Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(IFL Science)   "Mirror World" may explain discrepancies in measurement of Hubble constant and the sudden appearance of your friend's goatee   (iflscience.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Universe, Particle physics, Standard Model, Elementary particle, Physics, Quark, mirror world, General relativity  
•       •       •

557 clicks; posted to STEM » on 25 May 2022 at 6:18 AM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



4 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-05-25 6:37:03 AM  
encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.comView Full Size
 
2022-05-25 9:23:53 AM  

leeksfromchichis: [encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com image 289x300]


southpark-online.nlView Full Size
 
2022-05-25 12:42:32 PM  
I theorized a long time ago that half of the universe (visible or not) is antimatter. Photons are the same in both. At the Big Bang an equal amount of matter and antimatter was created and they went in opposite directions. Light from the antimatter half is still visible to us.
 
2022-05-25 4:26:26 PM  

madgonad: I theorized a long time ago that half of the universe (visible or not) is antimatter. Photons are the same in both. At the Big Bang an equal amount of matter and antimatter was created and they went in opposite directions. Light from the antimatter half is still visible to us.


Clever, but somehow physicists determined there's asymmetrical amounts of both with "regular" matter being more abundant.
 
Displayed 4 of 4 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.