Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Laughing Squid)   How much trash do you generate in a month? And how would you wear it?   (laughingsquid.com) divider line
    More: Giggity, Recycling, Environmental activist Rob Greenfield, average US American, positive change, self-reflection, strong visual, amount of individual trash, daily basis  
•       •       •

543 clicks; posted to Business » on 27 May 2022 at 11:12 PM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



19 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-05-27 11:50:24 PM  
I saw this as a performance art piece years ago by someone else.
 
2022-05-27 11:58:28 PM  
How much trash do you generate in a month?

Hang on...I need to check my posting history.
 
2022-05-28 12:11:05 AM  

CFitzsimmons: I saw this as a performance art piece years ago by someone else.


It rang a bell for me, too. Some part of the article or a sidebar piece mentioned he did the same performance piece in NYC on 2016. Might be it?
 
2022-05-28 12:31:45 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-05-28 1:07:01 AM  
This sort of thing is actually pretty interesting.  For example, my family of 4 puts out a half filled black garbage bag every trash day along with a small recycling bin.  My neighbors (some of which don't even have kids) put out overflowing totes 8-10x the volume along with an overflowing double volume recycling bin.  I really can't understand how they consume so much shiat.

/composting saves a ton of volume and keeps the garbage from smelling
//In the winter I can store things in the cold garage and get away with 1 black bag every 2 weeks
 
2022-05-28 1:44:02 AM  
Ha. This is a good one. We compost AND we recycle everything we are allowed to recycle because.... we have to pay for every bag of trash we throw away.

Composting takes away everything wet, massive, and stinky. Take away all the plastic packaging, wrapping, bottle caps, etc. and you bring the volume way way down. Then recycle cardboard boxes, milk cartons, paper and printed matter. Take away all the PET bottles, glass, steel, metal and aluminum and you are left with.....

not a lot. In a month, it comes down to half an American sized garbage bag. It would be about 6 to 8 plastic shopping bags worth of... what.... vacuum cleaner bag stuff, some half paper/half plastic hybrid packaging, really gooped up plastic and other packaging, kind of random stuff, I guess. Small paper packs?

Very similarly to the poster above me, I marvel at how my American relatives just chunk it all in a bin and it is just huge amounts of .... everything. My theory is that they must overbuy and waste. People don't cook. Mainly?

The recycled stuff gets recycled. The dirty secret is that the plastic is also burned. It is incinerated at very high temperatures, so that no PCBs are produced.

My garbage suit would not be so bad. 10 kg per month, probably.
 
2022-05-28 1:53:44 AM  
There is a future where costs of packaging keep falling, and, with recycling, we can use packaging over and over. I think humans can figure that out. The problem is having enough energy to do that.

I am not sure how it works, but there might eventually be pressure and factors such that the product is cheaper than the packaging. So more efficient packaging will have to be found just to compete.

We shall see. Lately, I have been thinking about how high prices can make things better. Particularly, they get people to take a second look at waste, which is a really good thing. It also entails no value judgments, which makes some policy decisions easier. Put simply, if you want to waste, you have to pay. Consumption and waste is everyone' s burden. Let people find their own ways to solve their problems. Don't coddle them. Etc.
 
2022-05-28 2:22:17 AM  
I'm pretty good about buying food in mostly recyclable packaging, cardboard boxes being a bulk. A little thin film plastic.

I have an idea about recyclable or compostable solution to some types. We might need a ounce tare on some scales for paper bags in produce.
 
2022-05-28 4:24:16 AM  
I have a trash compactor in the kitchen so I don't generate much footprint wise.
 
2022-05-28 8:31:09 AM  
I have cats, I'm not going to walk around with cat litter
 
2022-05-28 9:16:14 AM  

RogermcAllen: This sort of thing is actually pretty interesting.  For example, my family of 4 puts out a half filled black garbage bag every trash day along with a small recycling bin.  My neighbors (some of which don't even have kids) put out overflowing totes 8-10x the volume along with an overflowing double volume recycling bin.  I really can't understand how they consume so much shiat.

/composting saves a ton of volume and keeps the garbage from smelling
//In the winter I can store things in the cold garage and get away with 1 black bag every 2 weeks


You must live two houses down from me, as my neighbor is the same way. Every week their 96-gallon bin can't even be closed because the black garbage bags are stuffed so high. The recycle bin barely makes an appearance.

/maybe fills a 13-gallon bag a week
//tries to recycle but feels guilty when the bin is full because consumerism
 
2022-05-28 10:52:26 AM  
Approves..

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-05-28 11:18:29 AM  

RogermcAllen: This sort of thing is actually pretty interesting.  For example, my family of 4 puts out a half filled black garbage bag every trash day along with a small recycling bin.  My neighbors (some of which don't even have kids) put out overflowing totes 8-10x the volume along with an overflowing double volume recycling bin.  I really can't understand how they consume so much shiat.

/composting saves a ton of volume and keeps the garbage from smelling
//In the winter I can store things in the cold garage and get away with 1 black bag every 2 weeks


To fill in why they're garbage spewing fiends...

First I'm going to bet (given your composting reference) that:

1)  You prepare most of your meals, and by prepare I mean peel, cut, cook and season raw food and make something yourself.  Your neighbors take boxes out of the freezer and nuke it.  Or take a few small steps and turn a nearly prepared dish that comes in a box or can combines that with some piece of meat.

2) You wash cutlery and dinnerware.  Your neighbors throw out their paper/plastic plates and utensils every meal.  BTW, my wife was amazed when I showed her that purchasing $200/place setting fine china (2010 prices) was actually less expensive than using paper plates over 10 years.  For further reference, look up the Vimes theory of boots.  Obviously less expensive durable dinnerware lowers your cost of entry, but I like my Wedgewood.

3) You have a water filter, and you use reusable plastic, glass or steel cups to drink water to quench your thirst and get 8-14 cups of water per day.  Your neighbors drink stuff they get in plastic bottles or boxes, and do so in single use cups that they throw out after each use, or at most might "refill" from the soda bottle once or twice before discarding.  Right now due to some appliance delivery screwups we're going through bottled water and I feel like I'm drinking my money.  Tap water is OK, but we've gotten way too used to filtered water via the refrigerator, and due to having a water dispensing fridge forever... didn't have a backup on hand.  If I don't have the replacement appliance by the end of next week though an under-sink filter is being installed and we're stopping the bleeding.

Just those three areas will take you from the 8-10 gallons of trash (assuming those black bags your reference are the 30 gallon size) you reference in your post, to easily 45-60 gallons of trash a day.  Just the uncrushed bottles or cans... yikes.
 
2022-05-28 11:27:22 AM  

SafetyThird: I have a trash compactor in the kitchen so I don't generate much footprint wise.


So you make all of your goods and services in your kitchen?
That's not your "footprint."  Add this

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-05-28 12:41:21 PM  
I put out a 13-gallon bag once or twice a week for my family of four. Twice if it's smelly, once if not. They are rarely full. Plus a couple of 25-ish gallon recycling bins, which may or may not end up in a landfill somewhere.

We've been thinking of getting one of those countertop composters, if only for the "chop everything up into tiny pieces" mode, which I'm thinking would make natural composting work easier and faster.
 
2022-05-28 1:22:32 PM  
"Environmental activist Rob Greenfield embarked to make a powerful statement"
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-05-28 2:45:47 PM  
We throw away about 2lbs of various plastic packaging a month. Everything else is composted or put in the recycle bin. Technically we're supposed to bag all our light plastics and put them in the recycle bin too but we don't.
SF has a goal of 100% waste diversion but what we reduce is probably offset by the amount of garbage the homeless people around here create.
 
2022-05-29 11:34:23 AM  

Trainspotr: I put out a 13-gallon bag once or twice a week for my family of four. Twice if it's smelly, once if not. They are rarely full. Plus a couple of 25-ish gallon recycling bins, which may or may not end up in a landfill somewhere.

We've been thinking of getting one of those countertop composters, if only for the "chop everything up into tiny pieces" mode, which I'm thinking would make natural composting work easier and faster.


Look into worm composting.  Doesn't smell if done correctly, which means it can be done inside.  It can easily be scaled up or down to different container sizes based on the size of your space and amount of kitchen scraps. I  have large totes that move inside in the winter, but know somebody who keeps a smaller tote under their kitchen sink year round.  It produces enough compost for a small garden, but you could also just toss it (and any extra worms) in the yard if the primary goal is to divert food scraps from the trash can.
 
2022-05-29 11:36:22 AM  

wax_on: We throw away about 2lbs of various plastic packaging a month. Everything else is composted or put in the recycle bin. Technically we're supposed to bag all our light plastics and put them in the recycle bin too but we don't.
SF has a goal of 100% waste diversion but what we reduce is probably offset by the amount of garbage the homeless people around here create.


I recently realized the plastic bag drop off bins at our grocery store also accept any other thin, flexible plastic packaging, including bubble wrap.
 
Displayed 19 of 19 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.