensive. Then there was processing, and a tedious editing system that involved hand splicing by experts. And when all that was done, you had to print the film to reach every theater you wanted to be in. Then each theater had to be run by a projectionist, who had to repair breaks and maybe steal a memento here and there. Then after the domestic showings, maybe a few prints go international. Mostly they're just burned for their silver content, which never shows up back on the balance sheet.

Now it's all digital, with a global marketplace to access in a dozen manners. And there's more money for niche than ever. You don't have to smuggle heroin to buy the film for your art movie anymore.
 
2022-06-19 7:13:50 AM  

LewDux: [Fark user image 500x706]


That....and Scooby Doo and the Pirate Zombie Jungle Island...

/Saw him live for the first time a couple of months ago...funniest bloke on the planet.
 
2022-06-19 7:21:44 AM  
David, I love you, but no one is going to sit for three hours in a theater for 'Inland Empire'.  The landscape has changed and theaters have tons of competition from streaming services and the effects of the pandemic.

I would challenge him if he wanted to make a movie to make something both commercial and artistic.  Like he used to do.  He's gone down the rabbit hole of alternate lives again and again; Lost Highway, Mulholland Drive, IE.
I would argue he's in a rut and I LOVE DL.
 
2022-06-19 7:23:12 AM  

North_Central_Positronics: I'm betting Mr. Lynch just fine cashing those checks from same the industry who made him a whole lot of money (presumably).


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-06-19 7:29:03 AM  

OptionC: Bootleg: The author appears to be complaining that the highest grossing movies are the pablum designed to be sold to the masses, which... Duh. McDonalds hasn't sold billions of dollars by providing the best food an artist can design, carefully prepared to excite your senses.

That doesn't mean there isn't space for the experiments and the artistes. Just don't expect them to be the top of the box office.

Or at the box office at all.  Which is kind of the problem.

There are strikingly few original property films that get anywhere near a full theater release anymore.  It's all sequels, reboots, comic books and Star Wars.  Streaming is picking up the comedies and the weird stuff but something like Blue Velvet, which made $8.6M in 1986 (around $30M in 2022 dollars), would never see a theater now.


Would Blue Velvet see a wide theater release; no. Would it get produced in some form for a streaming service; yes.
 
2022-06-19 7:29:31 AM  
"Rapist humanist intellectuals"
 
2022-06-19 7:39:37 AM  

Ishkur: Alphax: But in the 80's, there was a lot of middling to crap movies that I did see on cable after they left theaters.

I think what is missing today are John Badham movies.

John Badham is my go-to reference point for well-made, decent movies that just entertain you for 2 hours and that's it. His movies were neither expensive to film nor required extensive VFX but they had their share of A-list casts, they weren't auteur arthouse pieces nor were they Oscar bait, they didn't break box office records but they never did poorly, they contained very little sex/violence/language so they were family friendly, but they were solid movies and if you ever caught one on cable on a lazy Sunday afternoon, you'd probably plop down a watch it.

John Badham is still working today, but he had a string of memorable films in the 80s and 90s that most other filmmakers would be envious of: Short Circuit, War Games, American Flyers, Stakeout, Bird on a Wire, Blue Thunder, Point of No Return, The Hard Way.

It's not that there's no like that making movies today, it's that there are no movies like that today, period. At least not in theatres.


I can't remember the last time  "American Flyers" was mentioned anywhere.  It used to play constantly on movie channels, back in the day.  It stars a young Kevin Costner.
 
2022-06-19 7:42:08 AM  

Deja vu all over again: OptionC: Bootleg: The author appears to be complaining that the highest grossing movies are the pablum designed to be sold to the masses, which... Duh. McDonalds hasn't sold billions of dollars by providing the best food an artist can design, carefully prepared to excite your senses.

That doesn't mean there isn't space for the experiments and the artistes. Just don't expect them to be the top of the box office.

Or at the box office at all.  Which is kind of the problem.

There are strikingly few original property films that get anywhere near a full theater release anymore.  It's all sequels, reboots, comic books and Star Wars.  Streaming is picking up the comedies and the weird stuff but something like Blue Velvet, which made $8.6M in 1986 (around $30M in 2022 dollars), would never see a theater now.

Would Blue Velvet see a wide theater release; no. Would it get produced in some form for a streaming service; yes.


I would see it, yes.  But I am a big DL fan and it would make hundreds of dollars at the box office. I would argue that his greatest cultural impact is from the 'lowly' medium of TV with Twin Peaks.  Hell, Showtime is begging for another season of TP IIRC.
 
2022-06-19 7:47:45 AM  

Tannhauser: Deja vu all over again: OptionC: Bootleg: The author appears to be complaining that the highest grossing movies are the pablum designed to be sold to the masses, which... Duh. McDonalds hasn't sold billions of dollars by providing the best food an artist can design, carefully prepared to excite your senses.

That doesn't mean there isn't space for the experiments and the artistes. Just don't expect them to be the top of the box office.

Or at the box office at all.  Which is kind of the problem.

There are strikingly few original property films that get anywhere near a full theater release anymore.  It's all sequels, reboots, comic books and Star Wars.  Streaming is picking up the comedies and the weird stuff but something like Blue Velvet, which made $8.6M in 1986 (around $30M in 2022 dollars), would never see a theater now.

Would Blue Velvet see a wide theater release; no. Would it get produced in some form for a streaming service; yes.

I would see it, yes.  But I am a big DL fan and it would make hundreds of dollars at the box office. I would argue that his greatest cultural impact is from the 'lowly' medium of TV with Twin Peaks.  Hell, Showtime is begging for another season of TP IIRC.


I'd watch another season of Twin Peaks but there is literally no place for the story to go.  The citizens of Twin Peaks don't even know who Laura Palmer is anymore.
 
2022-06-19 7:58:09 AM  
I agree with him on one hand since I had to sit thru a few depressing ass nihilistic classic Jack Nicholson
films growing up.

And on the other hand, I don't care. I watch films to escape, not to be educated or to be shown a mirror
of a dreary existence or watch some artsy fartsy ass auteur working through his own neurosis.

I googled the highest grossing and most popular films around the time of my birth, and surprise,
it always has been the same more or less. A few accidental classics, a few that may have elevated the artform, but, the rest are a mixture of mindless spectacle and westerns.

/Also it reminds me of people lauding Hitchcock as some master, when during his actual tenure,
people were calling his stuff middlebrow.
//I guess he's mad cuz he can't have something financed.
 
2022-06-19 8:08:53 AM  

resident dystopian: I watch films to escape, not to be educated or to be shown a mirror
of a dreary existence or watch some artsy fartsy ass auteur working through his own neurosis.


Way to shut out most of NPR's movie recommendations.

/I like science fiction, fantasy, action, and comedy
//I want to laugh out loud and look at blinky lights
///movies were my first lesson in not caring what the 'refined' think
 
2022-06-19 8:15:03 AM  
if i had infinite time and money i would set up a huge tv with large speakers in front of this guys house to play that grandpa simpson clip about how 'i used to be with it but then they changed what it was...' on loop at high volume for several hours a day.


/dont know if hes wrong or not
//have only seen star wars, lord of the rings, maybe some harry potter in theaters this century
///streaming often does not entirely satisfy the promise of long-form storytelling
 
2022-06-19 8:20:30 AM  

Zik-Zak: resident dystopian: I watch films to escape, not to be educated or to be shown a mirror
of a dreary existence or watch some artsy fartsy ass auteur working through his own neurosis.

Way to shut out most of NPR's movie recommendations.

/I like science fiction, fantasy, action, and comedy
//I want to laugh out loud and look at blinky lights
///movies were my first lesson in not caring what the 'refined' think


I'm pretty sure your attitude extends to hygiene and clothing too.
 
2022-06-19 8:28:27 AM  
I've been going to a local arthouse theatre lately, and by God all of the "intellectual" movies are some of the dumbest things I've ever seen.

I think filmmaking in general is suffering. I think people who tell stories just don't know how to tell stories. I've no idea how or why, but by God it's depressing when you have Marvel over here, and morose nonsense that sounds like an edgy teen wrote it.

Anyway, don't waste your money on "Neptune Frost" is what I'm saying.
 
2022-06-19 8:35:30 AM  

Tanqueray: He's not wrong, but he's no Kubrick.


Yeah, he's actually nice to his actors, so they come back and perform in other of his movies.
 
2022-06-19 8:49:47 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-06-19 8:50:34 AM  

optikeye: Zik-Zak: resident dystopian: I watch films to escape, not to be educated or to be shown a mirror
of a dreary existence or watch some artsy fartsy ass auteur working through his own neurosis.

Way to shut out most of NPR's movie recommendations.

/I like science fiction, fantasy, action, and comedy
//I want to laugh out loud and look at blinky lights
///movies were my first lesson in not caring what the 'refined' think

I'm pretty sure your attitude extends to hygiene and clothing too.


It did, actually. T-shirt and jeans are OK if I'm not doing anything 'formal,' and bathing at least once a day, every day, is great as long as I don't take too long and waste water.
 
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