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(Phys Org2)   High school students design cheap filter for lead using 3D printing and basic chemistry. Reverse osmosis systems cost hundreds to thousands of dollars, while carbon block filters have to be replaced every few months, so this thing fills a niche   (phys.org) divider line
    More: Cool, Chemistry, Calcium, Potassium, Chemical reaction, Joe Biden, low-cost lead filter, pandemic forced schools, working prototype  
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1196 clicks; posted to STEM » on 22 May 2022 at 4:50 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



27 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-05-22 12:21:05 PM  
"Impressive.  What's it made from?"
"Chrysotile"
 
2022-05-22 2:18:17 PM  
Household RO systems don't cost hundreds of thousands of dollars.  If these filters are for point of use then that would be a better comparison.

Glad to see Hermione Grainger is still out there doing good things for the world.
 
2022-05-22 3:00:48 PM  
Pur?
 
2022-05-22 4:59:04 PM  
I'm simultaneously impressed that this is possible and horrified that it's necessary.
 
2022-05-22 6:18:34 PM  

Dasher McHappenstance: Household RO systems don't cost hundreds of thousands of dollars.  If these filters are for point of use then that would be a better comparison.

Glad to see Hermione Grainger is still out there doing good things for the world.


Hundreds to thousands of dollars
 
2022-05-22 6:34:13 PM  
So instead of lead people will just be drinking microparticles of plastic. But given the state of the water supply, they're probably doing that already.
 
2022-05-22 6:52:14 PM  
Rather clever design, works like a water softener, except it exchanges lead for calcium ions.  The color change when the calcium is exhausted is a great idea. Knowing when to change a filter of any type can be tricky.
 
2022-05-22 6:54:57 PM  

Tyrone Slothrop: So instead of lead people will just be drinking microparticles of plastic. But given the state of the water supply, they're probably doing that already.


I would thing a vast, vast number of houses are plumbed with pvc.  Anybody ever cut a length of that stuff?  It smells like cancer.
 
2022-05-22 7:16:05 PM  

wildcardjack: Pur?


Are you trying to get us to pet you?
 
2022-05-22 7:38:22 PM  
This post has been rated Pb.

/pretty brilliant.
 
2022-05-22 8:29:35 PM  

CoonAce: Tyrone Slothrop: So instead of lead people will just be drinking microparticles of plastic. But given the state of the water supply, they're probably doing that already.

I would thing a vast, vast number of houses are plumbed with pvc.  Anybody ever cut a length of that stuff?  It smells like cancer.


Ehh, water line plastic is cross linked polyethylene, not polyvinyl chloride.
 
2022-05-22 8:37:30 PM  

wildcardjack: CoonAce: Tyrone Slothrop: So instead of lead people will just be drinking microparticles of plastic. But given the state of the water supply, they're probably doing that already.

I would thing a vast, vast number of houses are plumbed with pvc.  Anybody ever cut a length of that stuff?  It smells like cancer.

Ehh, water line plastic is cross linked polyethylene, not polyvinyl chloride.


cpvc is chlorinated polyvinylcloride, and used for potable water.  I prefer the pex system, polyethylene.
 
2022-05-22 8:42:13 PM  

natazha: Rather clever design, works like a water softener, except it exchanges lead for calcium ions.  The color change when the calcium is exhausted is a great idea. Knowing when to change a filter of any type can be tricky.


As long as you don't mind drinking unreacted potassium iodide the rest of the time.
 
2022-05-22 10:04:57 PM  

wildcardjack: CoonAce: Tyrone Slothrop: So instead of lead people will just be drinking microparticles of plastic. But given the state of the water supply, they're probably doing that already.

I would thing a vast, vast number of houses are plumbed with pvc.  Anybody ever cut a length of that stuff?  It smells like cancer.

Ehh, water line plastic is cross linked polyethylene, not polyvinyl chloride.


The miles of mains leading to the home are commonly pvc.

Not really sure there's an issue though. The lines are almost always lightly coated with biofilms and rust, which can be problems in their own right.
 
2022-05-22 10:08:35 PM  
aaaaand we'll never hear about it again,amiriye?
 
2022-05-22 10:39:37 PM  

Ivo Shandor: natazha: Rather clever design, works like a water softener, except it exchanges lead for calcium ions.  The color change when the calcium is exhausted is a great idea. Knowing when to change a filter of any type can be tricky.

As long as you don't mind drinking unreacted potassium iodide the rest of the time.


Keeps the goiters away and protects you from the radioiodine in the coming nuclear holocaust

/KI is in most table salt, you're already consuming it
 
2022-05-22 11:04:52 PM  

CoonAce: Tyrone Slothrop: So instead of lead people will just be drinking microparticles of plastic. But given the state of the water supply, they're probably doing that already.

I would thing a vast, vast number of houses are plumbed with pvc.  Anybody ever cut a length of that stuff?  It smells like cancer.


PVC is used on the waste side, not the supply
 
2022-05-23 12:31:13 AM  
PVC is used in potable cold water supply all the time.  Cpvc is used for hot and cold, as is PEX.   Your regional code may vary.
 
2022-05-23 1:11:28 AM  

Tyrone Slothrop: So instead of lead people will just be drinking microparticles of plastic. But given the state of the water supply, they're probably doing that already.


Especially since the plastic is biodegradable.  That is not a desirable property for anything you intend to actually use.
 
2022-05-23 1:18:32 AM  

wildcardjack: Ehh, water line plastic is cross linked polyethylene, not polyvinyl chloride.


Does the material have a trade name?
 
2022-05-23 2:36:12 AM  
Cross linked polyethylene?  Commonly know as PEX.  Uponor is probably the biggest brand name. Rehau is another.
 
2022-05-23 6:40:41 AM  

CoonAce: Tyrone Slothrop: So instead of lead people will just be drinking microparticles of plastic. But given the state of the water supply, they're probably doing that already.

I would thing a vast, vast number of houses are plumbed with pvc.  Anybody ever cut a length of that stuff?  It smells like cancer.


Few homes (if any) have PVC water supply lines. You are thinking of drains and vent lines.  Most are either copper or PEX which is high molecular weight polyethylene (some use steel pipes or home owners install code violating other stuff).  PEX is almost all made in China so I wouldn't be surprised if large amounts of toxic phthalates or other chemicals are leaching out of those pipes.
 
2022-05-23 7:47:04 AM  

wildcardjack: Pur?


Pur n Kleen
 
2022-05-23 8:38:26 AM  

Northern: CoonAce: Tyrone Slothrop: So instead of lead people will just be drinking microparticles of plastic. But given the state of the water supply, they're probably doing that already.

I would thing a vast, vast number of houses are plumbed with pvc.  Anybody ever cut a length of that stuff?  It smells like cancer.

Few homes (if any) have PVC water supply lines. You are thinking of drains and vent lines.  Most are either copper or PEX which is high molecular weight polyethylene (some use steel pipes or home owners install code violating other stuff).  PEX is almost all made in China so I wouldn't be surprised if large amounts of toxic phthalates or other chemicals are leaching out of those pipes.


Inside the home that is true, but for lots of homes the connection from the house to the curb is PVC. Newer connections use blue poly, which is probably PEX. And as I said before, PVC is a common water main material. It's only real competition is ductile iron.
 
2022-05-23 11:17:25 AM  

Northern: CoonAce: Tyrone Slothrop: So instead of lead people will just be drinking microparticles of plastic. But given the state of the water supply, they're probably doing that already.

I would thing a vast, vast number of houses are plumbed with pvc.  Anybody ever cut a length of that stuff?  It smells like cancer.

Few homes (if any) have PVC water supply lines. You are thinking of drains and vent lines.  Most are either copper or PEX which is high molecular weight polyethylene (some use steel pipes or home owners install code violating other stuff).  PEX is almost all made in China so I wouldn't be surprised if large amounts of toxic phthalates or other chemicals are leaching out of those pipes.


Hmm.

Would be interesting to plot the rise of obesity and the usage of all types of plastic piping on a time line.
 
2022-05-23 11:18:38 AM  

Nosatril: Northern: CoonAce: Tyrone Slothrop: So instead of lead people will just be drinking microparticles of plastic. But given the state of the water supply, they're probably doing that already.

I would thing a vast, vast number of houses are plumbed with pvc.  Anybody ever cut a length of that stuff?  It smells like cancer.

Few homes (if any) have PVC water supply lines. You are thinking of drains and vent lines.  Most are either copper or PEX which is high molecular weight polyethylene (some use steel pipes or home owners install code violating other stuff).  PEX is almost all made in China so I wouldn't be surprised if large amounts of toxic phthalates or other chemicals are leaching out of those pipes.

Inside the home that is true, but for lots of homes the connection from the house to the curb is PVC. Newer connections use blue poly, which is probably PEX. And as I said before, PVC is a common water main material. It's only real competition is ductile iron.


Still better than Orangeburg. What a stupid idea.
 
2022-05-23 1:50:39 PM  
"Few homes (if any) have PVC water supply lines. You are thinking of drains and vent lines.  Most are either copper or PEX which is high molecular weight polyethylene (some use steel pipes or home owners install code violating other stuff).  PEX is almost all made in China so I wouldn't be surprised if large amounts of toxic phthalates or other chemicals are leaching out of those pipes."

Naw Bro.  Plenty of states allow PVC for water mains.   It's all over the south and south east US, especially in places with aggressive water.  Texas, Florida, Arizona...  Schedule 80 PVC is used for commercial buildings for cold water applications all over the US.  Not supper common, but maybe 10-20% of newer buildings.  The cheap ones where they don't want to pay for copper.

Blue Poly is different from PEX, not cross linked.  It was being used more widely in the 90's around here.  I mainly see it in agricultural use.

Not all PEX is made in China.   I went to the PEX Uponor factory in Minnesota a while back.  Saw the process with my own two eyes.

Orangeburg = Drain pipe made from rolled tar paper.  So awful.  Luckily only used because of WW2 scarcity.
 
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