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(The Ringer)   Writer gets all cute and SEO, claims Jane's Addiction started 90s rock, then sneaks in "maybe" as what's left of his moldy hipster pride reminds him he's stupid for saying it   (theringer.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Jane's Addiction, Nothing's Shocking, Perry Farrell, importance of Jane, Dave Navarro, shining example of the Live Ms mentality, Perry Bernstein  
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658 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 25 May 2022 at 3:05 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-05-25 2:26:10 PM  
The parts that suck anyway, which was most of it after the early 90s.

/ somebody once noted that when times are good the music tends to suck.

// by that metric there should be bands churning out some really good material these days.
 
2022-05-25 3:07:17 PM  
Bali Eyes
Youtube g7Z4wkLRov4


Post-Janes, but I tend to like it better.
 
2022-05-25 3:09:39 PM  
Subby, I'm sorry to hear you've had a stroke and hope you get treatment as soon as possible.

Preferably before you write any more headline. At the very least, save your barely coherent rants for the comments section.
 
2022-05-25 3:10:44 PM  
I'll allow it. I've long maintained that Jane's Addiction and Pixies moved the needle in a way that really shaped the alt-rock landscape in the '90s.  Factor in the creation of Lollapalooza and JA had a major impact.
 
2022-05-25 3:12:25 PM  
Nothings Shocking - Up the Beach changed my life when I first heard it back in late 1980s.

Granted, I was so, so very high.

I still love that album so much.
 
2022-05-25 3:15:17 PM  

AlgaeRancher: The parts that suck anyway, which was most of it after the early 90s.

/ somebody once noted that when times are good the music tends to suck.

// by that metric there should be bands churning out some really good material these days.


There were alot of good rock albums from that era they just didn't get played on the radio.
 
2022-05-25 3:15:30 PM  
You could make the same argument about REM or Pixies or any number of "college rock" bands that were bubbling just under the mainstream in 1987.
 
2022-05-25 3:15:34 PM  

shoegaze99: Subby, I'm sorry to hear you've had a stroke and hope you get treatment as soon as possible.

Preferably before you write any more headline. At the very least, save your barely coherent rants for the comments section.


Hey it beats the stupid "site that says 'when I was in college'" headlines (probably) the same subby usually writes for Ringer articles
 
2022-05-25 3:24:44 PM  
Music critics have created a deeply simplified and outright wrong version of music history that goes, "There was hair metal, then Smells Like Teen Spirit came out and hair metal disappeared and everyone loved alternative."

They've repeated this myth so often, many people now take it as reality. Anyone who was awake at the time knows it isn't.

Jane's was among a handful of acts that set the stage for the takeover of "alternative" music, paving the way for the '90s boom along with acts like Red Hot Chili Peppers, R.E.M., and other early breakthroughs. The "College Rock" scene was surging by the late '80s. The Cure, Depeche Mode, and others were getting big mainstream hits. Yada yada.

Stuff like the Chili Peppers cover of "Higher Ground" started showing mainstream kids that these more offbeat acts could rock, too. Jane's Addiction got huge buzz for merging their artsy fartsy sensibilities with aspects of metal, glam rock, and classic rock. Stuff like "Man in the Box" from Alice in Chains was getting airplay on Headbangers Ball.

Plus a TON of other small breakthroughs that helped set the stage for what was to come. Alternative was already well on its way when Nirvana came along. Your stereotypical goon who only listened to top 40 may not have recognized it, but avid music fans did.

Nirvana was the next step in an evolution that had already been happening for a number of years. The music press made them the poster boys of the entire movement, but "first it was X, then Nirvana came and changed everything" was never actually true.

And yes, Jane's Addiction was a major part of the wave that laid the groundwork for that sea change in popular music, along with a bunch of other acts.
 
2022-05-25 3:25:37 PM  
The 1990's was a f*cking musical orgy explosion... there was a lot going on. You can't put all of that on any one band.
 
2022-05-25 3:32:03 PM  
Jane's Addiction was an 80s band.
 
2022-05-25 3:36:23 PM  
Wonderwall was exciting enough to turn off every time that noxious crap came on. StoppedReadingThere.gif.
 
2022-05-25 3:37:58 PM  

shoegaze99: Music critics have created a deeply simplified and outright wrong version of music history that goes, "There was hair metal, then Smells Like Teen Spirit came out and hair metal disappeared and everyone loved alternative."

They've repeated this myth so often, many people now take it as reality. Anyone who was awake at the time knows it isn't.

Jane's was among a handful of acts that set the stage for the takeover of "alternative" music, paving the way for the '90s boom along with acts like Red Hot Chili Peppers, R.E.M., and other early breakthroughs. The "College Rock" scene was surging by the late '80s. The Cure, Depeche Mode, and others were getting big mainstream hits. Yada yada.

Stuff like the Chili Peppers cover of "Higher Ground" started showing mainstream kids that these more offbeat acts could rock, too. Jane's Addiction got huge buzz for merging their artsy fartsy sensibilities with aspects of metal, glam rock, and classic rock. Stuff like "Man in the Box" from Alice in Chains was getting airplay on Headbangers Ball.

Plus a TON of other small breakthroughs that helped set the stage for what was to come. Alternative was already well on its way when Nirvana came along. Your stereotypical goon who only listened to top 40 may not have recognized it, but avid music fans did.

Nirvana was the next step in an evolution that had already been happening for a number of years. The music press made them the poster boys of the entire movement, but "first it was X, then Nirvana came and changed everything" was never actually true.

And yes, Jane's Addiction was a major part of the wave that laid the groundwork for that sea change in popular music, along with a bunch of other acts.


So what you're basically saying is that Nirvana killed 80s music, which was all hair metal, and replaced it with good music and paved the way for the best form of music with bands like Limp Bizkit and Korn.
 
zez
2022-05-25 3:39:41 PM  
I remember hearing about this new rock band called Jane's Addiction and then listened to Nothing's Shocking and thought, "This doesn't sound like rock music, but it's pretty good"
 
2022-05-25 3:41:37 PM  
Who?!
 
2022-05-25 3:43:24 PM  

JerkfaceMcGee: Who?!


Olivia Rodrigo's musical forebears.
 
2022-05-25 3:43:40 PM  

Snapper Carr: You could make the same argument about REM or Pixies or any number of "college rock" bands that were bubbling just under the mainstream in 1987.


Yep, they absolutely were.

MTV's 120 Minutes was launched in 1986, and tons of future stars were featured there (and as anyone old enough remembers, MTV used to be hugely influential with youth music).

R.E.M. was already poised to be the "next big thing." They'd had a couple of minor crossover hits that already put them on the radar, enough so that they ended up on Warners for Green.

Pixies had a few pretty successful singles in '88 and '89.

You had The Smithereens with "Only a Memory" and "The House We Used to Live in" doing well (the former went to #1 on the college charts and hit the top 100 in the mainstream charts).

The Cure's "Just Like Heaven" was 1987, and in 1989 their Disintegration album fell just short of the top 10 in the U.S., which is remarkable for a British goth record at the time.

Sonic Youth's "Kool Thing" caught them attention in 1990.

Jesus and Mary Chain has a big hit with "Head On" in 1989.

Dinosaur Jr.'s "Freak Scene" was a huge college rock anthem in 1988.

And god, so many more. The Replacements, Soul Asylum, Black Flag, Joy Division, The Smiths, 10,000 Maniacs.

Every year from the mid '80s forward, this stuff became a little more prominent and crept further and further into the mainstream charts. It didn't DOMINATE yet, but it was all setting the stage for the brief takeover of popular music to come.
 
2022-05-25 3:44:16 PM  
Subtonic:

You forgot Nickelback and That Shrek band
 
2022-05-25 3:51:27 PM  

Subtonic: shoegaze99: Music critics have created a deeply simplified and outright wrong version of music history that goes, "There was hair metal, then Smells Like Teen Spirit came out and hair metal disappeared and everyone loved alternative."

They've repeated this myth so often, many people now take it as reality. Anyone who was awake at the time knows it isn't.

Jane's was among a handful of acts that set the stage for the takeover of "alternative" music, paving the way for the '90s boom along with acts like Red Hot Chili Peppers, R.E.M., and other early breakthroughs. The "College Rock" scene was surging by the late '80s. The Cure, Depeche Mode, and others were getting big mainstream hits. Yada yada.

Stuff like the Chili Peppers cover of "Higher Ground" started showing mainstream kids that these more offbeat acts could rock, too. Jane's Addiction got huge buzz for merging their artsy fartsy sensibilities with aspects of metal, glam rock, and classic rock. Stuff like "Man in the Box" from Alice in Chains was getting airplay on Headbangers Ball.

Plus a TON of other small breakthroughs that helped set the stage for what was to come. Alternative was already well on its way when Nirvana came along. Your stereotypical goon who only listened to top 40 may not have recognized it, but avid music fans did.

Nirvana was the next step in an evolution that had already been happening for a number of years. The music press made them the poster boys of the entire movement, but "first it was X, then Nirvana came and changed everything" was never actually true.

And yes, Jane's Addiction was a major part of the wave that laid the groundwork for that sea change in popular music, along with a bunch of other acts.

So what you're basically saying is that Nirvana killed 80s music, which was all hair metal, and replaced it with good music and paved the way for the best form of music with bands like Limp Bizkit and Korn.


"Before Kurt there was nothing"
 
2022-05-25 3:56:02 PM  
Nothing's Shocking* is a powerhouse of a record and a seminal masterpiece.

*Does not contain the radio/MTV darling Been Caught Stealing
 
2022-05-25 4:27:35 PM  

Bukharin: Jane's Addiction was an 80s band.


Came here to point this out.
 
2022-05-25 4:28:08 PM  
I'm seeing Jane's Addiction open for Smashing Pumpkins later this year.

/I'm pretty excited
 
2022-05-25 4:35:28 PM  

shoegaze99: Snapper Carr: You could make the same argument about REM or Pixies or any number of "college rock" bands that were bubbling just under the mainstream in 1987.

Yep, they absolutely were.

MTV's 120 Minutes was launched in 1986, and tons of future stars were featured there (and as anyone old enough remembers, MTV used to be hugely influential with youth music).

R.E.M. was already poised to be the "next big thing." They'd had a couple of minor crossover hits that already put them on the radar, enough so that they ended up on Warners for Green.

Pixies had a few pretty successful singles in '88 and '89.

You had The Smithereens with "Only a Memory" and "The House We Used to Live in" doing well (the former went to #1 on the college charts and hit the top 100 in the mainstream charts).

The Cure's "Just Like Heaven" was 1987, and in 1989 their Disintegration album fell just short of the top 10 in the U.S., which is remarkable for a British goth record at the time.

Sonic Youth's "Kool Thing" caught them attention in 1990.

Jesus and Mary Chain has a big hit with "Head On" in 1989.

Dinosaur Jr.'s "Freak Scene" was a huge college rock anthem in 1988.

And god, so many more. The Replacements, Soul Asylum, Black Flag, Joy Division, The Smiths, 10,000 Maniacs.

Every year from the mid '80s forward, this stuff became a little more prominent and crept further and further into the mainstream charts. It didn't DOMINATE yet, but it was all setting the stage for the brief takeover of popular music to come.


Black Flag.  Now there is a band I have not thought of in a long time.
 
2022-05-25 4:43:38 PM  
Ocean Size and Summertime Rolls still make my top ten favorite songs and have since i first heard that album.
 
2022-05-25 4:44:39 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size

It started in '77.
 
2022-05-25 4:58:44 PM  

shoegaze99: Music critics have created a deeply simplified and outright wrong version of music history that goes, "There was hair metal, then Smells Like Teen Spirit came out and hair metal disappeared and everyone loved alternative."

They've repeated this myth so often, many people now take it as reality.



pretty good take on this, right there.

you could probably also say this about how 'music was a shallow doo-wop wasteland the beatles and the rolling stones changed music forever', 'punk had to happen because disco/fleetwood mac/prog' and any number of oversimplifications around techno, new wave, singer-songwriters and so on
 
2022-05-25 5:06:09 PM  

Streetwise Hercules: [Fark user image 425x425]
It started in '77.


I was going to say '79, but I like the way you think.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-05-25 5:31:38 PM  

Todorojo: Nothing's Shocking* is a powerhouse of a record and a seminal masterpiece.

*Does not contain the radio/MTV darling Been Caught Stealing


i can never fully integrate that Been Caught Stealing is not a Porno For Pyros song
 
2022-05-25 5:32:46 PM  

NewportBarGuy: The 1990's was a f*cking musical orgy explosion... there was a lot going on. You can't put all of that on any one band.


I was just talking about this with a friend who plays in a cover band: if you had gone back to 1999 and told me the ONE sound that survives that decade was Blink farking 182, I would've laughed then cried.
 
2022-05-25 5:41:09 PM  
Both The Ringer and Grantland (which was good otherwise) have the absolutely most cringe inducing popular culture takes it's possible to have. The Ringer is so far up Drake's ass his uvula is tickling their nose and they routinely break down shiatty modern hip hop records track by track like they are some lost farking Rosetta Stone. Their film coverage is just as dire unless you're a boomer frat boy whose tastes haven't changed since high school.
 
2022-05-25 5:49:32 PM  
Honorable mention: "3 days" off of JA's Ritual de lo Habitual is outstanding.  Actually, every song but "Been Caught Stealing" is fantastic.
 
2022-05-25 6:10:01 PM  
Took until the '90's to catch up with Iggy Pop
 
2022-05-25 6:36:49 PM  
On my dorm floor in the fall of '88 a near-majority of us loved Janes Addiction and Guns n' Roses.

At that early time, we knew that they were going to team up with whoever was coming down the road and kill hair metal. Even though GnR was largely a hair metal band. They were easily worth 100 Winger/Warrant/Whitesnake/White Lions.

As for Janes, it took me a few spins to get used to Perry's voice, but once I did, it clicked, and I was a fan for life.
 
2022-05-25 6:38:51 PM  

LewDux: Subtonic: shoegaze99: Music critics have created a deeply simplified and outright wrong version of music history that goes, "There was hair metal, then Smells Like Teen Spirit came out and hair metal disappeared and everyone loved alternative."

They've repeated this myth so often, many people now take it as reality. Anyone who was awake at the time knows it isn't.

Jane's was among a handful of acts that set the stage for the takeover of "alternative" music, paving the way for the '90s boom along with acts like Red Hot Chili Peppers, R.E.M., and other early breakthroughs. The "College Rock" scene was surging by the late '80s. The Cure, Depeche Mode, and others were getting big mainstream hits. Yada yada.

Stuff like the Chili Peppers cover of "Higher Ground" started showing mainstream kids that these more offbeat acts could rock, too. Jane's Addiction got huge buzz for merging their artsy fartsy sensibilities with aspects of metal, glam rock, and classic rock. Stuff like "Man in the Box" from Alice in Chains was getting airplay on Headbangers Ball.

Plus a TON of other small breakthroughs that helped set the stage for what was to come. Alternative was already well on its way when Nirvana came along. Your stereotypical goon who only listened to top 40 may not have recognized it, but avid music fans did.

Nirvana was the next step in an evolution that had already been happening for a number of years. The music press made them the poster boys of the entire movement, but "first it was X, then Nirvana came and changed everything" was never actually true.

And yes, Jane's Addiction was a major part of the wave that laid the groundwork for that sea change in popular music, along with a bunch of other acts.

So what you're basically saying is that Nirvana killed 80s music, which was all hair metal, and replaced it with good music and paved the way for the best form of music with bands like Limp Bizkit and Korn.

"Before Kurt there was nothing"


Before Nirvana's rise, the underground/college radio scene was a place for all kinds of music, lots of it quirky and offbeat.  They Might Be Giants, Camper Van Beethoven, Sugarcubes, Trash Can Sinatras, Violent Femmes, Dead Milkmen, and dozens of others.  But, after Nevermind, the only thing left standing was big (often dumb) 70s rock retreads (looking at you, Pear Jam).  And the British acts, like Robyn Hitchcock, Teenage Fanclub, and Siouxsie and the Banshees that had worked for years and were finally making inroads with American audiences?  Absolutely shut out of the new movement.

Of course, it isn't Kurt's fault.  He just made a record.  But the fallout from its popularity caused incalculable harm to actually interesting artists.  So, yeah.  Nirvana killed 80s music - and not just the awful stuff like hair metal.
 
2022-05-25 6:41:36 PM  

plecos: Honorable mention: "3 days" off of JA's Ritual de lo Habitual is outstanding.  Actually, every song but "Been Caught Stealing" is fantastic.


dave navarro might be cheesier than an explosion at a fondue festival but the man can play the guitar.  three days is quality dave.

eric a with the pbass running through a GK i have always described as a velvet sledgehammer.

if you haven't heard Deconstruction, check it out though you might have to hit YouTube or the sharing portals.
 
2022-05-25 6:44:03 PM  

Cinedelic: LewDux: Subtonic: shoegaze99: Music critics have created a deeply simplified and outright wrong version of music history that goes, "There was hair metal, then Smells Like Teen Spirit came out and hair metal disappeared and everyone loved alternative."

They've repeated this myth so often, many people now take it as reality. Anyone who was awake at the time knows it isn't.

Jane's was among a handful of acts that set the stage for the takeover of "alternative" music, paving the way for the '90s boom along with acts like Red Hot Chili Peppers, R.E.M., and other early breakthroughs. The "College Rock" scene was surging by the late '80s. The Cure, Depeche Mode, and others were getting big mainstream hits. Yada yada.

Stuff like the Chili Peppers cover of "Higher Ground" started showing mainstream kids that these more offbeat acts could rock, too. Jane's Addiction got huge buzz for merging their artsy fartsy sensibilities with aspects of metal, glam rock, and classic rock. Stuff like "Man in the Box" from Alice in Chains was getting airplay on Headbangers Ball.

Plus a TON of other small breakthroughs that helped set the stage for what was to come. Alternative was already well on its way when Nirvana came along. Your stereotypical goon who only listened to top 40 may not have recognized it, but avid music fans did.

Nirvana was the next step in an evolution that had already been happening for a number of years. The music press made them the poster boys of the entire movement, but "first it was X, then Nirvana came and changed everything" was never actually true.

And yes, Jane's Addiction was a major part of the wave that laid the groundwork for that sea change in popular music, along with a bunch of other acts.

So what you're basically saying is that Nirvana killed 80s music, which was all hair metal, and replaced it with good music and paved the way for the best form of music with bands like Limp Bizkit and Korn.

"Before Kurt there was nothing"

Before Nirvana's ris ...


This will make me sound like I'm trying to be a music hipster here, but this is true: The first time I heard "Smells Like Teen Spirit", my reaction, to my roommate my freshman year of college, was, "This is kind of cool, sounds like the Pixies."

Of course, later, I'd see that Kurt Cobain would admit that he ripped off the Pixies in that song, and I'd figure out much of what the Pixies were doing was ripping off Hüsker Dü.  And, in turn, Hüsker Dü was ripping off Buzzcocks.  So it's all a big cycle.
 
2022-05-25 6:59:23 PM  
Yep, as an also-hipstergenX, Jane's was a huge influence and kick that helped push alternative over the hump into a revolution.  Us hair-metal teens in the 80s took one listen of Nothing's Shocking and threw our Crue and Dokken tapes in the gutter.
 
2022-05-25 7:17:16 PM  
SoundScan gets no respect
 
2022-05-25 7:40:46 PM  
Perry is just one of those people who has an IT factor. amazing front man.
 
2022-05-25 7:47:49 PM  

Garza and the Supermutants: On my dorm floor in the fall of '88 a near-majority of us loved Janes Addiction and Guns n' Roses.

At that early time, we knew that they were going to team up with whoever was coming down the road and kill hair metal. Even though GnR was largely a hair metal band. They were easily worth 100 Winger/Warrant/Whitesnake/White Lions.

As for Janes, it took me a few spins to get used to Perry's voice, but once I did, it clicked, and I was a fan for life.


Same here; glad we weren't as potbound by listening to narrow sub genres back then, because both bands rocked and put out incredible first studio albums.
 
2022-05-25 7:49:58 PM  
Seen both Jane's and NIN separately but seeing them together was a dream.

Side note... Told my friends that came with me. All I need to hear is 3 days and I'm happy and then they played that as the first track and my friends are like okay. You ready to go?
 
2022-05-25 7:50:07 PM  

Cinedelic: LewDux: Subtonic: shoegaze99: Music critics have created a deeply simplified and outright wrong version of music history that goes, "There was hair metal, then Smells Like Teen Spirit came out and hair metal disappeared and everyone loved alternative."

They've repeated this myth so often, many people now take it as reality. Anyone who was awake at the time knows it isn't.

Jane's was among a handful of acts that set the stage for the takeover of "alternative" music, paving the way for the '90s boom along with acts like Red Hot Chili Peppers, R.E.M., and other early breakthroughs. The "College Rock" scene was surging by the late '80s. The Cure, Depeche Mode, and others were getting big mainstream hits. Yada yada.

Stuff like the Chili Peppers cover of "Higher Ground" started showing mainstream kids that these more offbeat acts could rock, too. Jane's Addiction got huge buzz for merging their artsy fartsy sensibilities with aspects of metal, glam rock, and classic rock. Stuff like "Man in the Box" from Alice in Chains was getting airplay on Headbangers Ball.

Plus a TON of other small breakthroughs that helped set the stage for what was to come. Alternative was already well on its way when Nirvana came along. Your stereotypical goon who only listened to top 40 may not have recognized it, but avid music fans did.

Nirvana was the next step in an evolution that had already been happening for a number of years. The music press made them the poster boys of the entire movement, but "first it was X, then Nirvana came and changed everything" was never actually true.

And yes, Jane's Addiction was a major part of the wave that laid the groundwork for that sea change in popular music, along with a bunch of other acts.

So what you're basically saying is that Nirvana killed 80s music, which was all hair metal, and replaced it with good music and paved the way for the best form of music with bands like Limp Bizkit and Korn.

"Before Kurt there was nothing"

Before Nirvana's ris ...


I mean, college radio never changed. They turned on Nirvana and Pear Jam instantly, despite playing the hell out of Bleach and Green River/MLB. Mudhoney and Screaming Trees were basically the only Seattle bands it was cool to like.
 
2022-05-25 8:17:46 PM  

shoegaze99: Music critics have created a deeply simplified and outright wrong version of music history that goes, "There was hair metal, then Smells Like Teen Spirit came out and hair metal disappeared and everyone loved alternative."

They've repeated this myth so often, many people now take it as reality. Anyone who was awake at the time knows it isn't.

Jane's was among a handful of acts that set the stage for the takeover of "alternative" music, paving the way for the '90s boom along with acts like Red Hot Chili Peppers, R.E.M., and other early breakthroughs. The "College Rock" scene was surging by the late '80s. The Cure, Depeche Mode, and others were getting big mainstream hits. Yada yada.

Stuff like the Chili Peppers cover of "Higher Ground" started showing mainstream kids that these more offbeat acts could rock, too. Jane's Addiction got huge buzz for merging their artsy fartsy sensibilities with aspects of metal, glam rock, and classic rock. Stuff like "Man in the Box" from Alice in Chains was getting airplay on Headbangers Ball.

Plus a TON of other small breakthroughs that helped set the stage for what was to come. Alternative was already well on its way when Nirvana came along. Your stereotypical goon who only listened to top 40 may not have recognized it, but avid music fans did.

Nirvana was the next step in an evolution that had already been happening for a number of years. The music press made them the poster boys of the entire movement, but "first it was X, then Nirvana came and changed everything" was never actually true.

And yes, Jane's Addiction was a major part of the wave that laid the groundwork for that sea change in popular music, along with a bunch of other acts.


Thank you. Music journalism is usually revisionist, but this meme will not die. You can go look at sales and tours: Def Leppard, Aerosmith, Bon Jovi, and AC/DC all did good for themselves for a few more years.

I'd add to it that the pop side of things getting even more superficial wasn't helpful: The Milli Vanilli scandal happened around this time as well, confirming everyone's assumptions that Top 40 was just dudes in a studio propping up talentless pretty people. Ditto New Kids or Vanilla Ice. Meanwhile the grandkids of Ozzie and Harriet were going Double Platinum as a Metal band and had a lame ballad as their main song. Michael Farking Bolton wrote a song for KISS and it turned into a smash hit on the radio.

Something was going to have to give eventually.
 
2022-05-25 8:21:01 PM  
Where is this writers mind, husker du?
 
2022-05-25 8:40:19 PM  
never heard of Jane's Addiction until I got to college in the fall of '90, and it seemed like everybody had that album. always thought they were pretty good - it sure as hell beat all of the crappy hair band stuff going on at the time.

and when I got to college - one of the first things I joined was the radio station (90 point 5 - WVBU Lewisburg - the voice of Bucknell University..."). I swear we had Nirvana's Nevermind album months before they broke. if you did a show you could play pretty much anything you wanted, but had to play so many cuts off the playlist per hour. the music director had some really eclectic tastes, and Nirvana was the only rock on there so I played every single cut off that for months (followed by Pearl Jam's 10 stuff). I was sick of hearing that by the time Nirvana played SNL and you heard "Smells Like Teen Spirit" playing everywhere. it was weird how quickly all of those 80's hair bands became totally uncool almost overnight after that. the early 90's just had a lot of great music before it all started to suck

/got my AARP card today so I'm feeling nostalgic for the old days right about now
//also - get off my lawn
 
2022-05-25 8:46:31 PM  
Meanwhile the grandkids of Ozzie and Harriet were going Double Platinum as a Metal band

I mean, Ricky Nelson was talented as hell. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qiuGGagp67Y
 
2022-05-25 9:23:16 PM  
I think people get Nirvana's place in things all wrong. Nirvana didn't kill off any music, and it didn't start anything. It was a peak moment. Nevermind was such a stand out that no one could ignore it. Rap fans, metal fans, alt rock fans, even top 40 fans all listened to Smells Like Teen Spirit and found something notable about it. I think people want to ascribe more significance to Nirvana because bands that are that big are so rare the some people feel that the band must have some kind of greater impact than just being extremely successful. Nirvana didn't invent the game or change the game, they just played the game very, very well. In fact I think they were the last new rock band to play the game that well. Since rock died around 15 to 20 years after Cobain, I think Nirvana will always be the last big new thing in rock.
 
2022-05-25 10:08:57 PM  

LewDux: Subtonic: shoegaze99: Music critics have created a deeply simplified and outright wrong version of music history that goes, "There was hair metal, then Smells Like Teen Spirit came out and hair metal disappeared and everyone loved alternative."

They've repeated this myth so often, many people now take it as reality. Anyone who was awake at the time knows it isn't.

Jane's was among a handful of acts that set the stage for the takeover of "alternative" music, paving the way for the '90s boom along with acts like Red Hot Chili Peppers, R.E.M., and other early breakthroughs. The "College Rock" scene was surging by the late '80s. The Cure, Depeche Mode, and others were getting big mainstream hits. Yada yada.

Stuff like the Chili Peppers cover of "Higher Ground" started showing mainstream kids that these more offbeat acts could rock, too. Jane's Addiction got huge buzz for merging their artsy fartsy sensibilities with aspects of metal, glam rock, and classic rock. Stuff like "Man in the Box" from Alice in Chains was getting airplay on Headbangers Ball.

Plus a TON of other small breakthroughs that helped set the stage for what was to come. Alternative was already well on its way when Nirvana came along. Your stereotypical goon who only listened to top 40 may not have recognized it, but avid music fans did.

Nirvana was the next step in an evolution that had already been happening for a number of years. The music press made them the poster boys of the entire movement, but "first it was X, then Nirvana came and changed everything" was never actually true.

And yes, Jane's Addiction was a major part of the wave that laid the groundwork for that sea change in popular music, along with a bunch of other acts.

So what you're basically saying is that Nirvana killed 80s music, which was all hair metal, and replaced it with good music and paved the way for the best form of music with bands like Limp Bizkit and Korn.

"Before Kurt there was nothing"


Kurt Loder? Maybe.
 
2022-05-25 10:17:24 PM  

csi_yellowknife: Thank you. Music journalism is usually revisionist, but this meme will not die. You can go look at sales and tours: Def Leppard, Aerosmith, Bon Jovi, and AC/DC all did good for themselves for a few more years.


Silent Lucidity was soooo huge.
 
2022-05-25 10:37:58 PM  
This is the playlist for the 4th episode of "120 Minutes" (the earliest available online)

April 27, 1986

No Money Down - Lou Reed
Digging Your Scene - The Blow Monkeys
'Peter Gunn' Theme - The Art of Noise
Ever Take No For An Answer - The Epidemics
Fade Away - Bodeans
Bittersweet - Hoodoo Gurus
I Wanna Be A Cowboy - Boys Don't Cry
Modern Times - Latin Quarter
What's Gone Wrong - The Untouchables
Years Later - Cactus World News
Alone Without You - King
Somebody Somewhere - Platinum Blonde
Under The Influence - Vanity
Once Bitten, Twice Shy - Chacko (not the Ian Hunter tune)
Bachelor Kisses - The Go Betweens
House of Stone - Roaring Boys
Stay - Oingo Boingo
Break The Ice (from "Rad") - John Farnham
Only Time Will Tell - Sharks
Fire With Fire - Wild Blue
Language Is A Virus - Laurie Anderson
Boystown - Rob Jungklas
Feel The Heat - Jean Beauvoir
 
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