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(Phys Org2)   26 orogenies   (phys.org) divider line
    More: Giggity, Plate tectonics, New models, use of our services, email address, new geological models, history of the Earth, Earth, plate model  
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1208 clicks; posted to STEM » on 08 Jun 2022 at 11:26 AM (15 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



16 Comments     (+0 »)
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2022-06-08 11:16:35 AM  
26 orogenies in a one night stand
i.ytimg.comView Full Size
 
2022-06-08 11:42:14 AM  
Subduction leads to orogeny.
 
2022-06-08 11:58:08 AM  
Can a plate tectonics/geology nerd answer a question for me?

So Australia seems to be sitting smack dab in the middle of it's own plate. But Australia also has some pretty mountainous terrain - so is the Australian plate a conglomeration of older plates fused together or what did the mountain building there? - too busy at work to go fall into a wiki hole lol
 
2022-06-08 12:10:58 PM  

neongoats: Can a plate tectonics/geology nerd answer a question for me?

So Australia seems to be sitting smack dab in the middle of it's own plate. But Australia also has some pretty mountainous terrain - so is the Australian plate a conglomeration of older plates fused together or what did the mountain building there? - too busy at work to go fall into a wiki hole lol


Looks like a good summary: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geology_of_Australia

upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size


Also, keep in mind that once a plate is big enough to tend to survive some collisions, sometimes another plate will subduct and tend to trigger some volcanoes through the edge of the plate. This both adds vertical rock to the plate and can widen the plate (in addition to exotic terranes which get scraped on to the edges). So at present Australia is sitting in the middle of its plate, but things used to be more complicated.
 
2022-06-08 12:11:01 PM  

neongoats: Can a plate tectonics/geology nerd answer a question for me?

So Australia seems to be sitting smack dab in the middle of it's own plate. But Australia also has some pretty mountainous terrain - so is the Australian plate a conglomeration of older plates fused together or what did the mountain building there? - too busy at work to go fall into a wiki hole lol


Magma
 
2022-06-08 12:16:16 PM  

neongoats: Can a plate tectonics/geology nerd answer a question for me?

So Australia seems to be sitting smack dab in the middle of it's own plate. But Australia also has some pretty mountainous terrain - so is the Australian plate a conglomeration of older plates fused together or what did the mountain building there? - too busy at work to go fall into a wiki hole lol



Back in the Carboniferous period when it was still attached Antarctica it collided with a smaller plate that would later become the micro-continent of Zealandia
 
2022-06-08 12:20:18 PM  
Word.

Thanks guys.
 
2022-06-08 12:29:03 PM  
imgs.xkcd.comView Full Size
 
2022-06-08 12:45:15 PM  
Flood Basalts of the Pacific Northwest
Youtube VQhjkemEyUo
 
2022-06-08 12:54:35 PM  
I went to school with 27 orogenies.
 
2022-06-08 1:45:29 PM  
And they still can't throw a boomerang.
 
2022-06-08 1:52:28 PM  
So....how does humanity draining aquifers impact earthquake chance and severity in places like say........cascadia?
 
2022-06-08 2:14:04 PM  

Concrete Donkey: So....how does humanity draining aquifers impact earthquake chance and severity in places like say........cascadia?


Draining aquifers (and oil fields) can cause small, shallow quakes, but subduction zones are orders of magnitude deeper and so the effect on those would be minimal.
 
2022-06-08 4:30:10 PM  

dennysgod: [imgs.xkcd.com image 697x264]


i.imgflip.comView Full Size
 
2022-06-08 8:45:21 PM  

common sense is an oxymoron: Concrete Donkey: So....how does humanity draining aquifers impact earthquake chance and severity in places like say........cascadia?

Draining aquifers (and oil fields) can cause small, shallow quakes, but subduction zones are orders of magnitude deeper and so the effect on those would be minimal.


Concrete Donkey chose a poor location to wonder about such a minor force as surface water, considering there are things going on there such as the western side of Cascadia rotating clockwise since the time that the Yellowstone hot spot passed through and the area was covered with huge layers of chocolate cake... in addition to the coastal fault activities.
 
2022-06-09 11:05:30 AM  
loved this one. structure function and dynamics... next thing ya know, geology rock will have smash hits...
 
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