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(EurekAlert)   After years of painstaking research, we have concluded that these daggers were used as knives   (eurekalert.org) divider line
    More: Obvious, Scanning electron microscope, Collagen, Scientific method, Newcastle upon Tyne, Electron microscope, Prehistory, Bronze Age, Analysis of Bronze Age daggers  
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855 clicks; posted to STEM » on 23 May 2022 at 7:12 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



19 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-05-23 5:45:33 PM  
Didn't we do this story a couple of months ago? When it was in an actual science magazine?

For anybody that missed it the first time, it was long considered that the daggers were purely ceremonial, but it now seems they were actually used. So not "Obvious" at all and Subby gets a double Fail tag.
 
2022-05-23 6:30:35 PM  
So they weren't ritual daggers?
You don't say?
I'm beginning to think that in olden times when you had to make tools by hand they were used for tool shiat and not so much for made up "rituals" that archeologists seem to think societies of yor had so much time for.
 
2022-05-23 8:21:55 PM  

vudukungfu: So they weren't ritual daggers?
You don't say?
I'm beginning to think that in olden times when you had to make tools by hand they were used for tool shiat and not so much for made up "rituals" that archeologists seem to think societies of yor had so much time for.


Lots of things were clearly made for rituals, ceremonies, or grave goods. This is entirely uncontroversial and incontrovertible.

But do please tell us again how you know so much more about this than the entire archaeological profession.
 
2022-05-23 8:45:37 PM  
Wait, a hunter-gatherer's best and favorite knife was used to kill and eat things?

Color me shocked.. that this would be a surprise to anyone.
 
2022-05-23 9:01:12 PM  
I took an Anthropology course in college to satisfy a general education requirement. One project was semester long: to research a fragment of what appeared to be from a ceramic vessel. Don't worry, it wasn't a valuable artifact, just a mock piece used for the lesson. After 16 weeks it was determined to have come from a piece of pottery and was cataloged and entered into the library.
 
2022-05-23 9:02:45 PM  

CFitzsimmons: I took an Anthropology course in college to satisfy a general education requirement. One project was semester long: to research a fragment of what appeared to be from a ceramic vessel. Don't worry, it wasn't a valuable artifact, just a mock piece used for the lesson. After 16 weeks it was determined to have come from a piece of pottery and was cataloged and entered into the library.


Following hours of vigorous debate as to whether or not it came from a bong?
 
2022-05-23 9:25:01 PM  

HugeMistake: vudukungfu: So they weren't ritual daggers?
You don't say?
I'm beginning to think that in olden times when you had to make tools by hand they were used for tool shiat and not so much for made up "rituals" that archeologists seem to think societies of yor had so much time for.

Lots of things were clearly made for rituals, ceremonies, or grave goods. This is entirely uncontroversial and incontrovertible.


You also know at least some archaeologists had a guy like this living in their dormitory during undergrad.

Fark user imageView Full Size


/Majoring in Japanese, of course
//Anime Club president
///Three slashies of katana
 
2022-05-24 1:52:13 AM  
What do you think archaeologists 1000 years from now will make of this?

Fark user imageView Full Size
The little can opener was most baffling to them because cans all have little ring-top openers so can openers will be obsolete in a few years.
 
2022-05-24 2:17:13 AM  
Stone blades were sharper, stronger and easier to make.
 
2022-05-24 3:00:29 AM  

HugeMistake: Didn't we do this story a couple of months ago? When it was in an actual science magazine?


Yes

https://phys.org/news/2022-04-bronze-age-daggers.html?ICID=ref_fark

HugeMistake: For anybody that missed it the first time, it was long considered that the daggers were purely ceremonial, but it now seems they were actually used. So not "Obvious" at all and Subby gets a double Fail tag.


No

"As daggers are often found in weapon-rich male burials, or "warrior graves," many researchers speculated that they were primarily ceremonial objects used in prehistoric funerals to mark out the identity and status of the deceased. Others suggested that they may have been used as weapons or tools for crafts.
 
2022-05-24 3:04:53 AM  
Le sigh. This is a good example of when entrenched thought becomes ossified. Which is ironic, but terribly appropriate. Archeology as a whole has for many many years been of the opinion that "they know how everything worked", whether they consciously express that, or not. A product of the process, which needs a major overhaul. Maddening, on so many levels.
/worse than engineers
//make politicians almost seem credible
 
2022-05-24 3:05:26 AM  

HugeMistake: vudukungfu: So they weren't ritual daggers?
You don't say?
I'm beginning to think that in olden times when you had to make tools by hand they were used for tool shiat and not so much for made up "rituals" that archeologists seem to think societies of yor had so much time for.

Lots of things were clearly made for rituals, ceremonies, or grave goods. This is entirely uncontroversial and incontrovertible.

But do please tell us again how you know so much more about this than the entire archaeological profession.


Clearly you don't have Phd in Attempted Archeological Speculation
 
2022-05-24 3:16:50 AM  
1. Speculated.. suggested..
2. ???
3. This is a good example of when entrenched thought becomes ossified.
 
2022-05-24 3:17:17 AM  

snowballinhell: Which is ironic,


external-content.duckduckgo.comView Full Size
 
2022-05-24 6:18:15 AM  

vudukungfu: So they weren't ritual daggers?
You don't say?
I'm beginning to think that in olden times when you had to make tools by hand they were used for tool shiat and not so much for made up "rituals" that archeologists seem to think societies of yor had so much time for.


There is a joke that anything archeologists don't understand is deemed "for ritual purpose". That's so old and known, I remember they made a joke out of it in a "choose your own adventure" book I read as a kid. It was in a far future, post-apocalyptic and when visiting a museum, there was an artefact that was described as a ritual item from our time. From the description, it was very obviously a hand grenade.
 
2022-05-24 6:55:52 AM  

Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: Wait, a hunter-gatherer's best and favorite knife was used to kill and eat things?

Color me shocked.. that this would be a surprise to anyone.


At the risk of repeating myself: Lots of things were clearly made for rituals, ceremonies, or grave goods. This is entirely uncontroversial and incontrovertible.

But do please tell us again how you know so much more about this than the entire archaeological profession.
 
2022-05-24 7:29:32 AM  

My Sober Alt: What do you think archaeologists 1000 years from now will make of this?

[Fark user image 850x850]The little can opener was most baffling to them because cans all have little ring-top openers so can openers will be obsolete in a few years.


Especially if they try and figure out the ritual uses it had in the contemporary leather scene.
 
2022-05-24 9:26:27 PM  

HugeMistake: Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: Wait, a hunter-gatherer's best and favorite knife was used to kill and eat things?

Color me shocked.. that this would be a surprise to anyone.

At the risk of repeating myself: Lots of things were clearly made for rituals, ceremonies, or grave goods. This is entirely uncontroversial and incontrovertible.

But do please tell us again how you know so much more about this than the entire archaeological profession.


You tell me how they're certain that they're made for show and not use. We seem to have proof now that they were made for use.
 
2022-05-25 1:54:38 AM  

Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: HugeMistake: Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: Wait, a hunter-gatherer's best and favorite knife was used to kill and eat things?

Color me shocked.. that this would be a surprise to anyone.

At the risk of repeating myself: Lots of things were clearly made for rituals, ceremonies, or grave goods. This is entirely uncontroversial and incontrovertible.

But do please tell us again how you know so much more about this than the entire archaeological profession.

You tell me how they're certain that they're made for show and not use. We seem to have proof now that they were made for use.


Building a strawhenge, aren't we?

"As daggers are often found in weapon-rich male burials, or "warrior graves," many researchers speculated that they were primarily ceremonial objects used in prehistoric funerals to mark out the identity and status of the deceased. Others suggested that they may have been used as weapons or tools for crafts.
 
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