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(Fark Fiction Anthology)   'Everyone is a potential murderer. In everyone there arises from time to time the wish to kill, though not the will to kill.' - Agatha Christie, Curtain. This is your Fark Writer's Thread, Plotting Murder Edition   (farkfiction.net) divider line
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667 clicks; posted to Main » and Discussion » on 25 May 2022 at 3:15 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-05-25 2:29:02 PM  
Dame Agatha Christie is one of the best-selling novelists of all time. Her books have sold *puts pinky to corner of mouth* two billion copies in English. She's been called the "Duchess of Death," the "Mistress of Mystery," and the "Queen of Crime" which are all more badass nicknames than any I've been given. ("That weird guy with the cats" isn't exactly badass, sadly.)  He style appears to be formulaic now, but while she didn't invent the formula of the detective story-show something that seems impossible, and then show how it could have been done, and why it was-but she refined it with her detectives Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple. While some reports suggest that she eventually grew so tired of Poirot that she planned his death, she never followed through, unlike Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Sherlock Holmes.

During both World Wars, she served in hospital dispensaries, where she learned about the poisons she used in many of her stories. Which is probably a more useful skillset than any I've come across, since I'd be hard pressed to come up with a good murder plot based on a computer game.

This article has seven plotting tips from Agatha Christie:

Start plotting. Beginning a story is one of the most difficult parts of writing.
Let your plot develop. Agatha Christie found her ideas by letting her mind run wild while she was busy doing other things.
Use your interests. The best writer is diverse in what they study.
Plot your character's flaws. Writers should develop background, flaws, sharp edges, and history for their characters.
Plot characters and their potential. Agatha Christie never denied the potential darkness of being a mystery fiction writer. Instead, she embraced it by using the psychology of human potential throughout her work.
Cause and effect drives the plot. Two of the most important questions for a fiction writer are 'What if?' and 'What happens next?'
Collaborative plots aren't for everyone. If you have to share the royalties, well, that might just be a cause for a knife in the back . . .

Fark Fiction Anthology Update!

We are open for submissions for the 2022 Fark Fiction Anthology!


We're looking for short, less than 10,000 word fiction submissions in the following genres:

Fantasy!
Science Fiction!
Humor!
Horror!
Suspense/mystery/thriller!


(And if you have a great story that doesn't fit into any of those, send it in any way! We'll find a way to make it work!)

Submissions will be open until July 31st, so get them in to us!

The 2022 Fark Fiction Anthology Submissions Page

We are also still looking for good title suggestions for this year's anthology. Have a good idea? Let us know in this thread!
 
2022-05-25 3:04:51 PM  
The happy people are failures because they are on such good terms with themselves they don't give a damn.

--
One of my favourite Agatha Christie quotes.

"Never do anything yourself that others can do for you."

― Agatha Christie, The Labours of Hercules

The word laziness has 10,000 meanings, all of them wrong and misapplied to other people. -- Me

Beat that, you old biddy.
 
2022-05-25 3:05:17 PM  
Laziness is not doing something somebody wants you to do for them.
 
2022-05-25 3:23:46 PM  
I submitted my story Twist of DNA to the Fark anthology, as requested last week.  Did you get it?

Submitted another story to another open call anthology.

Waiting on my novel to come back from my editor so I can drop it in InDesign and send to Amazon. It's the follow-up (2nd in the series) to the one that came out last fall.

Researching a stand-alone horror novel that will involve MLMs and cults.

Thinking about designing a story-telling card deck set in my time-traveling lizard world.

Any writers in the CT area?  We have this event coming up June 25. There might be a couple of spaces still open, or just stop by and meet cool people like me.
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-05-25 3:34:28 PM  
"presumption of innocence"

/ 🪟
 
2022-05-25 3:37:06 PM  
"That weird guy with the cats" isn't exactly badass, sadly. -- Toraque

Well, he's my murderer, anyway. Hope you don't mind. But he's not obsessed with cats. He has another obsession. That's all I can say.

I never cared much for Agatha Christie. I don't know why.
 
2022-05-25 3:38:40 PM  

Spawn_of_Cthulhu: I submitted my story Twist of DNA to the Fark anthology, as requested last week.  Did you get it?

Submitted another story to another open call anthology.

Waiting on my novel to come back from my editor so I can drop it in InDesign and send to Amazon. It's the follow-up (2nd in the series) to the one that came out last fall.

Researching a stand-alone horror novel that will involve MLMs and cults.

Thinking about designing a story-telling card deck set in my time-traveling lizard world.

Any writers in the CT area?  We have this event coming up June 25. There might be a couple of spaces still open, or just stop by and meet cool people like me.[Fark user image 850x1100]


Looks like fun, but the Shallow South is bit far off from Connecticut.

I do have a semi-steampunk story I was working on for a friend who was trying to establish a Steampunk Shooting Society. Be warned- it's a bad attempt to copy Lovecraft's style:

*****
Notes from the Journal of Professor Erasmus Pulver

It has fallen to me to be the Expedition chronicler and cartographer, which tasks I accepted readily- being by inclination and training an historian with special interest in geography. As your humble correspondent, then, I will begin with a portentous meeting on April the 18th, 1886, in the Masters Hall at Miskatonic University in Arkham town.

Dr. Hiram Cairnhill, a forthright and dashing gentleman who had captained a regiment of infantry during the great paroxysm of violence which had lately plagued our nation, had called for a gathering of certain persons from the University for the purpose of discussing the continued absence of Professor Michael Harriman. Professor Harriman, who had the Chair of Archaeology, had departed some three years previous on a University sponsored expedition to search for evidence of a rumored fallen civilization in the boundless forests of the Congo Free State, in central Africa. The good Professor was now more than a year overdue, and the University had received no word from him since a messenger had arrived by fast steamer more than two years past, advising that the Expedition was bound for the confluence of the Congo and the Lulonga rivers. He had written that certain rumors of haunted lands to the east of the Lulonga had drawn his curiosity.

Dr. Cairnhill, though not a member of the University Faculty or staff, was nonetheless a very influential citizen of Arkham and a good friend to Professor Harriman, which status gave him considerable latitude with Professor Leahy- Master of Mathematics and President of Miskatonic University. At Dr. Cairnhill's request, Professor Leahy had assembled members of the faculty whom he deemed had an interest in the subject or might prove useful. So it was that I- merely an Adjunct Professor of ArcanoGeography under Dr. Woodson's Chair of History- was invited to join the august body.

Aside from the principals already mentioned, those present included the Head of the Language Department, Dr. Garapay; Professor Galding, the Adjunct Professor of Physics; Mr. Jeremiah Stone, Dean of Archaeology and protégé of Professor Harriman; Dr. Henry Williams, our esteemed Professor Emeritus and Guest Lecturer in History; and Mr. Ian Melton, a visiting member of the Royal Geographic Society.

Dr. Cairnhill spoke at length of his frustration in gaining useful information from what passed for the authorities in either Belgium or the Congo Free State concerning the fate or whereabouts of Professor Harriman and the Expedition. He had at last grown concerned enough to entreat Professor Leahy for permission to lead another expedition to locate and, hopefully, rescue Professor Harriman's Expedition.

Professor Leahy shook his head solemnly in denial. The University did not have the financial resources to mount another assault on the Dark Continent. Dr. Cairnhill's face clouded over at the news, but he accepted the fact with a short nod in lieu of the emotional outburst he no doubt repressed.

"Not what I wanted to hear, Leahy," he said frankly. "But not unexpected, for all that. Might I have what non-monetary support you feel is appropriate- if I can find a source of funding?

Professor Leahy smiled graciously and agreed. We were fast approaching the end of the scholastic season, and a mission of rescue and research to Africa would provide excellent real world experience for many junior faculty and senior students. Also, I suspect, Professor Leahy was unwilling to refuse Dr. Cairnhill, whose concern for his friend was clearly written upon his face.

"Thank you, Professor," the good Doctor said with a smile. "I shall gather the necessary funds, which I believe can be had before the end of studies in June. I will rely upon you to gather a likely company of men whose skills and education might see good service."

With that, Dr. Cairnhill donned his hat and cloak and bade us good evening. He was as good as his word, and returned to Miskatonic on the 20th of May with funding from the Royal Geographic Society, the Adventurer's Club of Boston, and the Governor of Massachusetts- a special dispensation from the legislature.

From the moment of Dr. Cairnhill's return, I nearly became lost in the frenzied preparations for departure. Dr. Cairnhill and Mr. Melton interviewed dozens of faculty and staff, and more than a hundred students before winnowing the number down to twelve. From the faculty, Professor Galding and I were joined by Mr. Victor Whaley, from the Languages Department. Dr. Cairnhill also chose Mr. Simon Wise, the University carpenter and a former cavalry officer. The students chosen were all husky lads of good character, seniors all, with knowledge and skills of possible use in our quest.

Tom Delacourt was a Texan who had been a student of Professor Harriman's. His short stature had precluded inclusion in Professor Harriman's ill-fated expedition, but his knowledge of Professor Harriman's peculiar sub-specialty of Archaeology was thought to outweigh whatever disadvantage might result from his slight build.

Joachim Reynolds was only an indifferent student, but he was a past master of all manner of boating. Mr. Melton felt certain his skills would be of vital import in the rain forests of central Africa.

Mortimer Jackson, a native of Arkham, had been recommended by Dr. Garapay as the best student of African Languages at Miskatonic. He spoke Swahili and Kikongo, as well as several less esoteric languages, and was keenly interested in ancient scripts. Both Dr. Cairnhill and Mr. Melton were pleased to have him.

Carl Jensen was a towering student from Denmark, who was an excellent archer and fencer. He was said to be just as tough as the Vikings he so closely resembled.

David Smythe was the son of a former Governor of Louisiana. He was a talented artist, and Dr. Cairnhill felt his skills would prove useful for cataloging any interesting discoveries which the expeditions was likely to make. Mr. Melton was not pleased with the choice of young Mr. Smythe, feeling that he was unlikely to bear up well under the pressures of the journey. I confess to sharing this impression, having noted Smythe's tendency toward drink and smoke and other, more dangerous habits, during his tenure at Miskatonic.

John Clarke was nearly passed over. He was quite skilful in his chosen field of Biology, but his studies at Miskatonic had tended less toward a focus on one specialty and more toward a wide variety of subjects. Mr. Melton was keen to have him along, but Dr. Cairnhill was not of like mind. It was only after the few remaining biology students had failed to measure up that Dr. Cairnhill reluctantly agreed to Clarke's inclusion.

With the Expedition members decided upon, Dr, Cairnhill and Mr. Melton embarked upon procuring supplies and other logistical details of the undertaking. We were all issued Winchester repeating rifles and Colt revolvers, and the bulk of May into the early part of June saw the entire Expedition make weekly trips to the quarry northeast of Arkham for target practice. Young Tom Delacourt proved to be a crack shot, easily the best among us.

On the morning of the 13th of June, we gathered in the library for one last meeting before setting off. Dr. Cairnhill and Mr. Melton had elected to sail immediately for England for the purpose of perusing the maps at the Royal Geographic Society before steaming southward to the mouth of the Congo. Mr. Whaley, joined by young Mr. Jackson and John Clarke, would then travel overland to Brazzaville to hire bearers. Mr. Melton had repeatedly warned that the natives south of the Congo River were not particularly trustworthy, so hiring bearers in southern Gabon was warranted. The rest of the Expedition would travel to Leopoldville by train. Once a team of twenty bearers had been secured, Mr. Whaley and his two young charges would hire passage across the river to Leopoldville. Mr. Melton put great store in hiring a guide in Leopoldville. He had a man in mind, but there was no way to be certain this Mr. Calhoun would be available until we arrived.

After a few toasts of farewell, we waved our goodbyes to Miskatonic University and Arkham, and we set sail for Adventure.


Chapter 2

Our voyage to England was largely uneventful. We had hired passage onboard the steamer Swiftsure, and she was true to her name. Professor Galding spent much time discussing the finer points of steam engines with Swiftsure's Chief Engineer, a profoundly competent fellow named McAndrews. I spent most of my time with young Delacourt, going over Professor Harriman's notes and reference books.

As we steamed up the Thames, the Expedition gathered on the foredeck to take a look at London. Boston and New York are large cities. London is a world. Having visited the City several years previous during my travels to the Continent, I was prepared for the sight. My comrades, however, had never before left the United States, and were completely overwhelmed by the sheer magnificence that is Victoria's London.

The first sight of London from the river was the pall of smoke that overlay the city. Many thousands of coal fires and engines produced a dense cloud of ash and steam which could be seen for miles. Several towering buildings loomed out of the clouds as Swiftsure made her final turn along the Thames, taller than every other man-made structure on Earth.

As we drew closer, I donned my spectacles and cautioned the others to follow suit. The amber-colored lenses would help improve the ambient light under the Smoke, and the leather hoods over each lens would help keep the soot and ash from our eyes.

The docks were a chaotic melee of men and machines. Steam-powered tractors drew huge loads to and from the docks on enormous iron wheels, the thumping of their engines competing with the screech of iron on cobblestones and the shouts of stevedores. There were vessels of every size coming and going from the docks that I fully expected a collision. Captain Whitlow did not seem to share my concern, and Swiftsure glided smoothly through the throng without incident, sending several smaller vessels scooting out of harm's way with not a moment to spare.

Once we were safely pier-side, we quickly gathered our baggage and debarked. Dr. Cairnhill and Mr. Melton saw to the unloading of the Expedition's equipment from the cargo hold, after which we followed the steam tractor to a bonded warehouse nearly a mile from Swiftsure.

Mr. Melton took charge as our guide, my experience with London being years past and even then limited to a few of the better-known locations in the City. We walked a short distance to a large thoroughfare which had rails running through the middle. After a brief wait, a small locomotive steamed into view on the rails, pulling three cars with open sides. Mr. Melton motioned us to follow, and stepped boldly into the nearest car. The trolley never stopped, but its speed was only slightly faster than a brisk walk. Once we had all gained a seat or handhold aboard the trolley, Mr. Melton dropped a few coins into the palm of the car's conductor, a massively beribboned gentleman in well-appointed military uniform whose left leg below the knee had been replaced with an articulated limb constructed of steel, wood, and rubber. Dr. Cairnhill and Mr. Melton engaged the gentleman in a discussion of the techniques involved in the construction and maintenance of such appliances.

After a brief journey away from the docks, Mr. Melton led us off the trolley and into the Carlyle Hotel, a modest stone structure whose external appearance belied the relative opulence within. The lobby was guarded by a stout, uniformed gentleman armed with a truncheon and a truly ferocious moustache. Mr. Melton greeted the man warmly as "Sergeant Poole", and introduced us. Sergeant Poole spoke with a nearly unintelligible accent as he greeted us, then allowed us to enter. Mr. Melton passed the man several coins, along with a small bit of paper. Once inside, Mr. Melton explained that Sergeant Poole was an invalided soldier who now worked as a Commissionaire for the hotel. Such men were invaluable to visitors, as they could deliver messages and run other errands.

The lobby was a warm, clean oasis of light after the grime and gloom of the streets, and we all removed our spectacles with relief. Mr. Melton explained that retired or invalided military men were often hired to keep such places clear which otherwise would be overrun by beggars, pickpockets, street urchins and similar undesirables. Dr. Cairnhill quickly arranged lodging for the Expedition, and we were taken to our rooms by the porter after agreeing to meet in the lobby before dinner.
 
2022-05-25 3:39:57 PM  
It was a dark and stormy night ... and suddenly, a shot rang out!

It was murder, most foul.

But who could have committed such an unspeakable act?

It was the butler.  Duh.  It's always the butler.
 
2022-05-25 3:46:29 PM  
You have my sympathies, then. You have not yet learned that in this life you have to be like everyone else - the perfect mediocrity; no better, no worse. Individuality's a monster and it must be strangled in its cradle to make our friends feel confident. You know, I've often thought that the gangster and the artist are the same in the eyes of the masses. They are admired and hero-worshipped, but there is always present the underlying wish to see them destroyed at the peak of their glory.

The Killing, 1956
 
2022-05-25 3:54:34 PM  

toraque: Start plotting. Beginning a story is one of the most difficult parts of writing.


The late horror writer Tom Piccirilli used to host an exercise on Facebook. He'd ask everyone to Weeners paragraph of their WIP, and we'd rate each other's entries. The gist of it was to teach us to write a proper hook. Grab the reader within the first paragraph - preferably by the first line. It was a hard lesson to learn, but I've learned it after much practice. I've cut back on exposition. That exercise helped me a great deal.

Now to write a proper ending...

I'm in a new book - "Dancing In The Shadows: A Tribute To Anne Rice". All proceeds go to Animal Rescue New Orleans. My story is "Dirty Unhappy Things". Ginger Nuts of Horror reviewed the book and my story was singled out! The review said: "The mysterious buildup to the fierce, wild brutality of Trish Wilson's "Dirty, Unhappy Things" is likely going to leave you in a state of shock". I'm delighted! Here's the Amazon link:

https://www.amazon.com/Dancing-Shadows-Tribute-Anne-Rice-ebook/dp/B09YNCL9L4/
 
2022-05-25 3:55:37 PM  

Wenchmaster: Spawn_of_Cthulhu: I submitted my story Twist of DNA to the Fark anthology, as requested last week.  Did you get it?

Submitted another story to another open call anthology.

Waiting on my novel to come back from my editor so I can drop it in InDesign and send to Amazon. It's the follow-up (2nd in the series) to the one that came out last fall.

Researching a stand-alone horror novel that will involve MLMs and cults.

Thinking about designing a story-telling card deck set in my time-traveling lizard world.

Any writers in the CT area?  We have this event coming up June 25. There might be a couple of spaces still open, or just stop by and meet cool people like me.[Fark user image 850x1100]

Looks like fun, but the Shallow South is bit far off from Connecticut.

I do have a semi-steampunk story I was working on for a friend who was trying to establish a Steampunk Shooting Society. Be warned- it's a bad attempt to copy Lovecraft's style:

*****
Notes from the Journal of Professor Erasmus Pulver

{Story}


That was enjoyable.  Let me know if you need a beta reader when it's finished.
 
2022-05-25 3:56:54 PM  

ms_lara_croft: toraque: Start plotting. Beginning a story is one of the most difficult parts of writing.

The late horror writer Tom Piccirilli used to host an exercise on Facebook. He'd ask everyone to Weeners paragraph of their WIP, and we'd rate each other's entries. The gist of it was to teach us to write a proper hook. Grab the reader within the first paragraph - preferably by the first line. It was a hard lesson to learn, but I've learned it after much practice. I've cut back on exposition. That exercise helped me a great deal.

Now to write a proper ending...

I'm in a new book - "Dancing In The Shadows: A Tribute To Anne Rice". All proceeds go to Animal Rescue New Orleans. My story is "Dirty Unhappy Things". Ginger Nuts of Horror reviewed the book and my story was singled out! The review said: "The mysterious buildup to the fierce, wild brutality of Trish Wilson's "Dirty, Unhappy Things" is likely going to leave you in a state of shock". I'm delighted! Here's the Amazon link:

https://www.amazon.com/Dancing-Shadows-Tribute-Anne-Rice-ebook/dp/B09YNCL9L4/


My friend is in that too! She wrote the haunted aquarium story. Which story is yours?
 
2022-05-25 3:58:44 PM  

Spawn_of_Cthulhu: ms_lara_croft: toraque: Start plotting. Beginning a story is one of the most difficult parts of writing.

The late horror writer Tom Piccirilli used to host an exercise on Facebook. He'd ask everyone to Weeners paragraph of their WIP, and we'd rate each other's entries. The gist of it was to teach us to write a proper hook. Grab the reader within the first paragraph - preferably by the first line. It was a hard lesson to learn, but I've learned it after much practice. I've cut back on exposition. That exercise helped me a great deal.

Now to write a proper ending...

I'm in a new book - "Dancing In The Shadows: A Tribute To Anne Rice". All proceeds go to Animal Rescue New Orleans. My story is "Dirty Unhappy Things". Ginger Nuts of Horror reviewed the book and my story was singled out! The review said: "The mysterious buildup to the fierce, wild brutality of Trish Wilson's "Dirty, Unhappy Things" is likely going to leave you in a state of shock". I'm delighted! Here's the Amazon link:

https://www.amazon.com/Dancing-Shadows-Tribute-Anne-Rice-ebook/dp/B09YNCL9L4/

My friend is in that too! She wrote the haunted aquarium story. Which story is yours?


Never mind, I'm blind.
 
2022-05-25 4:07:06 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-05-25 4:07:58 PM  

Spawn_of_Cthulhu: I submitted my story Twist of DNA to the Fark anthology, as requested last week.  Did you get it?

Submitted another story to another open call anthology.

Waiting on my novel to come back from my editor so I can drop it in InDesign and send to Amazon. It's the follow-up (2nd in the series) to the one that came out last fall.

Researching a stand-alone horror novel that will involve MLMs and cults.

Thinking about designing a story-telling card deck set in my time-traveling lizard world.

Any writers in the CT area?  We have this event coming up June 25. There might be a couple of spaces still open, or just stop by and meet cool people like me.[Fark user image 850x1100]


Absolutely! I'm, uh, a bit behind on sending out receipt emails (and pretty much everything else) but I'll get that up to the readers as soon as possible. Thanks!
 
2022-05-25 4:11:49 PM  

Spawn_of_Cthulhu: ms_lara_croft: toraque: Start plotting. Beginning a story is one of the most difficult parts of writing.

The late horror writer Tom Piccirilli used to host an exercise on Facebook. He'd ask everyone to Weeners paragraph of their WIP, and we'd rate each other's entries. The gist of it was to teach us to write a proper hook. Grab the reader within the first paragraph - preferably by the first line. It was a hard lesson to learn, but I've learned it after much practice. I've cut back on exposition. That exercise helped me a great deal.

Now to write a proper ending...

I'm in a new book - "Dancing In The Shadows: A Tribute To Anne Rice". All proceeds go to Animal Rescue New Orleans. My story is "Dirty Unhappy Things". Ginger Nuts of Horror reviewed the book and my story was singled out! The review said: "The mysterious buildup to the fierce, wild brutality of Trish Wilson's "Dirty, Unhappy Things" is likely going to leave you in a state of shock". I'm delighted! Here's the Amazon link:

https://www.amazon.com/Dancing-Shadows-Tribute-Anne-Rice-ebook/dp/B09YNCL9L4/

My friend is in that too! She wrote the haunted aquarium story. Which story is yours?


Oh, cool! I haven't read the book yet. I need to order my copy. I wrote "Dirty Unhappy Things". It was a blast to write, too.
 
2022-05-25 4:20:43 PM  

Wenchmaster: I do have a semi-steampunk story I was working on for a friend who was trying to establish a Steampunk Shooting Society. Be warned- it's a bad attempt to copy Lovecraft's style:

*****
Notes from the Journal of Professor Erasmus Pulver


I rather like it, but find it a tad too tedious.  It captures the Victorian writing style well, but tries a bit too hard.
 
2022-05-25 4:41:11 PM  
Murderer, man? Murderer? Let me tell you about murder. It's fun, it's easy, and you gonna learn all about it - TIn Tin, The Crow (movie)
 
2022-05-25 5:07:47 PM  

Creepy Lurker Guy: Wenchmaster: I do have a semi-steampunk story I was working on for a friend who was trying to establish a Steampunk Shooting Society. Be warned- it's a bad attempt to copy Lovecraft's style:

*****
Notes from the Journal of Professor Erasmus Pulver

I rather like it, but find it a tad too tedious.  It captures the Victorian writing style well, but tries a bit too hard.


I did try to warn you.

I've no illusions of the tale's quality- trying to ape Lovecraft's prose style is difficult. More accurately, trying to ape a cheap mash-up of Lovecraft's and Stoker's prose style is difficult (and tedious). It gets a bit less tedious when they get to Africa. Once the build-up to the action gets going, I started dumping Victorian exposition and just went with trying to create the proper 'atmosphere'. Since I've never been to equatorial Africa (my visits have all been the northernmost bits of the continent), I started adding in a bit of Burroughs as well.

My friend liked it, but his Steampunk Action Shooting Society never took off, so the story (thankfully) has never before seen the light of day.
 
2022-05-25 5:11:24 PM  

ms_lara_croft: toraque: Start plotting. Beginning a story is one of the most difficult parts of writing.

The late horror writer Tom Piccirilli used to host an exercise on Facebook. He'd ask everyone to Weeners paragraph of their WIP, and we'd rate each other's entries. The gist of it was to teach us to write a proper hook. Grab the reader within the first paragraph - preferably by the first line. It was a hard lesson to learn, but I've learned it after much practice. I've cut back on exposition. That exercise helped me a great deal.

Now to write a proper ending...

I'm in a new book - "Dancing In The Shadows: A Tribute To Anne Rice". All proceeds go to Animal Rescue New Orleans. My story is "Dirty Unhappy Things". Ginger Nuts of Horror reviewed the book and my story was singled out! The review said: "The mysterious buildup to the fierce, wild brutality of Trish Wilson's "Dirty, Unhappy Things" is likely going to leave you in a state of shock". I'm delighted! Here's the Amazon link:

https://www.amazon.com/Dancing-Shadows-Tribute-Anne-Rice-ebook/dp/B09YNCL9L4/


Congratulations!
 
2022-05-25 5:26:23 PM  

Spawn_of_Cthulhu: Spawn_of_Cthulhu: ms_lara_croft: toraque: Start plotting. Beginning a story is one of the most difficult parts of writing.

The late horror writer Tom Piccirilli used to host an exercise on Facebook. He'd ask everyone to Weeners paragraph of their WIP, and we'd rate each other's entries. The gist of it was to teach us to write a proper hook. Grab the reader within the first paragraph - preferably by the first line. It was a hard lesson to learn, but I've learned it after much practice. I've cut back on exposition. That exercise helped me a great deal.

Now to write a proper ending...

I'm in a new book - "Dancing In The Shadows: A Tribute To Anne Rice". All proceeds go to Animal Rescue New Orleans. My story is "Dirty Unhappy Things". Ginger Nuts of Horror reviewed the book and my story was singled out! The review said: "The mysterious buildup to the fierce, wild brutality of Trish Wilson's "Dirty, Unhappy Things" is likely going to leave you in a state of shock". I'm delighted! Here's the Amazon link:

https://www.amazon.com/Dancing-Shadows-Tribute-Anne-Rice-ebook/dp/B09YNCL9L4/

My friend is in that too! She wrote the haunted aquarium story. Which story is yours?

Never mind, I'm blind.


Nah, that's okay. I'm blind, too. I just noticed I somehow snuck the word "Weeners" into my text, and I have no idea how it got there. LOL
 
2022-05-25 5:26:47 PM  

GN Nymph: ms_lara_croft: toraque: Start plotting. Beginning a story is one of the most difficult parts of writing.

The late horror writer Tom Piccirilli used to host an exercise on Facebook. He'd ask everyone to Weeners paragraph of their WIP, and we'd rate each other's entries. The gist of it was to teach us to write a proper hook. Grab the reader within the first paragraph - preferably by the first line. It was a hard lesson to learn, but I've learned it after much practice. I've cut back on exposition. That exercise helped me a great deal.

Now to write a proper ending...

I'm in a new book - "Dancing In The Shadows: A Tribute To Anne Rice". All proceeds go to Animal Rescue New Orleans. My story is "Dirty Unhappy Things". Ginger Nuts of Horror reviewed the book and my story was singled out! The review said: "The mysterious buildup to the fierce, wild brutality of Trish Wilson's "Dirty, Unhappy Things" is likely going to leave you in a state of shock". I'm delighted! Here's the Amazon link:

https://www.amazon.com/Dancing-Shadows-Tribute-Anne-Rice-ebook/dp/B09YNCL9L4/

Congratulations!


Thank you!
 
2022-05-25 5:32:16 PM  

Spawn_of_Cthulhu: ms_lara_croft: toraque: Start plotting. Beginning a story is one of the most difficult parts of writing.

The late horror writer Tom Piccirilli used to host an exercise on Facebook. He'd ask everyone to Weeners paragraph of their WIP, and we'd rate each other's entries. The gist of it was to teach us to write a proper hook. Grab the reader within the first paragraph - preferably by the first line. It was a hard lesson to learn, but I've learned it after much practice. I've cut back on exposition. That exercise helped me a great deal.

Now to write a proper ending...

I'm in a new book - "Dancing In The Shadows: A Tribute To Anne Rice". All proceeds go to Animal Rescue New Orleans. My story is "Dirty Unhappy Things". Ginger Nuts of Horror reviewed the book and my story was singled out! The review said: "The mysterious buildup to the fierce, wild brutality of Trish Wilson's "Dirty, Unhappy Things" is likely going to leave you in a state of shock". I'm delighted! Here's the Amazon link:

https://www.amazon.com/Dancing-Shadows-Tribute-Anne-Rice-ebook/dp/B09YNCL9L4/

My friend is in that too! She wrote the haunted aquarium story. Which story is yours?


I just found my draft copy of the book. I found the haunted aquarium story. I know Kristi! We're both in New England. Wow, small world!
 
2022-05-25 5:39:45 PM  

ms_lara_croft: Spawn_of_Cthulhu: ms_lara_croft: toraque: Start plotting. Beginning a story is one of the most difficult parts of writing.

The late horror writer Tom Piccirilli used to host an exercise on Facebook. He'd ask everyone to Weeners paragraph of their WIP, and we'd rate each other's entries. The gist of it was to teach us to write a proper hook. Grab the reader within the first paragraph - preferably by the first line. It was a hard lesson to learn, but I've learned it after much practice. I've cut back on exposition. That exercise helped me a great deal.

Now to write a proper ending...

I'm in a new book - "Dancing In The Shadows: A Tribute To Anne Rice". All proceeds go to Animal Rescue New Orleans. My story is "Dirty Unhappy Things". Ginger Nuts of Horror reviewed the book and my story was singled out! The review said: "The mysterious buildup to the fierce, wild brutality of Trish Wilson's "Dirty, Unhappy Things" is likely going to leave you in a state of shock". I'm delighted! Here's the Amazon link:

https://www.amazon.com/Dancing-Shadows-Tribute-Anne-Rice-ebook/dp/B09YNCL9L4/

My friend is in that too! She wrote the haunted aquarium story. Which story is yours?

I just found my draft copy of the book. I found the haunted aquarium story. I know Kristi! We're both in New England. Wow, small world!


That's 3 of us in New England since I'm in CT.  You should come to Bookfiend Reader's fest. Kristi and I will both be there.
 
2022-05-25 5:58:05 PM  
Plotting murder edition.


i1.sndcdn.comView Full Size
 
2022-05-25 6:02:14 PM  

Spawn_of_Cthulhu: ms_lara_croft: Spawn_of_Cthulhu: ms_lara_croft: toraque: Start plotting. Beginning a story is one of the most difficult parts of writing.

The late horror writer Tom Piccirilli used to host an exercise on Facebook. He'd ask everyone to Weeners paragraph of their WIP, and we'd rate each other's entries. The gist of it was to teach us to write a proper hook. Grab the reader within the first paragraph - preferably by the first line. It was a hard lesson to learn, but I've learned it after much practice. I've cut back on exposition. That exercise helped me a great deal.

Now to write a proper ending...

I'm in a new book - "Dancing In The Shadows: A Tribute To Anne Rice". All proceeds go to Animal Rescue New Orleans. My story is "Dirty Unhappy Things". Ginger Nuts of Horror reviewed the book and my story was singled out! The review said: "The mysterious buildup to the fierce, wild brutality of Trish Wilson's "Dirty, Unhappy Things" is likely going to leave you in a state of shock". I'm delighted! Here's the Amazon link:

https://www.amazon.com/Dancing-Shadows-Tribute-Anne-Rice-ebook/dp/B09YNCL9L4/

My friend is in that too! She wrote the haunted aquarium story. Which story is yours?

I just found my draft copy of the book. I found the haunted aquarium story. I know Kristi! We're both in New England. Wow, small world!

That's 3 of us in New England since I'm in CT.  You should come to Bookfiend Reader's fest. Kristi and I will both be there.


I'm in Massachusetts. I just looked up the Bookfiend Reader's Fest. That looks like fun! Are you going to NECON in July? It's in Lowell, Mass. this year. I'm going. Not sure if Kristi is.
 
2022-05-25 6:04:24 PM  

ms_lara_croft: Spawn_of_Cthulhu: ms_lara_croft: Spawn_of_Cthulhu: ms_lara_croft: toraque: Start plotting. Beginning a story is one of the most difficult parts of writing.

The late horror writer Tom Piccirilli used to host an exercise on Facebook. He'd ask everyone to Weeners paragraph of their WIP, and we'd rate each other's entries. The gist of it was to teach us to write a proper hook. Grab the reader within the first paragraph - preferably by the first line. It was a hard lesson to learn, but I've learned it after much practice. I've cut back on exposition. That exercise helped me a great deal.

Now to write a proper ending...

I'm in a new book - "Dancing In The Shadows: A Tribute To Anne Rice". All proceeds go to Animal Rescue New Orleans. My story is "Dirty Unhappy Things". Ginger Nuts of Horror reviewed the book and my story was singled out! The review said: "The mysterious buildup to the fierce, wild brutality of Trish Wilson's "Dirty, Unhappy Things" is likely going to leave you in a state of shock". I'm delighted! Here's the Amazon link:

https://www.amazon.com/Dancing-Shadows-Tribute-Anne-Rice-ebook/dp/B09YNCL9L4/

My friend is in that too! She wrote the haunted aquarium story. Which story is yours?

I just found my draft copy of the book. I found the haunted aquarium story. I know Kristi! We're both in New England. Wow, small world!

That's 3 of us in New England since I'm in CT.  You should come to Bookfiend Reader's fest. Kristi and I will both be there.

I'm in Massachusetts. I just looked up the Bookfiend Reader's Fest. That looks like fun! Are you going to NECON in July? It's in Lowell, Mass. this year. I'm going. Not sure if Kristi is.


NecronomiCon is where I'll be.  This summer.
 
2022-05-25 6:22:26 PM  

Spawn_of_Cthulhu: ms_lara_croft: Spawn_of_Cthulhu: ms_lara_croft: Spawn_of_Cthulhu: ms_lara_croft: toraque: Start plotting. Beginning a story is one of the most difficult parts of writing.

The late horror writer Tom Piccirilli used to host an exercise on Facebook. He'd ask everyone to Weeners paragraph of their WIP, and we'd rate each other's entries. The gist of it was to teach us to write a proper hook. Grab the reader within the first paragraph - preferably by the first line. It was a hard lesson to learn, but I've learned it after much practice. I've cut back on exposition. That exercise helped me a great deal.

Now to write a proper ending...

I'm in a new book - "Dancing In The Shadows: A Tribute To Anne Rice". All proceeds go to Animal Rescue New Orleans. My story is "Dirty Unhappy Things". Ginger Nuts of Horror reviewed the book and my story was singled out! The review said: "The mysterious buildup to the fierce, wild brutality of Trish Wilson's "Dirty, Unhappy Things" is likely going to leave you in a state of shock". I'm delighted! Here's the Amazon link:

https://www.amazon.com/Dancing-Shadows-Tribute-Anne-Rice-ebook/dp/B09YNCL9L4/

My friend is in that too! She wrote the haunted aquarium story. Which story is yours?

I just found my draft copy of the book. I found the haunted aquarium story. I know Kristi! We're both in New England. Wow, small world!

That's 3 of us in New England since I'm in CT.  You should come to Bookfiend Reader's fest. Kristi and I will both be there.

I'm in Massachusetts. I just looked up the Bookfiend Reader's Fest. That looks like fun! Are you going to NECON in July? It's in Lowell, Mass. this year. I'm going. Not sure if Kristi is.

NecronomiCon is where I'll be.  This summer.


I mean to get to that one eventually. I know it's a good one. Have a great time!
 
2022-05-25 7:42:51 PM  
My dog just died, so yeah.   But I am missing a target too.
 
2022-05-25 8:16:10 PM  
The Thing I Worked on Last Week looks like it might just be do-able by the deadline.  But thanks to a trip out of town for a friend's celebration of life this weekend, said deadline is Friday night.

On the plus side, my beta readers loved it.  One called me a mad genius and another bowed to me.  Here's hoping the fellowship readers feel the same.
 
2022-05-26 8:11:31 AM  

ms_lara_croft: Nah, that's okay. I'm blind, too. I just noticed I somehow snuck the word "Weeners" into my text, and I have no idea how it got there. LOL



That was the Fark filter, as it used to be an internet thing to race and be the Weeners on a thread, often with the two words that got replaced with "Weeners."
 
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